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Old 06-05-2016, 07:35 AM   #31
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One caveat here that I'm not sure anyone has mentioned, the harder force you have to use the more chance of hurting yourself (cutting), sometimes badly. That's why you are supposed to keep your knives sharp, pay attention to what you are doing, and use the correct size knife for your project.

We all can be bad about not always doing any or all of the above, either because we are in a hurry or because we are being lazy, but it never hurts to be reminded.
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Old 06-05-2016, 09:55 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
I have to agree with whoever wrote you shouldn't try to cut it straight down, but start with an angled slicing motion. We were watching Jacques Pepin the last weekend and he was slicing corn off the cob and said to cut it off holding the knife at an angle, that it was always easier to cut anything that way. So happens I needed to cut corn off the cob later, tried it that way and he was 100% correct. Will have to work on retraining myself to do it that way but it is definitely easier and the corn doesn't bounce everywhere nearly as much either because you don't have to use so much force to cut it off. JP gives such good tips.

Also, if I'm feeling lazy (don't want to dirty and have to wash another knife) and am using a smaller knife, I'll start cutting from the middle to one end, flip it around and do the other side. Comes out straight enough for potatoes.
The whole slicing at an angle thing has been understood for a long time.
sen you slice at an angle, the surface area of the blade touches the item to be sliced is smaller, and so more pressure is applied per square inch. Many mandolins take advantage of this and angle two blades in a v-shape. It's the same reason we slice with a knife. also, the knife edge is moving respective to the food being sliced. Chopping is sufficient for small foods such as carrots, green onions, and such. But even soft foods like raw onion are better sliced than chopped. When you use a chopping motion, more of the onion cells get crushed, spraying onion juice into the air. That's what make your eyes water. If you slice with a sharp knife, more of the juice stays in the onion, resulting in no tears and irritation to your eyes.

Slicing, where possible, may not be quite as faast as chopping, but is much more efficient. Try chopping fresh bread sometime from an uncut loaf. Good luck with that. A smooth, sharp knife will slice fresh bread easily, without tearing it as serrated knives do.

Yep, sllicing at an angle is much more effective. Why do you thing guillotines were designed with angled blades?

I know, I'm being weird again.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 06-05-2016, 01:57 PM   #33
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I found that it is easier to cut sweet potato across rather than the lengthwise. I do use big knife anyway and rinse it before use, it slides better


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Old 06-05-2016, 03:45 PM   #34
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I found that it is easier to cut sweet potato across rather than the lengthwise. I do use big knife anyway and rinse it before use, it slides better


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Great idea to rinse the knife first. I'll try cutting the sweet potato across and then halving each piece. Easier slicing and faster cooking!


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Old 06-05-2016, 03:48 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
The whole slicing at an angle thing has been understood for a long time.

sen you slice at an angle, the surface area of the blade touches the item to be sliced is smaller, and so more pressure is applied per square inch. Many mandolins take advantage of this and angle two blades in a v-shape. It's the same reason we slice with a knife. also, the knife edge is moving respective to the food being sliced. Chopping is sufficient for small foods such as carrots, green onions, and such. But even soft foods like raw onion are better sliced than chopped. When you use a chopping motion, more of the onion cells get crushed, spraying onion juice into the air. That's what make your eyes water. If you slice with a sharp knife, more of the juice stays in the onion, resulting in no tears and irritation to your eyes.



Slicing, where possible, may not be quite as faast as chopping, but is much more efficient. Try chopping fresh bread sometime from an uncut loaf. Good luck with that. A smooth, sharp knife will slice fresh bread easily, without tearing it as serrated knives do.



Yep, sllicing at an angle is much more effective. Why do you thing guillotines were designed with angled blades?



I know, I'm being weird again.



Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

Do you know if he has any videos demonstrating slicing at an angle? I saw one video of him demonstrating basic knife skills but didn't see him slicing any of the foods at an angle.


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Old 06-10-2016, 06:15 PM   #36
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Yes, you can use foil in your toaster oven.
Easiest way to cut a sweet potato for baking: remember to put it in the oven earlier. Then you don't have to cut it for baking.

Now personally, I prefer steamed to baked sweet potatoes.
And they slide out of their skins so nicely.
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