"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Cookbooks, Software etc.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-20-2006, 06:16 PM   #11
Senior Cook
 
KathyJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Sunny and Rainy California
Posts: 171
What a great gift!

How long did it take you to train them?....
My husband still hasn't bought me a cookbook and I collect them! Although, he does get me gift cards..... Probably better as I'm sure he doesn't know which ones I have and don't have.

my oldest is a reprint. The Compleat American Housewife 1776 by nitty gritty publications. Very fun to read. Also "From the Hearth" -18th century recipes and excerpts. Have a few from 40's, 50's and 60's. Got on a kick to try and get cookbooks prior to the "modernization" of canned food/preservatives....
__________________

__________________
KathyJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2006, 06:29 PM   #12
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
KathyJ, I think you hit it on the head. It is always hard to buy something for a person who collects anything, because so often they already have what they want. Especially with young couples, putting in an order for exactly what you want takes the romance out of a gift. But even when you're on the same wavelength, there can be confusion. For example, a couple of years ago, I could have sworn I read somewhere that someone had written an MFK Fisher bio. I mentioned it to hubby, and he went to B&N and requested it. He proudly presented me with the book he thought I requested. It turned out to be a re-issue of a compilation of several of her books and articles -- that he'd bought me when it first came out many years ago (just a new cover and intro). I returned it after much debate (I could have donated it to the library, one of my favorite causes, and not hurt his feelings). He understood. I asked around and looked on the internet and still have no idea why I was under the impression that someone had written her bio. I seldom buy anyone a gift of something they collect ... it is just too easy to screw it up.
__________________

__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2006, 06:36 PM   #13
Senior Cook
 
KathyJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Sunny and Rainy California
Posts: 171
I know, but it would be nice if the effort was taken once in a while....

I usually donate to the Friends of the Library book sales, if I have any. Our library told me that they usually don't keep the books that are donated, forget exactly why now. Although, if it's new, I don't think they would. But, they then sell them along with the discards at $1 or $.50. I think you made the right decision.
__________________
KathyJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2006, 06:44 PM   #14
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
I've used libraries far and wide, and always ask what happens with donated books. Depending on where I've lived, some are put on the shelves, some are sold. Here there are two categories of books that are sold, some at an annual book sale, but there's a $1 (paperback), $2 (hard) shelf in the library itself. But the main thing I ascertain before donating is if the money goes to my particular library or does it dissappear into state/county/city coffers. That is important to me. Here I know whatever I donate goes back into our local library, one way or another.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2006, 06:47 PM   #15
Executive Chef
 
bethzaring's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Northern New Mexico
Posts: 4,599
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire
. A weird one I've mention before, off the top of my head, I think it's titled something like the Bull and Cock Cookbook, I'm pretty sure the author is Herter.
Claire, about 35 years ago I bought a Herters cookbook, do not remember the title, the recipes were mildly interesting, but Mr. Herters' rhetoric was mighty oppressive. I bought a pair of boots from Herters', best pair I ever had, and the cookbook in their catalog caught my eye. I still sometimes wish I had kept that cookbook.
__________________
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. Margaret Mead
bethzaring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2006, 07:07 PM   #16
Executive Chef
 
Half Baked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,927
It warms you heart when you know someone (especially children) have really put alot of thought and effort into a present.

That's wonderful.
__________________
Jan
Please spay and neuter your pets. The Animal Rescue Site
Half Baked is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2006, 07:28 PM   #17
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 605
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire
I, too, have quite a few old cook books. I have a "new" Joy of Cooking, but also an old one. Then there are reproductions (OK, real old would be better) that I've picked up here and there. A weird one I've mention before, off the top of my head, I think it's titled something like the Bull and Cock Cookbook, I'm pretty sure the author is Herter. I actually had a Betty Crocker that I finally gave up on (not before going through and pulling out every single page that wasn't identical to the new one I bought!!). Buying cookbooks, especially in old book stores and restaurant supply stores, is a passion.
My husband and I share that passion, Claire. We've always enjoyed cookbooks and bought them on a regular basis, but a few months ago, we started collecting in earnest...primarily early 20th century but quite an eclectic mix in general. I"ve even started a colllection of early Jello pamphlets -- I hate jello but love that amazing artwork.

We started out with a couple fairly modern editions of Joy of Cooking but recently acquired a first printing of the1936 edition, the first time that the book was published by an outside company. The Joy of Cooking made its debut appearance in 1931, when Rombauer published it herself. We have not yet to come across one of those, but even if we do, it's doubtful we could afford the thousands it would probably command.
__________________
suzyQ3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2006, 08:20 PM   #18
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
The Herter's cookbook was called Bull Cook and Authentic Historical Recipes and Practices by George Leonard and Berte E. Herter. I have the 3rd edition published in 1961 - 1st and 2nd editions were published in 1960. This was a gift from my "baby boy" (30) and his wife a couple of years ago.

Apparently, a "Bull Cook" was the cook in a logging camp. Herter's was a very sucessfull sporting good store, and I remember the catalogs, like Ted Williams endorsing everything in the Montgomery Wards catalogs of the day, and dreamed of someday being able to buy things from them. The Herter's story is an interesting read ...

While I found the stories of the origins of certain dishes somewhat impressive, rather than oppressive like Beth, I must admit that sometimes I thought there was more "Bull" than historical fact ... but some of them fit what what I have read in other places. So, maybe George really did his homework?

It's an interesting piece of Americana ... if you don't want a historic cookbook with a historical background preable to a narative style recipe .. you don't want this book!
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2006, 08:23 PM   #19
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
bethz, the Herter cookbook was one that was given to me by my mother, who'd recieved it used from someone else. Mostly as gag gifts because it is so odd. For those who are curious, it is Bull Cook and Authentic Historical REcipes and Practices by George Leonard Herter and Berthe E. Herter of Herter's, Waseca, MN. I wrote in it when it was given to me that it was given to my parents by Bea Mackey in 1965 in Reno, NV. The authors definitely had some very specific ideas of how food should be prepared, and I don't know of anyone who has ever used a recipe from it. It is very opinionated. Everyone in my family has used it for entertainment value! I mean, have any of you heard of Shut Your Mouth Sandwich or Tartine Fermez Votre Bouche?

How to make a peanut butter sandwich? How to clean a turtle? The tomato and the skunk? Titty sauce yams?

As for the fact that he is very opinionated and put out a lot of garbage that he tried to pass off as history, how about, "The Mowhawk Indians are descented fro the Celts and are cousins of the Irish, Scotch, Bretons and Welsh." ?????

There is a strong line of BS, but it is so fun to read!
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2006, 09:12 PM   #20
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
LOL - the tomato juice bath does work for the "skunk works" ... and the recipe for "How to fry pork sausages German style" (page 38) is spot on - although there are other/easier ways.

True - most of us are not going to rush out to make a batch of "Prairie Dog Bat Masterson" - based on the name - but if you read the recipe it isn't bad (hey, it's just a weiner sandwich) ... but, it's interesting to read. If you look at the Joy of Cooking (1993 edition or before) you'll find recipes for things that you'll probably never cook, either! And far more disagreeable to "delicate sensibilities" than a "Prairie Dog" sandwich.

I just love really old cook books!

OH - there was a program the other night on PBS ... there is some archaeological/anthropological evidence that a/some Native American tribe(s) in the NE were descended from early Celtic peoples. I don't know what tribe .. I was half asleep ....
__________________

__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.