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Old 02-18-2014, 07:25 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
I use mine for softening butter when I have a big batch of sandwiches to make. Stand the metal part in boiling water for a few minutes, dry it and mash the 'fridge-cold butter. Less wasteful than the m/wave.

MadCook - Does yours have a company or manufacturer name on it?
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Old 02-19-2014, 04:47 AM   #32
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MadCook - Does yours have a company or manufacturer name on it?
Unfortunately it doesn't have any markings on it and actually I don't believe it came with a drum.

MadCook - do you have one too? Could you post a picture? Yes having researched making Surkal I can't find anything that actually looks like it but I think warming it to melt butter is a good idea. I only do a bit of cooking now and then but I've heard mixing butter with flour for pastry should always be done cold..
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Old 02-19-2014, 06:58 AM   #33
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Step, thank you for letting us know just what the mystery tool is. So often a person will come on here and ask a similar question. When we don't have a definitive answer, we never hear from them again. Did they get an answer elsewhere or not?
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Old 02-19-2014, 10:56 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by Step View Post
Unfortunately it doesn't have any markings on it and actually I don't believe it came with a drum.

MadCook - do you have one too? Could you post a picture? Yes having researched making Surkal I can't find anything that actually looks like it but I think warming it to melt butter is a good idea. I only do a bit of cooking now and then but I've heard mixing butter with flour for pastry should always be done cold..

Step, I also researched making Surkal and Saurkraut and did not see any cooking tools that resembled this one. My son makes saurkraut and never saw this too. I am very interested in kitchen gagets and always look for unusual ones. I would like to know where I can get one of these, but in order to find one online I would need to know either the manufacturer or the actual name of the item.
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Old 02-19-2014, 12:59 PM   #35
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Drum roll please! Mystery solved, a member of the UK crafts forum recognises it as a tool for pressing cabbage!! I really would never have guessed that but it makes perfect sense as she is Norwegian and likes making Surkal (Norwegian Sauaerkraut or fermented cabbage)
The presser tool apparently fits into a oak container or drum designed for use with the tool and is used to press but not over-press cabbage...
That's interesting, but without seeing the entire tool, I'm not really buying into this explanation. Having said that, I can't identify it, either.

I come from a long line of sauerkraut makers on my dad's side of the family - granted, he is German rather than Norwegian, but the concept is the same. I've seen cabbage mashing tools, but generally they are made of wood and resemble the business end of a baseball bat.

Something like this:
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Old 02-19-2014, 01:26 PM   #36
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It looks to me like something that could be used with pastry dough to make the gashes, three at a time, say in a bear claw, or cheese danish. It would be useful for combining chopped apples into dough to make apple fritters as well.

It would be a good tool for breaking up ground beef in the pan, when making something like taco meat, or browned hamburger for a sauce.

I also think it could be a good device for cutting fat into pie dough.

If all else fails, it's a throwing weapon to quickly remove an errant kitty-cat from the dining room table.

Seeeeeeya; chief Longwind of the North
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Old 02-19-2014, 09:04 PM   #37
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Bear Claw Tool made of plastic, but the metal one is similar, apple fritters are mixed with a bench scraper. I've never in 30 years of working in bakeries seen a tool like that.
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Old 02-20-2014, 05:11 AM   #38
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Well I thought I had the answer! I won't give up the search until I find something. I will ask my gran again when I next see her :)

CarolPa - It definitely has no manufacturer or markings on it, I may even try taking to restaurants/cookware shops to ask!
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Old 02-20-2014, 10:24 AM   #39
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Step, it's possible that the woman was right, but it's just not a common item.

It is shaped similar to a pastry cutter but seems too bulky and heavy for that use.

Amazon.com: Winco 5 Blade Pastry Blender, Stainless Steel: Kitchen & Dining
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Old 02-23-2014, 07:41 AM   #40
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I asked my gran and she can't remember what it is for although it seems to be Norwegian and she suggested crimping the edge of pies
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