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Old 04-24-2012, 04:10 PM   #11
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A little update

I've been busy hitting a few flea markets and yard sales, but my best luck was on Ebay. These are not exactly what I was looking for. In fact, they are considerably older than the vintage I first posted. Also, they are old, pure steel, so if you have the bad habit that I do of tossing them in the sink to wash later, you will find the tines highly rusted in less than an hour. I think my original post was stainless steel as they never seem to discolor no matter how long they stay in water.

Steve: Saw the Amazon link, but alas, they are 3 tines. Just don't know what is so hard about 4, but it certainly is a challenge.....and I wonder why all the culinary tool manufacturers decided that 3 is the way to go. Cheaper to produce maybe?

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Old 04-24-2012, 04:38 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atty View Post
I've been busy hitting a few flea markets and yard sales, but my best luck was on Ebay. These are not exactly what I was looking for. In fact, they are considerably older than the vintage I first posted. Also, they are old, pure steel, so if you have the bad habit that I do of tossing them in the sink to wash later, you will find the tines highly rusted in less than an hour. I think my original post was stainless steel as they never seem to discolor no matter how long they stay in water.

Steve: Saw the Amazon link, but alas, they are 3 tines. Just don't know what is so hard about 4, but it certainly is a challenge.....and I wonder why all the culinary tool manufacturers decided that 3 is the way to go. Cheaper to produce maybe?

Interesting patterns. Might well date back to the early 1900s. A lot of that stuff was originally tin plated. I have a couple that have tine wear like the bottom specimen. The roots of the tines can be a bear to keep clean.
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Old 04-24-2012, 06:05 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atty View Post
Just don't know what is so hard about 4, but it certainly is a challenge.....and I wonder why all the culinary tool manufacturers decided that 3 is the way to go. Cheaper to produce maybe?
The forks had different purposes and wasn't an issue of cheaper. The Granny Fork, as I grew up with 60+ years ago, had 3 tines and a longer straight length since it was used to reach across the stove or across the table when passing food to a plate. The 4 tine fork is a regular table fork for eating, a meat fork as someone mentioned earlier. The 2 tine fork was for carving. I had no experience with the multi-tined 'Foley' Fork, but it seems to have more uses around the stove, useful as a cooking fork and more versatile than a slotted spoon.
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Old 04-25-2012, 01:19 AM   #14
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The forks had different purposes and wasn't an issue of cheaper. The Granny Fork, as I grew up with 60+ years ago, had 3 tines and a longer straight length since it was used to reach across the stove or across the table when passing food to a plate. The 4 tine fork is a regular table fork for eating, a meat fork as someone mentioned earlier. The 2 tine fork was for carving.......
I will have to agree. I've even come across some sales listings that are allegedly for some civil war utensils that appear to be the same vintage. I guess my question was: Why is there no manuf. for 4 tines now? As Schazz points out, there are plenty of places for 3 tines, but 4 seems to have been relegated to the history books. The 4 tine is far more flexible than a 3, and to me, far more versatile, but then again, I grew up on two of those in the original post, so it may just be me. Just seems strange that the producers today have seem to have accepted a 3 as the standard in that size.
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Old 04-25-2012, 02:04 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by atty View Post
I've been busy hitting a few flea markets and yard sales, but my best luck was on Ebay. These are not exactly what I was looking for. In fact, they are considerably older than the vintage I first posted. Also, they are old, pure steel, so if you have the bad habit that I do of tossing them in the sink to wash later, you will find the tines highly rusted in less than an hour. I think my original post was stainless steel as they never seem to discolor no matter how long they stay in water.

Steve: Saw the Amazon link, but alas, they are 3 tines. Just don't know what is so hard about 4, but it certainly is a challenge.....and I wonder why all the culinary tool manufacturers decided that 3 is the way to go. Cheaper to produce maybe?

If you are looking for a particular pattern, like the OP, you might send a photo and description to Replacements, Ltd, in NC. It is amazing what they have around.

Some, if not all those you posted appear to have bone handles. I would be careful about leaving them in water. Bone will crack and warp.
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Old 04-25-2012, 02:00 PM   #16
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My mother had a three-tined "granny fork" that she got from her grandfather, and she used it while I was growing up until it was ready to fall apart. This fork was built like a knife, in that the shank went straight down through the handle to the bottom of the fork. In 1968 or so, I found a fork made by Case, which they do not make anymore by the way, that had the three tines, was almost the same size, and had the same kind of shank, so I bought one for her for her birthday and she bought one for me for Christmas. I now have both the forks, and of all the neat stuff in my kitchen, those two forks are the most important to me.
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Old 10-01-2012, 02:10 PM   #17
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i remembered this place...i hope it might help

Kitchen Fork available at The Vermont Country Store
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