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Old 08-02-2013, 03:11 PM   #21
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I'm going to try that formula you have for cleaning your board. I find that Garlic is almost impossible to get rid of! (Not you Garlic!) I have washed and scabbed, and sanded, and it just sits there. I suppose I should have a little board for garlic, but I have a small area to work in and I hate have bibs and bobs all over the kitchen. I bet the Vinegar and Lemon Juicw and water will be the ticket!

I still like to oil the board though. being on the Western Prairies with an ambient relative humidity in winter of about 10% for weeks on end, it is hard on wood.
I find that a cut lemon dipped in salt and rubbed on to the garlic-y surface can go a long way to removing the smell - works for onions too.
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Old 08-02-2013, 05:42 PM   #22
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I find that a cut lemon dipped in salt and rubbed on to the garlic-y surface can go a long way to removing the smell - works for onions too.
I should be living in Gilroy, California. In my world you can never have too much garlic. And I don't mind the smell of it at all. I know, I am weird!
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Old 09-02-2013, 10:48 AM   #23
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First - You can over oil a cutting board to the point where the oil leeches or drips from the bottom. That is wasteful. Simply reapply when the area used mostly becimes a different color than the surrounding area.

Second - Wood has no anti-bacterial properties. With end grain the moisture and bacteria on the surface is sucked into the wood fibers where the bacteria die from the lack of moisture.

Third - There is nothing wrong with mineral oil. It can be harmful if inhaled directly into the lungs but so can any other oil. It is in fact a super refined petroleum product and is USDA approved food safe. It is in your baby oil, almost all cosmetics and a host of other daily items we all use. Organic oils will turn rancid over a period of time guaranteed.

Fourth - Waxes like parrafin and bees wax can add some extra water repellency when mixed with mineral oil and used on wooden utensils such as cutting boards. Heat the oil in a double boiler and add the wax until the desired thickness is achieved. Do not heat the oil over direct heat. The flash point can be achieved before you realize it and then you will have a fire to deal with. Bees wax has a flash point of about 165 degrees.
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Old 09-02-2013, 11:03 AM   #24
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Second - Wood has no anti-bacterial properties. With end grain the moisture and bacteria on the surface is sucked into the wood fibers where the bacteria die from the lack of moisture.
That *is* the anti-bacterial property.
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Old 09-02-2013, 11:13 AM   #25
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That *is* the anti-bacterial property.
Exactly.
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Old 09-02-2013, 12:59 PM   #26
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That is a very nice board. What is BBB?

I am reading the posts to DA and we thought of something very funny. We have the can of the Thompson Water Seal in the basement. That would fix the drunken board!

We are only joking. Do not do that!

~Cat
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Old 09-02-2013, 01:14 PM   #27
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That is a very nice board. What is BBB?...
It's a chain store. Bed Bath and Beyond.
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Old 09-02-2013, 02:14 PM   #28
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I have heard of those stores. I thought the BBB was the Better Business Bureau so I could not imagine the selling of kitchen items there.

Thank you!
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Old 03-17-2014, 09:33 AM   #29
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Perhaps it is a matter of semantics.
I believe BoardSMITH is correct in his statement "Wood has no anti-bacterial properties." Note the use of the word "properties".

by drawing the moisture in and suffocating the bacteria is an "action" not a property as if there is some chemical or "property" in the wood that would do this. verb to noun.

ps. I failed high school English.

So aside from all of the above, Thank you all for this thread as I was going to post a question on taking care of my board. I found the answer here!
thanks again all -
love this site
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Old 03-17-2014, 10:08 AM   #30
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Perhaps it is a matter of semantics.
I believe BoardSMITH is correct in his statement "Wood has no anti-bacterial properties." Note the use of the word "properties".

by drawing the moisture in and suffocating the bacteria is an "action" not a property as if there is some chemical or "property" in the wood that would do this. verb to noun.
Property: an attribute, quality, or characteristic of something.

Dryness is the anti-bacterial property of wood.

Quote:
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ps. I failed high school English.
P.S. I am a writer and editor
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