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Old 08-12-2005, 11:22 PM   #1
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I hate silicone...

Recently got 2 of the new silicone 'pastry' brushes and they are fantastic! No more picking out bristles from the pastry or BBQ! They do look a little weird, tho!

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Old 08-12-2005, 11:24 PM   #2
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So, they are worth the $ then? I have been debating whether or not to get some.
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Old 08-13-2005, 06:29 AM   #3
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Yes! They're really no more expensive than a good pastry brush. Try Target or Bed, Bath and Beyond.
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Old 08-13-2005, 10:20 AM   #4
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We don't have any of those up here. I will try WalMart though, failing that, some of our department stores should have them.
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Old 08-14-2005, 09:34 AM   #5
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I bought one at BB&B.... it is a stroke of genius. It was only $5, works great. I used it first to paint olive oil on quartered zuchini before grilling, and I think it was actually easier to paint on a very thin coat of oil that it ever was with any of my old brushes. And it didn't tend to push the pieces all over the plate (didn't even have to hold on to them)... it was more flexible than a standard brush.

I plan on picking up a couple more of them...
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Old 08-14-2005, 12:13 PM   #6
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmalady
Recently got 2 of the new silicone 'pastry' brushes and they are fantastic! No more picking out bristles from the pastry or BBQ! They do look a little weird, tho!
-- You pick out the bristles? I've always viewed them as a good source of dietary fibre.

I'm wary of "plastics" in cooking. The silcon spatula says it's safe to 350 F, but I don't use it to stir a pot. I finally bought a non-stick pan, for omlettes and crepes, but nothing else.

It took some searching to find a wok that wasn't non-stick coated.

I know people who microwave food in various plastic containers. I can't help but think about all those plastic molecules that are forming chemical bonds with the food.

And you put anything oily in a plastic container and it seems that the container is "forever oiled."

So, kitchenware for me is by and large stainless, pyrex, cast iron, ceramic, wood. I have silicon spatulas, and melanine utensiles for the non-stick pan, but I don't trust them to be heated much.

-- Maybe I'm wrong on all this?
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Old 08-14-2005, 12:39 PM   #7
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I have a silicone spatula/spoon that is rated at 450' F. It has lived up to its claim. I use it for stir-frying, and moving around foods in sauces and such. It's also great for getting the last bits of sauce from a pan, or mayo from the jar.

On the downside, it has an affinity for soap and is difficult to get to nutrality. That is, if I'm not very careful, it can have enough of a soap residue left on it to spoil a good dish. It is too flexible for scraping food that is jsut starting to stick to a pot. a good nylon, or steel spatula does that better.

It has its place in my kitchen, but is not the super-tool I thought it was going to be. And it has to be meticulously rinced with hot and fresh water after washing.

The basting brushes seem like a very good idea though. I will be getting one soon.

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Old 08-14-2005, 08:23 PM   #8
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Goodweed - I had a similar problem with my first silicone spatula that was only rated up to 350-F ... but I don't have that problem with my new ones (from another company I guess) that are rated for 650-F. Something different in the composition that doesn't have that chemical affinity for soap.

I'm glad to hear the success stories about the silicone brushes. I've tried nylon and the regular hair brushes and just never felt I was really getting them clean when I washed, and washed, and washed them and often threw them out and replaced them after 2-3 uses. The silicone brushes, like the silicone baking mats, will save me money in the long run.

Daphne - if the plastic is "food grade" then the plastic molecules are not bonding to the food. The only bonding that is going on, as you noted about when you put something oily into plastic and it stays oily forever, is that the plastic and fat are such closely related chemical cousins that the oil bonds to the plastic - even without heat. This is more common with softer, more flexible, plastics (such as that used in Ziplock and GladWare containers). This can also be a problem with nylon, to a somewhat lesser degree depending on its formulation. This is not a problem with a rigid plastic like polycarbonate. It's also not a problem for silicone.

My favorite cooking utensils are wood. For my nonstick pans it's with wood or silicone. For everything else ..... primarily wood but I will use metal for SS or cast iron when I need to.
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Old 08-16-2005, 01:46 AM   #9
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I totally agree with your comments Michael.

I prefer to use SS in my wok, especially for my fried rice (My only 100% success ) Nothing like the clang of a hard working wok.

Mind you, I've been on the look out for a SS pallette knife, and have had to settle for a silicon job.

Now speaking of the various materials, horses for courses (if you will), what about implants? Silicone, wood or stainless steel?
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Old 08-16-2005, 08:07 AM   #10
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LMAO on your last question, Brooksy. Silicone has been shown to be rubbish. Go for the wood if you like a natural, organic look and the stainless if your taste runs to sleek and contemporary.
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