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Old 10-05-2010, 06:28 AM   #51
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Three books in close succession fired my love for cooking:

The Cookery of England by Elizabeth Ayrton
An Omelette and a Glass of Wine by Elizabeth David
English Bread and Yeast Cookery by Elizabeth David

Incredibly, Amazon UK are selling Elizabeth Ayrton's book, "16 Used", for just one British penny, plus postage. Now how's that for a bargain?

I have since passed them onto Moon Flower who is inspired.
Actually, An Omelete and a Glass of Wine isn't a cookbook, but an amazing account of Elizabeth David's life around her experiences of food. Mum gave me the book to inspire me on how to make Omellette Moliere. The book not only helped me make the best omelettes in my family, but got me fired up on cooking. A brilliant book.
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Old 10-14-2010, 07:25 PM   #52
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I didn't like the binder in the betty crocker picture cook book that I gave it to my nephew. I had found someone on ebay selling the 1998 hardcopy brand news in excellent conditions for really cheat $10.00 I prefer hardcover books better.

I got my 2nd cookbook Artisan Bread In Five Minutes a Day.
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Old 10-22-2010, 08:12 PM   #53
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my first cookbook --1971 newly living together before getting married we were fine dining on steakettes and KD dinner (@ 2 for 17 cents ) we thought we better do something or die. The Complete Cookery Encyclopedia --thomas allen toronto
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Old 11-01-2010, 11:02 AM   #54
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Hi everyone.
Im looking for a good book for making soups, does anyone know to one or have a good recipe?
I've found a good sight for little handy tips : Granny Tips ! Grandma's tips, tricks, remedies and recipes.
Does anyone know to one?
Thanks
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Old 11-01-2010, 05:50 PM   #55
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Incredibly, Amazon UK are selling Elizabeth Ayrton's book, "16 Used", for just one British penny, plus postage. Now how's that for a bargain?
wow, thank you for the heads up! I've been wanting to learn english cooking for a while, but it's not easy getting recommendations for good english cookbooks as it's misinterpreted as a bad cuisine. That's a great price and there are only 9 left now. I just wish I could see the table of contents to know what there is.

As for my first cookbook, I bought a few random ones in early highschool/middle school, but I've only now gotten really involved. I've gotten Julia Child's mastering the art of french cooking and recommend it, as for age I bought it this week, and I'm 20. It's not my first cookbook, but it's the first that's influenced me.


can't wait for Ayrton's book!
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Old 11-08-2010, 08:16 PM   #56
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I learned on Better Homes and Gardens, Cook it Right and Rumfords all back in 75ish. I have a couple hundred cookbooks now but pretty sure I don't have those originals anymore! Go figure! FWIW BH&G is on sale at the local Wally for under $20, so maybe I'll do a nostalgia buy.
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Old 11-21-2010, 10:49 AM   #57
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Better Homes and Gardens from the early 50's. I inherited it from a favorite Aunt. She must have been like me in never following the recipe exactly as she had copious notes in the margins on how to improve the recipe.
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Old 11-21-2010, 01:50 PM   #58
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Better Homes and Gardens from the early 50's. I inherited it from a favorite Aunt. She must have been like me in never following the recipe exactly as she had copious notes in the margins on how to improve the recipe.
How lucky for you!
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Old 11-21-2010, 09:49 PM   #59
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My mother and grandmothers did not cook from cookbooks. Being from Sorrento, Italy, they did not need instructions on cooking. I learned from watching my mother, who was a fabulous cook. However, when I got married, in the mid 60's I bought The Joy of Cooking and then I bought Mastering the Art of French Cooking. I found that I loved to just read cookbooks so it became a hobby of mine to collect cookbooks and I now have hundreds of them. At this point, I would like to start selling some of them off.

I just came back from Costco and they had a lot of great new cookbooks there. Sunset, and the Bon Appetit, and one called Things Cooks Love put out by Sur La Table. I really wanted a couple of them but was thinking I need to get rid of some that I have first.
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Old 11-30-2010, 05:16 AM   #60
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The first two cookbooks I ever owned were gifts on the same Christmas from my Mother (who was a talented chef, very French trained), and my sister. They were "Southern Cooking" by Mrs. S.R.Dull from my Mom, and "Ginger Tea Makes Friends", a trendy little '60's gem by James Barber, who wrote a food column for the Vancouver Sun back then. I was in grade 11 or 12, I believe.

That same year, for my birthday, Mom gave me a copy of Mme. Jehene Benoit's "Encylopedia of Canadian Cooking" and "The Joys of Jewish Cooking" (we're Catholic, not Jewish, but love that Old World stuff, can't think of the author off the top of my head right now.

After that, I bought my own copy of Beryl Marton's "Out of the Garden into the Kitchen" and "The Black Family Reunion Cookbook" and those volumes with the above ones served me for years, and probably fixed my style of rustic cooking.

When I got into "trendy" cuisine, I bought Bobby Flay's "Bold American Food" and "The Vegetable Book" by Annie Bell, and these listed volumes form the backbone of my limited skills.
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