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Old 06-04-2016, 06:58 AM   #21
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I just use the chef's knife. Never really thought about effort required. That is probably because I'm used to dealing with things like yucca, which I believe is even harder to cut through.
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Old 06-04-2016, 08:36 AM   #22
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When slicing a sweet spud, I use my ten inch chef's knife and start the middle of the knife belly on the middle of the sweet potato. I let the veggie sit on the cutting board and give it a light chop. This allows the knife to penetrate the skin enough so that the knife stabilizes the sweet potato as I force it through to the cutting board. Knife control is what controls the sweet potato. Control the pitch of the blade and your knife will slice cleanly, and safely.

If you can't get the hang of it with a knife, try a splitting mawl.

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Old 06-04-2016, 10:42 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8 View Post
Thanks Andy! I think increasing the temp from 375 to 400 will speed things up a bit. I noticed that when I use the middle rack of the toaster oven the potatoes cook faster. I would have thought they would cook faster on the bottom rack closer to the heat source. Why would that be?


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Heat rises. The top rack on a conventional oven is always hotter than the bottom. Depending on how the heat source is configured, you might get some overcooking or even burning on the bottom of a dish that is too close to the heat source, while the top part of the dish is still underdone. For most ovens the top rack position is the hottest place.

This is why so many baking recipes specify using the middle rack. The heat is more consistent, and most ovens are temperature calibrated to the middle. It is also why convection ovens tend to cook faster than conventional - they keep the heat level even throughout the entire cooking space.
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Old 06-04-2016, 11:36 AM   #24
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I'm not sure if anyone here has suggested this but here goes.

I have an absolutely beautiful chef's knife from Miyabi and I treat it like my non-existent first born child. It cuts through most things with ease, but I have always found using a knife with a slightly serrated edge to be much more helpful. In terms of yams and sweet potatoes, I use a victorinox serrated utility knife that my local kitchenware shop gave to members for free (rrp is around 9 AUD). I find that they saw through the potato with relative ease.

Another option would be a scalloped knife, to avoid the starch from the potato sticking to your knife.

Lastly, sweet potatoes are perfectly fine to just wrap in foil and toss into an oven, let's not expose our fingers to any unnecessary risk :)


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Old 06-04-2016, 08:41 PM   #25
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I'm not sure if anyone here has suggested this but here goes.

I have an absolutely beautiful chef's knife from Miyabi and I treat it like my non-existent first born child. It cuts through most things with ease, but I have always found using a knife with a slightly serrated edge to be much more helpful. In terms of yams and sweet potatoes, I use a victorinox serrated utility knife that my local kitchenware shop gave to members for free (rrp is around 9 AUD). I find that they saw through the potato with relative ease.

Another option would be a scalloped knife, to avoid the starch from the potato sticking to your knife.

Lastly, sweet potatoes are perfectly fine to just wrap in foil and toss into an oven, let's not expose our fingers to any unnecessary risk :)


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Can you post a link to the serrated Victorinox utility knife you have? Also, is it okay to wrap sweet potatoes in foil when baking them in a toaster oven? Some people suggest poking a few holes in them and baking without foil.


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Old 06-04-2016, 08:44 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
If you can't get the hang of it with a knife, try a splitting mawl.



Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

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Old 06-04-2016, 09:25 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8 View Post
Can you post a link to the serrated Victorinox utility knife you have? Also, is it okay to wrap sweet potatoes in foil when baking them in a toaster oven? Some people suggest poking a few holes in them and baking without foil.


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http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...utility+knife+

Here you go! This is an excellent brand of knives often recommended by American Test Kitchen. I have their chef knife and it was right in my rather low price range.
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Old 06-04-2016, 09:34 PM   #28
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http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...utility+knife+

Here you go! This is an excellent brand of knives often recommended by American Test Kitchen. I have their chef knife and it was right in my rather low price range.

Thanks Addie! This looks like a great knife but the reviews imply that it wouldn't be sturdy enough to cut a raw sweet potato. What do you think?


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Old 06-05-2016, 01:23 AM   #29
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Thanks Addie! This looks like a great knife but the reviews imply that it wouldn't be sturdy enough to cut a raw sweet potato. What do you think?


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I only have thier chef knife. So I can't speak for this utility knife. You might want to take a look at all of the knives by this maker.

This will take you to their main page so you can see all of their products.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_pg_1?...XO8,B00MAOIJNE

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Old 06-05-2016, 07:26 AM   #30
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I have to agree with whoever wrote you shouldn't try to cut it straight down, but start with an angled slicing motion. We were watching Jacques Pepin the last weekend and he was slicing corn off the cob and said to cut it off holding the knife at an angle, that it was always easier to cut anything that way. So happens I needed to cut corn off the cob later, tried it that way and he was 100% correct. Will have to work on retraining myself to do it that way but it is definitely easier and the corn doesn't bounce everywhere nearly as much either because you don't have to use so much force to cut it off. JP gives such good tips.

Also, if I'm feeling lazy (don't want to dirty and have to wash another knife) and am using a smaller knife, I'll start cutting from the middle to one end, flip it around and do the other side. Comes out straight enough for potatoes.
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