"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cook's Tools
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-18-2004, 03:53 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 1
Boiling water the right way

Question for those of you who may be knowledgable in ultimate cooking. I am looking for the name of a tool that I provide a description for below:

As you know many recipies call for bringing the water to a boil and then putting in whatever you're cooking. However, as you put something in the boiling water the water stops boiling and you have to wait for it to come back to boil. Now, on some occasions, for ultimate cooking that is not acceptable.

Allegedly there is a tool that looks like a hammer or a mace, most likely made of copper or another highly heat conductive material. That copper mace gets heated up beforehand to a very high temperature. Now, the technique is to place that super hot mace in the water at the same time as you are putting in the edibles. The mace adds abundance of heat to compensate for the loss of heat by the edibles, and thus not interrupting the beautiful process of boiling.

Question: What is the name of that tool?

__________________

__________________
UltimateBoiling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2004, 04:42 PM   #2
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 843
I don't specifically know the name of the tool for that use, but I know you can use what the French call a Salamander to do what you want. The original Salamander was a thick disc of iron (steel) welded to a rod. You heated the disc until it was red hot and you held it over whatever you were going to caramelize, such as the sugar topping of creme brulee. I've seen people use this same tool to plunge into water.
__________________

__________________
Psiguyy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2004, 06:26 PM   #3
Head Chef
 
Audeo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Texas
Posts: 1,871
I'm curious to know what you are making in which it is unacceptable to wait for the water to return to a boil??

By the way, WELCOME to the board!

In addition to Psiguyy's brilliance, I know there are electric pots dedicated to this quandry that will heat the water to the boiling point and keep it there! (And they are cheap, too.)
__________________
Pain is inevitable. Suffering is Optional.
Audeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2004, 09:12 PM   #4
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 843
Audeo, Julia Child did this when she boiled green beans. She said bringing the pot back to a boil keeps the beans green.
__________________
Psiguyy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2004, 06:32 AM   #5
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
Hate to sound "too Canadian" here. but couldn't you just use an electric kettle to achieve this (given the volume of water was not that extreme?)

Bring the kettle to a boil, then "over boil it" so its throwing steam like mad, and add it and your ingrdient to a pre-heated pot?

Wow, though! Terribly fussy recipe!

Lifter
__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2004, 08:37 AM   #6
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
I am not sure, but I think you might be talking about an immersion heater. We used to use them in summer camp to heat water to make soup. I think they also use them in prison.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2004, 11:11 AM   #7
Head Chef
 
Audeo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Texas
Posts: 1,871
Quote:
Originally Posted by Psiguyy
Audeo, Julia Child did this when she boiled green beans. She said bringing the pot back to a boil keeps the beans green.
Ahhh. Thank you, grasshopper! I didn't know that, and appreciate the info!
__________________
Pain is inevitable. Suffering is Optional.
Audeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2004, 07:34 PM   #8
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
This is curious....I can see a couple ways to try to achieve what Ultimate Boiling is trying to achieve...

First, you could use syomething like a pressure cooker to "superheat" the water, and do the physics calculation of adding whatever mass/volume at whatever temperature, that you could stay at or above 212 F once you added the food to be boiled...

But the method you are describing is somewhat similar to "stone Age Cooking" as described best by Jean Auel in the "Cave Bear" series, where you super heat stones and add them to the water of your pot to achieve, or maintain, or preserve the "boil"...nowadays, perhaps a stainless steel fire brick from the BBQ? (held for this precise purpose, of course!) heated on the burners or in the oven, and dropped (carefully!) in to the pot?

I've worked with immersion heaters (in The Army!) and doubt that you would be able to get the necessary "control" with it/them...

But maybe someone's come up with a new technology for the idea?

Lifter
__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2004, 03:48 AM   #9
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 751
One solution is just to use a larger amount of water in a bigger pot, this way the temperature drop would not be as severe and will return to the boil (or stay boiling) quicker.

I just normally use iced water to help vegetables that I blanch in boiling water retain their colour.
__________________
Haggis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2004, 04:44 PM   #10
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 843
Haggis, ice bath works, but the point Julia made was the beans not only retained their color, but did so without having to be plunged into cold water. So, you could have vibrant green HOT beans instead of green cold beans.

I'm guessing here, but it could also result in a healthier bean. I wonder if shorter cooking times results in better nutritional value.

I know my mother's secret to making the best jams and jellies was to cook it as fast as possible without burning the bottom. She claimed it preserved the flavor better. I wonder if the same applies to cooking veggies?
__________________

__________________
Psiguyy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Reverse Osmosis Water Filters Plato Cookware and Accessories 9 03-31-2008 09:51 PM
Anyone got a recipe for making fruit squash? Darkstream Fruit & Nuts 7 02-12-2005 03:03 PM
Oh fudge! Strawberry Shortcake Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy 13 11-17-2004 12:03 PM
Bacon Wrapped Water Chestnuts RAYT721 Appetizers & Hors D'oeuvres 1 09-06-2004 07:28 PM
Sixty Uses For Table Salt Filus59602 General Cooking 3 08-27-2004 10:51 AM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.