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Old 11-03-2013, 01:00 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by KatyCooks View Post
I thought so Andy - but when it comes to numbers I can be a bit "dyslexic"! (You'd never think I spent the last 20 years using spreadsheets and analysing sales and service levels!)

But yes, I am feeling rather smug about my set of cup measures - nobody else I know has any! (Mind you, that is probably because nobody else I know enjoys cooking...)
Dyslexia has a "sister" condition with number called dyscalculia. Dyscalculics have many of the same problems as dyslexics. For example, I struggle with numbers, confuse left and right (when setting the table I have to actually hold each knife and fork as I would when eating with them, in order to lay them the right way round and I have friends who won't let me navigate when we are travelling), can't follow a charted knitting pattern although I have no problems when the pattern is written out in words and when reading a map I have to have the direction of the map pointing in the direction I'm moving - so the map is often upside down! Oddly enough I don't have problems with spread sheets either.

Dyscalculia can present on its own but is occasionally combined with dyslexia and dyspraxia (a specific speech disability). In most cases dyscalculia is not connected with low intellectual development although it can be.
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Old 11-03-2013, 01:40 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Oh dear, I "measure" my spaghetti by eye although I do have little gauge with three holes in it representing I, 2 or 3 portions but I don't bother with it.

Moving on to where you talk about baking with cups. I cook in ounces so the conversion isn't too much of a hassle but lately when baking I have used a cup measure to "fluff up" and scoop, then level flour to put on the scales. I never get the same measurement twice which I find very confusing.
Don't use Imperial ounces for US recipes, they aren't the same size.

Not getting the same weight consistently for flour by volume is why weight is more accurate. Depending on, among other things, humidity, the flour will fluff or pack together more.
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Old 11-03-2013, 08:45 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
My small cheapo made in China scale can measure down to 6 -7 grams quite accurately. I only wish it would project the lcd output beyond itself, somehow. I end up having peeking under the dish to read the readout window, most every time.
I had the same issue. Plus it's dark under there so it's hard to read the numbers for two reasons. I solved the problem by getting this. The display pulls out and lights up.
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Old 11-03-2013, 09:54 AM   #34
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I have always used scales for cooking but recently started using cup measures. I was a bit flummoxed when confronted with measuring out "1 cup of butter". How do you measure cups in something that is neither dry (like flour and sugar), nor liquid? I suppose you have to wait for the butter to soften enough to scoop into the cup? Anyway, I thought most US recipes called for "sticks" of butter rather than cups?

All I can say is, it was messy! (But I managed).

Oh and yes, the tare feature is marvellously useful.
Hi, Katie. Butter here is generally sold in a 1-pound box with the butter divided into four sticks, each separately wrapped in paper with measurements marked on the paper, so it's easy to determine how much you need. I also have a push-up measuring cup that makes it easy to measure soft, sticky items like peanut butter and honey.
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Old 11-04-2013, 04:51 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Don't use Imperial ounces for US recipes, they aren't the same size.

Not getting the same weight consistently for flour by volume is why weight is more accurate. Depending on, among other things, humidity, the flour will fluff or pack together more.
Don't use Imperial ounces for US recipes, they aren't the same size. I think you may be confusing fluid ounces, which are slightly different, with ounces by weight, which aren't. An ounce by weight of solids, eg butter, sugar, flour, etc., is 1/16th of a pound or approx. 28 grammes in both the USA and the UK. An imperial fluid ounce is 0.96 US fluid ounce. We only use fluid ounces for measuring liquids. There is, of course a big difference (4 ounces between the Imperial pint and the US pint (not sure, off hand, where the Canadian pint stands in this)

Not getting the same weight consistently for flour by volume is why weight is more accurate. Yes, of course. That's why we do it I've noticed on Food Network that American cooks seem to be going over to weighing for baking, presumably because of accuracy.
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Old 11-04-2013, 05:06 PM   #36
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Hi, Katie. Butter here is generally sold in a 1-pound box with the butter divided into four sticks, each separately wrapped in paper with measurements marked on the paper, so it's easy to determine how much you need. I also have a push-up measuring cup that makes it easy to measure soft, sticky items like peanut butter and honey.
I like the idea of your butter coming in stick with all that info on the wrapping paper. And the measure thingy is a fantastic idea. Measuring sticky stuff is a pain when you have to faff about with spoons and scales and mess
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Old 11-04-2013, 05:55 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Don't use Imperial ounces for US recipes, they aren't the same size. I think you may be confusing fluid ounces, which are slightly different, with ounces by weight, which aren't. An ounce by weight of solids, eg butter, sugar, flour, etc., is 1/16th of a pound or approx. 28 grammes in both the USA and the UK. An imperial fluid ounce is 0.96 US fluid ounce. We only use fluid ounces for measuring liquids. There is, of course a big difference (4 ounces between the Imperial pint and the US pint (not sure, off hand, where the Canadian pint stands in this)

Not getting the same weight consistently for flour by volume is why weight is more accurate. Yes, of course. That's why we do it I've noticed on Food Network that American cooks seem to be going over to weighing for baking, presumably because of accuracy.
Canada used to use Imperial measure, but switched to metric in the '70s. Beer is still sometimes sold in Imperial pints, but not much else.

I was thinking fluid measure and yes the ounces are close, I guess I was thinking more of pints/quarts/gallons, which are noticeably different. And of course, the number of ounces in a US fluid quart isn't the same as in an Imperial quart.

I only mentioned measuring flour by volume because you wrote, "... lately when baking I have used a cup measure to "fluff up" and scoop, then level flour to put on the scales. I never get the same measurement twice which I find very confusing."
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Old 11-04-2013, 07:42 PM   #38
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I had the same issue. Plus it's dark under there so it's hard to read the numbers for two reasons. I solved the problem by getting this. The display pulls out and lights up.
Andy, I have the same scale and love it! Really good product.
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