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Old 04-09-2007, 02:54 PM   #1
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Question Cooking Diffuser???

Can a solid cooking diffusser be used on an electric burner? Will it hurt the burner? Will it work?

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Old 04-09-2007, 03:51 PM   #2
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The item you are talking about is also known as a "flame tamer," and any information I've seen refers ONLY to gas burners. I would first check with the manufacturer of your stove before using one. My gut reaction is that it wouldn't be good for the heating coil.
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Old 04-10-2007, 01:33 AM   #3
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To pick up with what Katie suggested ... also check to make sure the diffuser/flame tamer is designed to be used on an electric stovetop.

Just out of curiosity ... why do you think you need one?
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Old 04-10-2007, 04:32 PM   #4
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Hi Katie E,
Thank you for your idea. I will check with the manufacturer. I have an electric Jenn-Air stove. I like to make stews and find if the pot is too big it scortches the bottom. This is what I am trying to avoid. Oh, by the way you are my first time trying any of this on-line chatting stuff, so thanks for the help getting started. I think I will like it.
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Old 04-10-2007, 04:39 PM   #5
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If the pot with the food in it will fit, put it inside a larger pot and that larger pot will act as a diffuser.
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Old 04-10-2007, 04:42 PM   #6
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Barbara, you might want to switch to a different pot. Use one that is very heavy and/or has a multi-clad bottom layer. This will, in effect, act like a heat diffuser. Cast-iron would be a good choice. If you cook a lot of acid-based foods like chili, etc., you might want to use an enamel-coated cast-iron pan. Acid-based foods have a tendency to "mess" with the seasoning on seasoned cast-iron.

Another thing to do is to try cooking at a lower temperature for a longer period of time. It sounds as though you are cooking on a higher temperature than is necessary.


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Old 04-11-2007, 12:20 AM   #7
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Hi Andy M Your response was great, I loved it. I think in this case I may have a bigger problem. I start with the 12 qt. Revereware copper bottom pot, and most of the time I need to transfer the soup/stew to the 20 qt. pot. When that is full I stop. I freeze the soup in containers, so I can pull out what I need, when I need it. Thanks.
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Old 04-11-2007, 01:04 AM   #8
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Okay, Barbara, I see some of your problem. I have many pieces of Revere Ware, including the two you have. The bottoms of them are not thick enough to "buffer" the heat of the cooking you are doing. In this case, I think you need to do what I recommended in my last post if you are not able to use a heat diffuser/flame tamer. Or, cook in smaller batches.
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Old 04-11-2007, 04:54 PM   #9
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Hi Michael, Thanks for your response. I had to stop and think why. Growing up as a child an old friend of my mother had a big black oil stove in the kitchen and always had a pot of soup cooking on the top. When my mother cooked soup she used a very old heavy cast iron pot (I think it was cast iron) and it too sat on the top of a gas stove. It seemed that nothing ever stuck to the bottom of the pot. I have an electriic stove. It's not the same as a gas stove for long slow cooking, so I thought a diffuser would work pretty much the same. No rings in the bottom of the pot!! Thanks. Barbara
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Old 04-11-2007, 07:27 PM   #10
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I will mention only that a metal (tin) teapot if left on the glass stove top electric burners, it will eventually melt on a setting of "8", and stick to it. When removing it, it will also take the glass portion of where it melted with it. Casper
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