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Old 01-11-2017, 10:40 AM   #31
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Go to the hardware store and buy a piece of PVC pipe in the size you want. Buy a polycarbonate cutting board from Wal-Mart, K-Mart, BBB, etc. Buy a jig saw (if you don't already have one or a friend doesn't) and cut out a round to fit your PVC pipe. Alternatively, depending on the size of the PVC, by a hole saw and use your drill to cut out your pusher. You can then cut a rectangular piece off the cutting board and screw it to the pusher with stainless screws (Marine hardware store) so you'll have a handle. You can purchase a metal file if you need to file the pusher piece down to fit inside the PVC, and a fine metal file to smooth the edges of the cut PVC and pusher piece.

Even with the cost of a large hole saw and metal files, the above will be a LOT cheaper than $300 K.

You might even go to a place that makes signs and see if they have any scrap heavy-duty polycarbonate they'll let you have or even cut it for you.
Had another thought, you can set the above on a silicone ridged bake or draining mat, form your patties, then pop them in the freezer on the mat so they'll freeze with the ridges you want, then just peel them off the mat and store in a bag or container in the freezer until you want them.
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Old 01-11-2017, 10:46 AM   #32
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https://www.amazon.com/Wilton-2308-0.../dp/B006ZWAFY8
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Old 01-11-2017, 10:52 AM   #33
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If those are the ones I have (box long gone) and I suspect they are given 1 of the reviews, wouldn't recommend them. They are flimsy and easily bent.
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Old 01-14-2017, 04:23 AM   #34
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There's a connection between the common diameter of patty presses for sale, the limited 2 sizes of hamburger buns for sale and the few companies that bake bread for all the US. Seriously, 60 minutes should do a story on the bakers of bread. It might blow your mind someday. The Masonic Bakers. There are 3 or 4 main bakeries that bake all the bread we eat. It's all labeled under different brands. Francisco brand no longer carries French Rolls, 12 pack. I liked those. It was a directive from the bakery, lol.

I'm just saying, Roman soldiers ate up to 6 lbs. of bread a day. That sustained the empire fine for a long time.
Stay tuned for some future episode of 60 minutes that explores just how "heavy" the bread industry is. They may portray it as almost Masonic like, in ways. That wouldn't surprise me.
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Old 01-14-2017, 11:25 AM   #35
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Those Roman soldiers ate healthy, whole grain, preservative free bread. I'm betting that it was often stale, dry and hard to swallow, but they did not have to deal with the refined carbs that modern bread is made from. If the modern bread bakers made bread like those soldiers had, nobody would buy it.

I'm not saying it's good or bad - that depends somewhat on your own intake - but most bread in the grocery store is not particularly healthy. That's true of most of the carb heavy foods that they sell - flour, rice, etc., are all processed to death. I try to buy mostly breads that advertise as being "whole grain", but I can tell from the texture that there is more than just whole grain flour being used. I just try to go easy on it, although sometimes I get cravings that I simply can't deny.
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Old 01-14-2017, 12:56 PM   #36
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Those Roman soldiers ate healthy, whole grain, preservative free bread. I'm betting that it was often stale, dry and hard to swallow, but they did not have to deal with the refined carbs that modern bread is made from. If the modern bread bakers made bread like those soldiers had, nobody would buy it.

I'm not saying it's good or bad - that depends somewhat on your own intake - but most bread in the grocery store is not particularly healthy. That's true of most of the carb heavy foods that they sell - flour, rice, etc., are all processed to death. I try to buy mostly breads that advertise as being "whole grain", but I can tell from the texture that there is more than just whole grain flour being used. I just try to go easy on it, although sometimes I get cravings that I simply can't deny.
I'm betting they also had a very crude, unrefined wine in which to dunk that stale bread.
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Old 01-14-2017, 03:58 PM   #37
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Lol. I try and promote my conspiracy theory about a monopoly a few bread makers may try for, and, all you two can reply with is the health of bread today and the quality of wine back then. Hehehe. Bread is good. Roman soldiers ate 6 lbs. of it a day. It's definitely a staple of our modern society. I say there's something fishy about bread bakeries as it is. There's 4 bakery companies baking bread for 300+ million Americans, and it will probably be reduced to 2 in the next decade.

If you can't get a bread product you were used to, it's by dictate of the relatively few bakeries, not because that product wasn't selling well. Orowheat, Sara Lee, Francisco, Wonder Bread and other familiar bread companies have to take what the major bakeries offer.

End of conspiracy rant.
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Old 01-15-2017, 01:49 AM   #38
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This might blow your mind, Cas, but my old neighborhood used to have at least 5 small bread bakeries in it. Right in the middle of regular suburban houses.

I could never understand how the folks who lived next door to them could stand the delicious smell all day long.
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Old 01-29-2017, 06:44 AM   #39
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The idea that so much bread is made by relatively few bakeries. Scary, in a way. I propose that there is a Masonic type thing going on with bakeries. Mark my words. A 60 Minutes worthy peek behind the scenes should be produced. End of conspiracy rant.
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Old 01-30-2017, 04:09 AM   #40
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This might blow your mind, Cas, but my old neighborhood used to have at least 5 small bread bakeries in it. Right in the middle of regular suburban houses.

I could never understand how the folks who lived next door to them could stand the delicious smell all day long.
My kids grew up with an Italian baker just a short block away. In the summer loaves started to come out of the ovens around 8 p.m. I would have the money right in my pocket and they would get a clean towel and run down there. Get a loaf or two, come back and sit on the front steps. I would give them stick of butter and they would have a feast for themselves. This was a summer long ritual. When school started it ended. Was it fattening? I doubt it. The kids were busy playing Red Rover, Red Rover, Come Over. Or stick ball or any number of other street games that kept them running. In the winter it was going to our local skating rink.

Try letting your kids play outside today. Someone will surely report you for neglect and putting your children in danger.
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