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Old 06-18-2014, 09:43 AM   #81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
I have a thin, flexible plastic overlay I use on top of the Corian cutting board. It's great for picking up chopped stuff and pouring directly into a container, pot, etc. Easily bleached or washed in the DW.
I had a set of those for a while, but they didn't last long. My knife cut slits into them and made them useless.
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Old 06-18-2014, 10:11 AM   #82
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I had a set of those for a while, but they didn't last long. My knife cut slits into them and made them useless.
I had the same problem. I bought a couple of new ones at Ikea. They are a lot thicker and look like they will hold up. I don't use them all that often because they can't go in the dishwasher.
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Old 06-18-2014, 10:22 AM   #83
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I go through cutting boards every few months. I could replace them every few weeks but that's ridiculous.
Are you using some sort of disposable cutting boards?
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Old 06-18-2014, 10:39 AM   #84
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I honestly don't know what's "best" from a sanitation perspective. I've read lots of conflicting studies. I do know what works best in my kitchen, though.

I have a large butcher block cutting board with a juice catcher that I use for meat. Even if it fit in the dishwasher, it isn't dishwasher safe. So it gets hand washed in a sink full of water to which chlorine bleach has been added. I've been amazed at how well it cleans up, and how good it still looks after about 8 years of use.

I use plastic cutting boards for vegetables and most everything else. There is definitely a convenience factor with those. I throw them in the dishwasher, which has a sanitizing cycle. When they get too damaged (or warped from dishwasher heat), I just buy new ones. They are inexpensive, generally last a couple of years, and I don't feel bad when I have to throw one out.
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Old 06-18-2014, 12:04 PM   #85
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I had a set of those for a while, but they didn't last long. My knife cut slits into them and made them useless.

Mine has held up remarkably well, I've had it for years.
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Old 06-18-2014, 03:04 PM   #86
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I'd never use plastic, mainly because it does harbor bacteria, and once they have knife marks, they are almost impossible to thoroughly clean. With wood, bacteria goes just beneath the surface and dies.

What's important to me is that no vegetable, herb, fruit, etc. is ever cut on a cutting board that has been used for meat!! So cutting boards just for meats, and cutting boards just for... well other things.

I don't mind the tiny plastic type for fruit now and then, but I prefer wood. Keep it clean and oiled it'll last a long time. And it's better for your knives!
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Old 06-18-2014, 03:18 PM   #87
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Something else: I am a huge fan of these Eco Friendly Cutting Boards Made in the USA by Epicurean Cutting Surfaces

They are made from wood pulp and polymers and are durable, dishwasher safe, heat resistant, sandable and extremely durable. You can find them at various retailers and while they cost more up front, these are the last boards you will ever buy.
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Old 06-18-2014, 03:26 PM   #88
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I'd never use plastic, mainly because it does harbor bacteria, and once they have knife marks, they are almost impossible to thoroughly clean. With wood, bacteria goes just beneath the surface and dies.
Does it really?

Below is a link to an article that seems to dispute that claim. Here's an excerpt:
"A thoughtful reader kindly sent me a fascinating article on cutting boards. Originally published in the Feb. 6, 1993 edition of Science News, the article describes research claiming that wooden cutting boards possess some sort of bacteria-killing properties, thus making them less likely to contaminate food than plastic or acrylic cutting boards. "Pathogens prefer plastic," the article declares.

Nearly twenty years later, however, experts are still recommending nonporous plastic cutting boards, and local health departments continue to prohibit the use of wooden cutting boards in commercial foodservice."
Wood Vs. Plastic Cutting Boards: Which is Better?

And another, similar, article:
Cutting Boards and Food Safety

For every article that claims one thing there are other articles that claim the opposite. I honestly think that the most important thing is that as you clean your cutting board after use. Short of that, it doesn't matter all that much whether it's wood or plastic.
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Old 06-18-2014, 04:02 PM   #89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Does it really?



For every article that claims one thing there are other articles that claim the opposite. I honestly think that the most important thing is that as you clean your cutting board after use. Short of that, it doesn't matter all that much whether it's wood or plastic.
This. I use both types. Sometimes my plastic ones go in the dishwasher, other times I hand wash them. It just depends on how my work flow is that day. I do try not to cut raw chicken on a wooden board (and when I do chicken on a plastic board, it usually goes in the dishwasher), but otherwise I don't really worry much about it. I keep them good and clean with hot water and detergent and that seems to do the trick.

One thing I also don't worry about, and that's cutting different things on the same board. As long as they are all being cooked in the same dish, why would it matter if I chop veggies on the same board that I used for the meat? Cooking is cooking and if the dish kills the critters in the meat, it'll kill any that jump from the meat to the veggies. Properly handled, even the meat shouldn't have any active bad guys between prepping and cooking. I don't leave the board or the items that I cut on it sitting around in an incubator for a couple of hours.
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Old 06-18-2014, 04:31 PM   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Does it really?

Below is a link to an article that seems to dispute that claim. Here's an excerpt:
"A thoughtful reader kindly sent me a fascinating article on cutting boards. Originally published in the Feb. 6, 1993 edition of Science News, the article describes research claiming that wooden cutting boards possess some sort of bacteria-killing properties, thus making them less likely to contaminate food than plastic or acrylic cutting boards. "Pathogens prefer plastic," the article declares.

Nearly twenty years later, however, experts are still recommending nonporous plastic cutting boards, and local health departments continue to prohibit the use of wooden cutting boards in commercial foodservice."
Wood Vs. Plastic Cutting Boards: Which is Better?

And another, similar, article:
Cutting Boards and Food Safety

For every article that claims one thing there are other articles that claim the opposite. I honestly think that the most important thing is that as you clean your cutting board after use. Short of that, it doesn't matter all that much whether it's wood or plastic.
This is the article I go by: UC-Davis Food Safety Laboratory: Cutting Board Research

I first read it at least 15 years ago and I believe that this kind of basic science doesn't change. The bacteria-killing property of wood is dryness. It sucks the moisture out of bacteria and then they die.

I'm going to shock everyone, so it's a good thing you're not likely to eat at my house I use my wooden cutting board for everything - meat, poultry, fish, fruits, veggies, etc., unless I need a second and then I grab whichever one - two wood and two acrylic - is the size I need, although I never use acrylic for meat or poultry. If I'm making meat/poultry and veggies, I do the veggies first, spray and wipe the board and do the meat/poultry. If it gets really messy, I clean it in the sink, but typically I spray it with my homemade kitchen spray - 1/3 each of lemon juice, white vinegar and water - then wipe down.

I have a compromised immune system due to medication, so if anyone was going to have a problem with this, it would definitely be me. But DH and I are fine
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