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Old 07-01-2017, 01:52 PM   #1
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Question Anodized aluminum pans?

And I was looking at these new hard anodized aluminum pans that are “non stick” (Anolon 83324 Bronze Collection). But they do not tell anything about what makes them “non-stickable”. Can I burn oil onto the surface to replace what ever it is when it come off??

And they claim that the surface is twice as hard as stainless steel, with out telling how thin the anodized part is. So I expect the pan to disintegrate with in a few years.

Do you think that a cast iron crepe pan would be a better idea. I know how to season it, but I don't know how often I would have to do it.

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Old 07-01-2017, 03:12 PM   #2
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From http://www.anodizing.org/?page=what_is_anodizing

"Anodizing is an electrochemical process that converts the metal surface into a decorative, durable, corrosion-resistant, anodic oxide finish. Aluminum is ideally suited to anodizing, although other nonferrous metals, such as magnesium and titanium, also can be anodized.

The anodic oxide structure originates from the aluminum substrate and is composed entirely of aluminum oxide. This aluminum oxide is not applied to the surface like paint or plating, but is fully integrated with the underlying aluminum substrate, so it cannot chip or peel. It has a highly ordered, porous structure that allows for secondary processes such as coloring and sealing."

So it's not a coating that will peel off. If you want to use it for making crepes, this would be better than cast iron.
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Old 07-01-2017, 03:27 PM   #3
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My guess is that they are traditional non-stick pans. "Bronze" is the shiny new catch-phrase in cookware, in my view. I have Anolon anodized non-stick pans with a grey non-stick surface both inside and out. The interior coating, however, is much stronger than the exterior - the pans are at least 14 years old and going strong. Only my large "chicken fryer" is showing enough wear that I need to think about buying a replacement pan.

I say treat it as a traditional non-stick pan. If you want a non-stick pan for making crepes, Steve Kroll has a carbon steel pan that he bought for many uses. Carbon steel is similar to cast iron in the fact that it needs seasoning. It differs in weight, however, in being much lighter. If you want to read any of Steve's posts about his pan, I found one you can use as a starting point, then feel free to search around if you want more information.
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Old 07-01-2017, 05:01 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
My guess is that they are traditional non-stick pans. "Bronze" is the shiny new catch-phrase in cookware, in my view. I have Anolon anodized non-stick pans with a grey non-stick surface both inside and out. The interior coating, however, is much stronger than the exterior - the pans are at least 14 years old and going strong. Only my large "chicken fryer" is showing enough wear that I need to think about buying a replacement pan.

I say treat it as a traditional non-stick pan. If you want a non-stick pan for making crepes, Steve Kroll has a carbon steel pan that he bought for many uses. Carbon steel is similar to cast iron in the fact that it needs seasoning. It differs in weight, however, in being much lighter. If you want to read any of Steve's posts about his pan, I found one you can use as a starting point, then feel free to search around if you want more information.
To me, a "traditional" non-stick pan is coated with Teflon, which will eventually start to peel, especially if metal utensils are used on it. An anodized aluminum pan is not like that.

The interior is "stronger" because it's not a coating - it was created by an electrochemical process that chemically changed the surface of the pan.
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Old 07-01-2017, 05:16 PM   #5
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well it sounds like I could bake on oil to the anodized surface.

I had a nice teflon wok that the teflon did nto last very long. I still use the pan.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
My guess is that they are traditional non-stick pans. "Bronze" is the shiny new catch-phrase in cookware, in my view. I have Anolon anodized non-stick pans with a grey non-stick surface both inside and out. The interior coating, however, is much stronger than the exterior - the pans are at least 14 years old and going strong. Only my large "chicken fryer" is showing enough wear that I need to think about buying a replacement pan.

I say treat it as a traditional non-stick pan. If you want a non-stick pan for making crepes, Steve Kroll has a carbon steel pan that he bought for many uses. Carbon steel is similar to cast iron in the fact that it needs seasoning. It differs in weight, however, in being much lighter. If you want to read any of Steve's posts about his pan, I found one you can use as a starting point, then feel free to search around if you want more information.
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Old 07-01-2017, 05:17 PM   #6
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Question Seasoning

using my old crepe pan, I still had a spot on the pan that was sticking Injera, so I thought I should try burning (my oven is dead) more layers of oil on my crepe pan, but I spaced out and came back to find that the oil was burnt to carbon, and flaking off. So I get to start over again at a lower heat to keep the center from burning too much?? So I am hoping that a cast iron pan will hold the oil much better so not much is needed.

Maybe I was using the wrong kind of oil, toasted sesame oil is what I had on hand. Does non drying oil work better? I found an article that says to use only 100% flaxseed oil. Seems like walnut oil would be just as good.

And the article says to slowly heat and cool the pan for each layer of oil applied, 6 times! Do you think it would be easyer or harder to season a plain steel pan that is thin??

