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Old 06-18-2014, 05:19 PM   #91
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I can't imagine why a wood cutting board would not last for any length of time. Considering how long our wooden homes last, why would a cutting board not last longer!
The glues sometimes fail. That has happened to me more than once.

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Old 06-25-2014, 06:26 PM   #92
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
The glues sometimes fail. That has happened to me more than once.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Best to have a board cut from a single slab of wood with the grain. That way there's no glue to fail and no seams to catch grotty bits of old food. Neither do they warp - at least mine hasn't through 30 years of cutting, chopping and scrubbing. It's about 18" x 12" and an inch and a bit deep. Not sure what wood it's made of (can't remember) but it's very dense and quite heavy - doesn't half hurt if you accidentally drop it on your foot! Mum and Dad bought it for me for Christmas one year and I think it was quite expensive but it's certainly earned its keep. If you break it down it's probably cost fractions of a penny per use.

I was given a glass chopping board once but I more often use it for serving things than cutting things up. It may be super-hygienic but it's death to even the most robust knife
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Old 06-29-2014, 11:23 AM   #93
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I gave up on wood. It is just so easy to put plastic cutting board into dishwasher and not to worry about dirt or bacteria. I've had mine for several years and it perfectly fine.
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Old 09-10-2014, 04:18 PM   #94
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I use a mix of wood, plasti, and granite. I have a large wood one that is about 50 years old now that is used for bread only, 2 small granite ones perfect for cheese or a small bit of cutting, and a couple large plastic ones I use most. I never use the dishwasher for any of them, with all but the wood, they get a spray of diluted bleach after each use and scrubbed. The wood one gets the crumbs wiped off (and any jam) with a damp cloth, and wiped with butcher block oil when it's dry.
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Old 09-10-2014, 04:27 PM   #95
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I would not use a granite for a cutting surface as it's too hard and will dull your knives quickly.

I use only soft plastic cutting boards that I put into the dishwasher for sanitation.
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Old 09-10-2014, 04:31 PM   #96
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I have wood, plastic, formed, bamboo. I use flexible coloured mats for cutting veggies and fruit. I have butcher-block boards and I have tongue-and-groove boards that I made from leftover cuts from unfinished birch hardwood flooring. I run those through the dw. Like Steve, I clean my cutting boards with bleach. What is more important, IMO, is that you use the board for one thing, swap it out. I use a letter / file holder on my counter to hold my cutting mats and boards. I also have a butcher block "board" from the cut-out of my sink that fits over the sink. To keep the formed boards from slipping on the counter, a damp cloth underneath works well.
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Old 09-10-2014, 04:41 PM   #97
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I have a bamboo cutting board which I love. It's heavy enough not to move and solid enough not to become chopped to bits. Having acquired a couple of more expensive knives, it also doesn't unnecessarily dull their edges.

I wash it by hand very thoroughly and have no qualms about cross-contamination. (And yes, I do have a dishwasher.)

Having tried glass (shudder!) and plastic chopping boards in the past, I will stick with wood.
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Old 09-10-2014, 06:21 PM   #98
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do i need more than one cutting board? i am in the market for a practical cutting board that is also inexpensive. it has been ages since i last looked at cutting boards, so i'm hoping for some help.

for the most part, i use a cutting board for cutting and chopping various vegetables. occasionally, i use one for meats, both cooked and raw.

i have been using the same homemade wooden cutting board most of my adult life. but now my board has become so warped and worn that i really must face the fact that it needs to be replaced.

what kind of cutting board do you like best and use yourself? do you have a separate board for cutting raw meat? is there a material or brand that you would recommend? thanks for your help with this....
For me it has to be wood all the way. I do keep a separate board for meat - just in case.

Wood does not damage the cutting edge of the blades of your knives as almost all other boards do. To a certain extent wood is self-healing so minor cuts are not a problem. Wood is also naturally antiseptic. I remember reading the results of some research done into different types of chopping boards which had found that wooden boards were the most hygienic if cared for properly and I seem to remember that there was something about the enzymes in wood killing off bacteria. (I may be wrong in the details - it was a long time ago!)

If you go for a wooden board you need to choose one which is a single slab, cut along the grain of the wood, not across it, and ideally about an inch thick. Don't choose one which is made of strips of wood because they are inclined to fall apart after a while especially as the board will get wet when you clean it They are usually the cheaper ones or ones made to look pretty rather than be a useful tool for the cook. Incidentally, pine is not a good idea - doesn't last, warps and can release resin and make things taste.

Bamboo is also anti-bacterial but is harder than wood so will wear out your knives. It also has to be laminated to make a board and does not have the longevity of a single slab wooden board.

Plastic are cheap and some are supposed to be anti-microbial but they still get cuts and scratches from your knives and all sorts of grot can embed itself in them. Glass "boards" are also cheap and easy to clean but will ruin any knife used on them, as will marble and granite.

Sadly, the above means you will be buying a more expensive board but on the bright side it will last you a l-o-n-g time. I was given my very expensive chopping board as my 30th birthday present from my parents. I believe it came from a specialist cooks' equipment supplier. My father nearly had a heart attack when told how much it cost but I'm 65 now and use the board daily and it looks as though I'll be bequeathing it to my nearest and dearest in my will

As for care, scrub it after use with hot tap water and a little washing up liquid and rinse well. If it has a lingering smell, for example after using it with onions, fish, etc., scrub it with a weak solution of bleach and water. Stand it up on end to air dry. Don't put it in the dishwasher.
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Old 09-10-2014, 06:27 PM   #99
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The glues sometimes fail. That has happened to me more than once.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
That's why a board made from a solid slab of wood is the one to go for.
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Old 09-10-2014, 06:39 PM   #100
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MC, do you have any links about bamboo being anti-bacterial. I know a lot of people assume it is because wood is. Bamboo isn't wood, it's a grass. I have tried to find out if anyone has done any studies about bamboo and possible anti-bacterial properties. I think the wood does it by desiccating the microbes.

I recently bought a lovely wooden cutting board. I haven't seen any single piece boards for sale. This was from Ikea and made of strips of wood. If it doesn't last years and years, that's okay. It cost about $5!
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