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Old 11-07-2008, 04:06 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by gadzooks View Post
Meta Givens Modern Encyclopedia of Cooking. 1947-1955. Two volumes. I bought the first volume for a quarter at a thrift, because I liked the cake recipes. I wanted, later, to look something up, but found it was probably in volume 2. Recently found volume 2, but forgot what I was gonna look up. Have times changed? Well, volume 2 has a great recipe for brain fritters. These are great cookbooks, with some minor substitutions. Lard was very much en vogue back then.
and lard is back "en vogue" today. much better for you than shortening, and waaay tastier results.
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Old 11-07-2008, 07:50 PM   #12
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on eBay, I bought a cookbook published in 1913 in Oskaloosa Iowa. It is titled "Friends' Cook Book" and in this case, Friends stands for the Religious Society of Friends, also known as Quakers. I would have had many ancestors belonging to this Church in 1913 and was hoping to find them represented in this cookbook. And they are. My great grandmother, my great great grandmother and her sister all contributed recipes. My grandmother would have been 23 years old but didn't contribute any recipes, but with three cooks in this multi-generational house, maybe she didn't have to cook? The cookbook has ads pertaining to food products; jello, Karo, Kingsford's Corn Starch, Royal baking powder, as well as local merchants ads. Other ads include Edison Mazda Lamps (light bulbs), steam and hot water boilers, a Phelps Smokeless Water Heater that got Oskaloosa through the cold winter of 1911-1912. This era was pre-refrigeration, as evidenced by techniques of how to handle meat salads. There is also a section of helpful hints at the back of the book, and sample menus for all meals, special occassions, seasonal meals.

The vegetable recipes are dreadful, boiling the poor things to death, as well as some other questionable recipes, chocolate walnut jello?? I was surprised by the number of fish and citrus recipes.

This is a wonderful cook book for me to see a slice of life of my ancestors.
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Old 11-08-2008, 11:10 AM   #13
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How exciting Beth!
I love old cookbooks. I have a couple that I really enjoy ... "Woman's Favorite Cook Book" from 1906 - wonderful condition with the color pictures still colorful; "A Thousand Ways to Please a Husband With Bettina's Favorite Recipes" from 1917 - a story about a couples first year of marriage. Each day is written about and includes her daily activity (stocking her pantry, mending clothes, lunching with the ladies) and then what she made for supper. It my favorite book!

What I have noticed in all of them, though, is how popular veal was because it was considered a cheap cut. Again, how times have changed!
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Old 11-08-2008, 02:34 PM   #14
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I ALMOST got a 1948 Culinary Institute Cookbook but it went for over $50 at an auction recently, darn it.
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Old 11-12-2008, 09:59 AM   #15
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I inherited a copy of the 1938 second edition printing of the 1931 "Household Searchlight" cookbook. I think it was a collection of recipes published in a magazine way-back-when. Lots of really interesting articles. When I first opened it, there were numerous clippings of recipes between the front cover and the first page. One of those had an artist's rendering of the US Army's newest bomber, a B-25 Mitchell, chasing and shooting down a Japanese Zero. I believe that clipping was dated for '39 or '40.

I also have Escoffier's cookbook. While it's a modern reprinting, I don't believe anything was really changed since it was translated in the early part of the 20th Century.
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Old 11-12-2008, 11:38 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gadzooks View Post
Meta Givens Modern Encyclopedia of Cooking. 1947-1955. Two volumes. I bought the first volume for a quarter at a thrift, because I liked the cake recipes. I wanted, later, to look something up, but found it was probably in volume 2. Recently found volume 2, but forgot what I was gonna look up. Have times changed? Well, volume 2 has a great recipe for brain fritters. These are great cookbooks, with some minor substitutions. Lard was very much en vogue back then.
Meta Givens books are really an historical look back to see how people ate. She has recipes for squirrel, too. I have both of them--also thrift store finds.

I also have my mom's and a much earlier edition of The Settlement Cookbook (The Way to a Man's Heart Is Through His Stomach). It is a fantastic book, even today. Also, there are old fashioned ads in the older edition.
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Old 11-12-2008, 01:46 PM   #17
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...I also have my mom's and a much earlier edition of The Settlement Cookbook (The Way to a Man's Heart Is Through His Stomach). It is a fantastic book, even today. Also, there are old fashioned ads in the older edition.
OH! I love that one too! I especially love the menus at the back. I have a 1936 printing ... do you know how many were done?
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Old 11-13-2008, 04:24 PM   #18
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I have a 1951 edition of The Settlement Cookbook..... no ads. :(
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