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Old 01-17-2015, 06:17 PM   #11
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I am going to have to say take that $15 a glove will cost you and take a cooking class where they can show you how to handle you knife...

Get the correct knife for the job, use a cutting board that is not going to move around, and go slow.
Its hard to tell you how to cut without showing you, I am sure there are vids on the web that show good technique, but the best way is to get in front of someone let them show you and correct you as you go..

Cutting meat is different than cutting veggies, especially if you are buy entire parts and trimming and cutting the cuts yourself. I took a $600 course that taught me how to cut, carve, tie, pre, roll, every kind of roast, rack, rib, stuffed roll, you can think of, it was so worth $600, it took 3 weeks for the class but Ill never forget that stuff and use it all the time...

good luck
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Old 01-17-2015, 06:54 PM   #12
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Back when there were a lot of cooking shows on TV, it was easy to view proper techniques. Many chefs even took the time to explain the details of proper technique. Not just for knives but other basics as well.
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Old 01-17-2015, 08:14 PM   #13
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I took a class quite a few years ago at the Cook Street school in Denver on Classic Techniques: Essentials 1. four weeknights, about 3 hours each, covering a different essential topic in each session. First was eggs, from how to break one to making the perfect omelette to making mayonnaise from scratch. Second was knife skills, stressing proper technique and learning the definitions for terms like dice, chop, mince, julienne, etc. Third was grilling and cold sauces. Fourth night was roasting meats. In each class part of the fun was that you ultimately made dinner using the things you learned that day.

Such classes won't guarantee that you never cut yourself - I'm living proof of that - but it definitely helps to know what's right when using a knife. Like someone said earlier, one of the best ways not to cut yourself is to keep your knives sharp. And you don't have to look like a professional chef - slow down and take your time.
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Old 01-18-2015, 07:11 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by chardc2 View Post
How about using one of these beauties ! Some say the slap-chop is a gimmick, but I always thought it looked fun.

My other thought is simple guards such as these :

Safe Slice Knife Guard - Contemporary - by Walter Drake

Finger Guard

Fairly cheap and may be worth a go if safety is your concern!
Nothing new under the sun. My grandma had a similar chopping gadget back in the 1950s and I have a cheap one that I bought in Ikea a few years ago (not the same make). I love it. It's great for chopping small amounts of onion, herbs, etc., quickly without making a mess as it has a little holder on the bottom for the thing you're chopping. Mine's no trouble to clean as it goes in the dishwasher and it lives on the counter next to my chopping board as I use it most days.
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Old 01-18-2015, 08:02 AM   #15
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Somehow I only manage to cut myself by accident. I mean not when I do actual cutting, rather when I pick up a knife or am putting it in the sink, or some other odd situation.


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Old 01-18-2015, 10:24 AM   #16
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Somehow I only manage to cut myself by accident. I mean not when I do actual cutting, rather when I pick up a knife or am putting it in the sink, or some other odd situation.


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Same for me too, Charlie.
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Old 01-18-2015, 11:19 AM   #17
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Somehow I only manage to cut myself by accident. I mean not when I do actual cutting, rather when I pick up a knife or am putting it in the sink, or some other odd situation.


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Same for me too, Charlie.
Really, the stupidest thing one can do is place a sharp knife in the sudsy dishwater (I speak from experience), then turn away to do something else and forget it's there. I never even let go of a knife once I start to wash it. Before it leaves my hand, I wash, rinse, dry and put it away or set it safely aside until needed again.
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Old 01-18-2015, 11:32 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
Really, the stupidest thing one can do is place a sharp knife in the sudsy dishwater (I speak from experience), then turn away to do something else and forget it's there. I never even let go of a knife once I start to wash it. Before it leaves my hand, I wash, rinse, dry and put it away or set it safely aside until needed again.
No one said anything about putting a knife in sudsy dishwater.

My point was that I seldom cut myself in the act of using the knife (cutting, slicing, chopping, etc). For me it happens in a random movement or a careless handling while washing, etc. that leads to a nick.

Overall, I believe you cut yourself when you are careless, rather than because your knife is sharp, dull or in between.
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Old 01-18-2015, 12:32 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
Really, the stupidest thing one can do is place a sharp knife in the sudsy dishwater (I speak from experience), then turn away to do something else and forget it's there. I never even let go of a knife once I start to wash it. Before it leaves my hand, I wash, rinse, dry and put it away or set it safely aside until needed again.
When I cook for 40-80 people a lot of times I simply have no time to wash knives. I need to switch kwik from knife I was using to cut chicken to chop vegetables, or to slice fish.
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Old 01-18-2015, 12:32 PM   #20
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No one said anything about putting a knife in sudsy dishwater.

My point was that I seldom cut myself in the act of using the knife (cutting, slicing, chopping, etc). For me it happens in a random movement or a careless handling while washing, etc. that leads to a nick.

Overall, I believe you cut yourself when you are careless, rather than because your knife is sharp, dull or in between.
Which is why I brought it up. I wasn't replying to a particular comment from anyone else, just adding my own idea of one of the easiest ways to cut yourself accidentally. You and Charlie both mentioned accidents, so I was simply expanding on the topic.
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