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Old 09-09-2012, 09:18 PM   #41
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I don't remember a round cookie with an almond in the center--I remember some crescent cookies that were sprinkled with ground up almonds. I don't remember the sugar and cinnamon. I also remember "S" cookies and a Norwegian "log" cookie, but it had cardamon in it and I don't remember any topping on it. And, I know which recipes those are, I've made those for years. She hand formed the crescents...but then, there were times she just rolled out the dough and cut circles (why she didn't make balls and flatten, who knows). Dang that I didn't do this when my mom still had her mind.
I just realized that there wouldn't be cinnamon in an almond cookie.
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Old 09-09-2012, 10:14 PM   #42
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CWS, one of the good thing about dementia or Alzheimer's (if there is such a good thing) is that the patient may not remember today and yesterday, but they do remember yesteryear. This might just be the best time to ask her about your grandmother's recipes.

There is one patient at Winthrop that talks about her children as if they were going off to school today. She wants to make sure they have their lunch and are dressed warm. Yet when her kids come to see her, she has no idea who they are. She thinks they are staff members checking up on her. Her kids are all in their 50's.
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Old 09-09-2012, 10:42 PM   #43
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CWS, one of the good thing about dementia or Alzheimer's (if there is such a good thing) is that the patient may not remember today and yesterday, but they do remember yesteryear. This might just be the best time to ask her about your grandmother's recipes.

There is one patient at Winthrop that talks about her children as if they were going off to school today. She wants to make sure they have their lunch and are dressed warm. Yet when her kids come to see her, she has no idea who they are. She thinks they are staff members checking up on her. Her kids are all in their 50's.
Very good point Addie. As it gets worse, they get "younger" or at least my mum did. In 2003 she though I was one of her older sisters. In 2005 she spent a lot of time in a world of memories from when she was about 10 years old.
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Old 09-23-2012, 11:22 AM   #44
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My mother, who has dementia, remembers "Hairdressers." They are cookies! Grandma cut them with a round biscuit cutter. I still have to test the recipe, but having my mom remember these cookies--well, it brought tears to my eyes. According to her, Grandma used to make these to have on hand after the hockey games and at Christmas--which is what I remember. Having this conversation with my mom and having her remember these cookies, made me cry. Especially since I talked to my dad first and he is so frustrated with my mom's lack of memory and being able to do things. have to make a batch! And, yes, we call them "Hairdressers."
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Old 09-23-2012, 11:57 AM   #45
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My mother, who has dementia, remembers "Hairdressers." They are cookies! Grandma cut them with a round biscuit cutter. I still have to test the recipe, but having my mom remember these cookies--well, it brought tears to my eyes. According to her, Grandma used to make these to have on hand after the hockey games and at Christmas--which is what I remember. Having this conversation with my mom and having her remember these cookies, made me cry. Especially since I talked to my dad first and he is so frustrated with my mom's lack of memory and being able to do things. have to make a batch! And, yes, we call them "Hairdressers."
Oh yeah, with dementia, they forget the newest memories first and keep the oldest ones the longest. Ask her all the old stuff before that vanishes too.

I saw that with my own mother. What she could remember and what she thought about got younger and younger. Towards the end she only seemed to remember up to about age 10. She repeated the same stories as if they were current. She lived near the Amalienborg, the Danish Royal Palace and used to see King Christian X riding his horse, while she was on the way to school. I can't count how many times she told me that he used to say, "Good morning Elisabeth." every morning. I'm pretty sure she could have told me what he was wearing. But, she didn't know who I was.
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Old 09-23-2012, 12:40 PM   #46
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My Dad was not diagnosed with Alzheimer's; however, specially in his last year he would forget everything that just happened but remember clearly about the past. He knew who we were, but I could mention a name we discussed the day before, and he wouldn't know who they were.

But he would go on and on with me about food that he remembered from his Mom, his grandmothers, my Mom, etc. I would try to make these items, but between his swallowing problem (I had to puree everything) and the fact most of these did NOT come with recipes, it was a challenge....a labour of love.
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Old 09-23-2012, 12:54 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
My mother, who has dementia, remembers "Hairdressers." They are cookies! Grandma cut them with a round biscuit cutter. I still have to test the recipe, but having my mom remember these cookies--well, it brought tears to my eyes. According to her, Grandma used to make these to have on hand after the hockey games and at Christmas--which is what I remember. Having this conversation with my mom and having her remember these cookies, made me cry. Especially since I talked to my dad first and he is so frustrated with my mom's lack of memory and being able to do things. have to make a batch! And, yes, we call them "Hairdressers."
That is wonderful CWS. She might benefit from daily discussion of the recipes and what your Grandmother meant. Keeping your Mom involved won't reverse but it will give her purpose and something she can excel at.
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Old 09-23-2012, 01:03 PM   #48
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That is wonderful CWS. She might benefit from daily discussion of the recipes and what your Grandmother meant. Keeping your Mom involved won't reverse but it will give her purpose and something she can excel at.
I totally agree. With Dad, getting him to talk about his trip to New York after the war, or his beloved Grandmother were always good strategies to steer him from the frustration of his health and lack of present memory.

CWS, you are a very caring daughter and I know how frustrating it can be, but just the fact you care as much as you do is helping your Mom - try to remember that.
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Old 09-23-2012, 02:03 PM   #49
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That is wonderful CWS. She might benefit from daily discussion of the recipes and what your Grandmother meant. Keeping your Mom involved won't reverse but it will give her purpose and something she can excel at.
+1 PF and LP. I'm crying!
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Old 10-07-2012, 09:48 PM   #50
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My mother, who has dementia, remembers "Hairdressers." They are cookies! Grandma cut them with a round biscuit cutter. I still have to test the recipe, but having my mom remember these cookies--well, it brought tears to my eyes. According to her, Grandma used to make these to have on hand after the hockey games and at Christmas--which is what I remember. Having this conversation with my mom and having her remember these cookies, made me cry. Especially since I talked to my dad first and he is so frustrated with my mom's lack of memory and being able to do things. have to make a batch! And, yes, we call them "Hairdressers."
CW, your fathers' frustration is hidden anger. He is losing someone he loves and there is nothing he can do about it. Let him know that you understand and feel the same frustrations sometimes. Right now he feels alone. There is a patient at Winthrop that used to visit his wife every day. She has Alzheimer's and he would have lunch with her. Now he still comes every day because he is now also an Alzheimer patient. His wife no longer knows who he is. When he sits with her for lunch, she often will verbally attack him. Pretty soon she will be having lunch behind locked doors under more controlled conditions. She is becoming a danger to other patients. Mostly to her husband.
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