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Old 08-05-2017, 09:33 AM   #1
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Please help me decode this 1800s recipe!

I've been on a kick lately reading some old cookbooks, many of which have hand written recipes on the blank pages. I found this recipe interesting but can't figure out some of the measurements....brown sugar looks like "do"...
Anyone have any ideas?

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Old 08-05-2017, 09:39 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by Rparrny View Post
I've been on a kick lately reading some old cookbooks, many of which have hand written recipes on the blank pages. I found this recipe interesting but can't figure out some of the measurements....brown sugar looks like "do"...
Anyone have any ideas?
I can't read it. Can you post a higher-resolution image? Maybe as a PDF?
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Old 08-05-2017, 10:38 AM   #3
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Here's what I've been able to discern as far as ingredients are concerned:

CHRISTMAS PLUM PUDDING
1 pint bowl grated bread crumbs
1 cup suet, chopped
1 do brown sugar
do molasses ?
do sour milk
2 teaspoons ? ?
teacup brandy
1 teaspoon each ? ? ? lemon extract
4 eggs beat ?
1 large cup raisins
1 do do currants
1 small piece citron, cut fine


Not sure what the "do" measurement signifies but it appears a number of times.


Maybe you could search the Internet for an early plum pudding recipe and come up with an adequate match.
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Old 08-05-2017, 10:42 AM   #4
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Here's one from 1912 that might give you some clue about the other ingredients, along with the method of preparation.
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Old 08-05-2017, 11:32 AM   #5
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I googled "what does do mean in 1800s recipes" and came up with several sources that indicate it is an abbreviation for ditto. That would seem to fit in this recipe, especially given the double dos under raisins for currants.
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Old 08-05-2017, 12:15 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie H View Post
Here's what I've been able to discern as far as ingredients are concerned:

CHRISTMAS PLUM PUDDING
1 pint bowl grated bread crumbs
1 cup suet, chopped
1 do brown sugar
do molasses ?
do sour milk
2 teaspoons ? ?
teacup brandy
1 teaspoon each ? ? ? lemon extract
4 eggs beat ?
1 large cup raisins
1 do do currants
1 small piece citron, cut fine


Not sure what the "do" measurement signifies but it appears a number of times.


Maybe you could search the Internet for an early plum pudding recipe and come up with an adequate match.
I'd guess that do refers to what we now call a dollop.which in itself is indefinite. Somewhere in between a Tps and a Tbs.

Lest we forget, grandma didn't have access to an electronic scale or in many cases even measuring spoons and cups.
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Old 08-05-2017, 12:26 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
I googled "what does do mean in 1800s recipes" and came up with several sources that indicate it is an abbreviation for ditto. That would seem to fit in this recipe, especially given the double dos under raisins for currants.

Ditto makes sense. You can't "dollop" milk or other liquids ...
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Old 08-05-2017, 02:40 PM   #8
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IF "ditto" is correct, that's the weirdest thing I've heard in a long time.
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Old 08-05-2017, 03:04 PM   #9
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1 do do currants
I wouldn't eat anything that calls for do do
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Old 08-05-2017, 03:28 PM   #10
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I wouldn't eat anything that calls for do do
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
IF "ditto" is correct, that's the weirdest thing I've heard in a long time.
You know language changes over time and we're talking over 100 years here. Things don't mean the same now as then, and there are a whole lot of words in use now that weren't in use then (and vice versa).
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