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Old 10-06-2006, 05:57 PM   #1
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Joy Of Cooking vs. Good Housekeeping Cookbook

These two books have been in my parents home forever, they are editions dating back in the 70s. I was leafing through them and found them to be really good books, now I would like to buy a current edition to add to my collection and wanted some input as to your comparison of these two - particularly if you have cooked out of these recipes.... as right now, I can only purchase one. Thanks.

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Old 10-06-2006, 07:09 PM   #2
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I've got older copies of both books seven and have always liked GH much better. I haven't seen the new versions though.
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Old 10-06-2006, 07:13 PM   #3
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I've used them both quite a bit, but I have the new Joy of Cooking on pre-order. I think it is released the last of this month or first part of next.
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Old 10-06-2006, 08:20 PM   #4
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I'd pick Joy of Cooking. The About sections are informative and useful even if you're not cooking a dish from that book. I've found the recipes to be reliable and accurate.
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Old 10-07-2006, 12:10 AM   #5
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I would recommend that, if you have the opportunity, compare the older book recipes with the newer ones. Sometimes the newer books "cop out" and suggest that a mix be substituted for part of a recipe instead of doing things the "scratch" way.

As an example, I have a 1950 copy of the Betty Crocker Cookbook, which is an old standard. The newer one suggests that, instead of making xxxpotatoes, you use General Mills' version of xxxpotatoes mix/box and then following the recipe from then on.

I'm an old-fashioned scratch kind of cook even though I've worked full-time and have had a family and was still able to prepare non-boxed kinds of meals for my family. I just always found that it was quicker, healthier, less expensive and easier to prepare meals for my family that way.
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Old 10-07-2006, 12:24 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E
...As an example, I have a 1950 copy of the Betty Crocker Cookbook, which is an old standard. The newer one suggests that, instead of making xxxpotatoes, you use General Mills' version of xxxpotatoes mix/box and then following the recipe from then on...
That really stinks.

Recipeis in food manufactures' sites often list brand names in ingredients rather than just stating the generic name.

In Paul Prudhomme's first book in 1984, he lists the individual spices and herbs he uses to season a dish. In the newer website recipes, he calls for his spice blends - PP's meat magic, fish magic, etc.
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Old 10-07-2006, 01:41 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thymeless
I'd pick Joy of Cooking. The About sections are informative and useful even if you're not cooking a dish from that book. I've found the recipes to be reliable and accurate.
I grew up with both of these and between Joy of Cooking and Good Housekeeping - I have to concur with thymeless. Since you have copies to compare, Seven, look at them and compare the differences between them. I, too, find the About... information in JOC to be invaluable knowledge - knowing about the ingredients or technique will give you a better understanding of what is going on in any recipe from any source. In many instances that information is a non-technical Cliff's Notes type of explanation of things that you would need Harold McGee's or Shirley Corrier's books to find. I still have my JOC and look to it at least once a week for information - loaned my GH to someone several years ago and don't miss it.

And, I agree with Andy M. - cookbooks that come from a food manufacturer (like Betty Crocker) or chefs who have a product on the market often tend to call for their products instead of giving you the "scratch" ingredients. David Wade, The Gourmet, may have started this trend when he had his TV show and his Worchestershire Powder on the market - nowhere in his book is there an equivalent of liguid to power as an alternative. Betty Crocker wants you to use their products for the foundation of a dish (similar to Sandra Lee on Semi-Homemade).
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Old 10-07-2006, 07:05 AM   #8
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That irritates me too, for example, cookbooks put out by food companies like Kraft that call for ingredients like "Velveeta cheese" in their recipies. They're pushing their products when all I want to do is to cook something.

On the OT, this is a very hard choice, again, pick both. "Joy of Cooking" would be my pick if I was forced to choose at gunpoint, I like its format only marginally more than that of the other.
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Old 10-11-2006, 11:33 AM   #9
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I, too, own both. Actually l own 2 Joy and am on my second GH. At this point in life I'd choose Joy if I had to choose; however if I was buying for a very young, very inexperienced newby, I'd choose GH. I learned from the latter when I was a child.
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Old 10-11-2006, 11:40 AM   #10
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I generally don't use cookbooks like those, but I am glad I have a Joy of Cooking handy when I need it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E
As an example, I have a 1950 copy of the Betty Crocker Cookbook, which is an old standard. The newer one suggests that, instead of making xxxpotatoes, you use General Mills' version of xxxpotatoes mix/box and then following the recipe from then on..
Oooooh. I have one of those too! The best part of that cookbook is the incredibly bizarre, marginally edible recipes (eg, "herring whipped cream surprise") submitted by midwestern housewives (eg, Mrs. Vernon Knudsen from Grand Rapids, MN). Both my dad and grandfather worked at GM. My mother got a personal letter from Betty Crocker when she made her first loaf of home-baked bread, at the age of 10.
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