I once found a cast iron pan with oil or something burned on so hard I could not get it off, maybe it was plastic. I didn't try cooking with it.

Maybe I should just forget about seasoning the steel pans and get an anodized aluminum pan with a very thick bottom. Is there a brand that is better than the one mentioned above, that is not much more expensive?
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Old 07-01-2017, 06:25 PM   #7
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Anodizing is just a way of finishing aluminum. The grey finished Calphalon is anodized aluminum.

I believe Calphalon's non-stick uses some form of teflon/PTFE/etcetera on the cooking surface.

An anodized aluminum pan on its own doesn't seem to me like a great non-stick surface. It would basically be like regular Calphalon.

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Old 07-02-2017, 08:06 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jawnn View Post
using my old crepe pan, I still had a spot on the pan that was sticking Injera, so I thought I should try burning (my oven is dead) more layers of oil on my crepe pan, but I spaced out and came back to find that the oil was burnt to carbon, and flaking off. So I get to start over again at a lower heat to keep the center from burning too much?? So I am hoping that a cast iron pan will hold the oil much better so not much is needed.

Maybe I was using the wrong kind of oil, toasted sesame oil is what I had on hand. Does non drying oil work better? I found an article that says to use only 100% flaxseed oil. Seems like walnut oil would be just as good.

And the article says to slowly heat and cool the pan for each layer of oil applied, 6 times! Do you think it would be easyer or harder to season a plain steel pan that is thin??

I once found a cast iron pan with oil or something burned on so hard I could not get it off, maybe it was plastic. I didn't try cooking with it.

Maybe I should just forget about seasoning the steel pans and get an anodized aluminum pan with a very thick bottom. Is there a brand that is better than the one mentioned above, that is not much more expensive?
Flax seed oil is good. It's what I use, particularly on display items, and the method you read works well. But it is not the only workable oil. Others such as vegetable oils, Crisco, also work well. The key is an oil that polymerizes easily. I don't know is sesame oil fits into that category. I've never used it or walnut oil.

I tend to think we over think cast iron seasoning. The key is multiple thin coats of a polymerizing oil.. Even just using the pan will eventually produce a polymerized coating. I've got a couple well seasoned pans that were never officially seasoned. Just used.

Your CI pan you could not get clean had burnt on cooking residue on it. It can be removed by either scraping (tedious), using a chucked wire brush, passing it through the clean cycle on an oven, or immersing in a bucket of lye for a few days.

CI is nearly impossible to destroy. It can be cracked by huge temperature extremes. Removing from a very hot oven and immersing in cold water can crack it. That's about it.
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Old 07-02-2017, 10:11 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
Flax seed oil is good. It's what I use, particularly on display items, and the method you read works well. But it is not the only workable oil. Others such as vegetable oils, Crisco, also work well. The key is an oil that polymerizes easily. I don't know is sesame oil fits into that category. I've never used it or walnut oil.

I tend to think we over think cast iron seasoning. The key is multiple thin coats of a polymerizing oil.. Even just using the pan will eventually produce a polymerized coating. I've got a couple well seasoned pans that were never officially seasoned. Just used.

Your CI pan you could not get clean had burnt on cooking residue on it. It can be removed by either scraping (tedious), using a chucked wire brush, passing it through the clean cycle on an oven, or immersing in a bucket of lye for a few days.

CI is nearly impossible to destroy. It can be cracked by huge temperature extremes. Removing from a very hot oven and immersing in cold water can crack it. That's about it.
Agree with all of this. Sesame seed and walnut seed oils are expensive. I would not suggest using them just for this. Use them for seasoning your food

I use canola oil to season my cast iron.
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Old 07-02-2017, 11:14 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
My guess is that they are traditional non-stick pans. "Bronze" is the shiny new catch-phrase in cookware, in my view. I have Anolon anodized non-stick pans with a grey non-stick surface both inside and out. The interior coating, however, is much stronger than the exterior - the pans are at least 14 years old and going strong. Only my large "chicken fryer" is showing enough wear that I need to think about buying a replacement pan.

I say treat it as a traditional non-stick pan. If you want a non-stick pan for making crepes, Steve Kroll has a carbon steel pan that he bought for many uses. Carbon steel is similar to cast iron in the fact that it needs seasoning. It differs in weight, however, in being much lighter. If you want to read any of Steve's posts about his pan, I found one you can use as a starting point, then feel free to search around if you want more information.
The anodized aluminum nonstick pans I have have traditional nonstick interiors. The anodized portion is only on the outside, with Teflon or similar on the inside.

I wouldn't believe that simply anodizing would be all that durable. We used to hard anodize some parts on the machinery I made parts for, but it still scratched fairly easily when scraped with steel. It had to be used in the right application. Certainly tougher than bare aluminum, but not anything I'd trust to hold up as a cooking surface unless used with the proper tools, just like traditional nonstick.
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