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Old 10-09-2008, 10:19 AM   #11
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I have the kind of spinner that has a knob on top--you push down a couple of times and that gets the basket spinning.

I fill the basket with the greens I am going to use, put the basket in the bowl, and fill with water. I lift and swoosh the greens around, and then lift the basket out of the bowl. Dump the water and any grit out of the bowl, and do it again if I think I need to. I don't use the spinning action to wash the lettuce, just to spin it dry.

I put the spinner in the sink when I use it. Having it lower than counter top level makes it easier to push the knob, (I am a shorty) and the sink keeps it from "walking" off the counter, so I can get it started and then walk away.
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Old 10-09-2008, 11:44 AM   #12
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I could not wash rice in the salad spinner I have as the open spaces are way too big. I measure my water for my rice using my fingers so it's ok if there is still some water in the pan. HOWEVER, for someone that measured water, and could wash their rice in a mesh-type spinner, that would be perfect! I just don't know how well a mesh container would remove a lot of the moisture though. AND I see where Jenny has already addressed this issue and she is correct. Rice does not have to be dry.

I wash any herb that won't fall through. I have put a paper towel inside the spinner if I am using a mixture of herbs that might slip through. The centrifugal force works quite well with the paper towels.

If it's a large amount of lettuce/greens I will rinse in the sink first then dry in the spinner. If it's just a handful of greens I toss in the spinner, rinse under running water tossing around the greens, then spin.

The benefit to washing greens and such in the sink (leeks included) is to fill the sink with enough water that the greens float and the dirt sinks. THEN I use the spinner to dry. So no, a spinner does not work as well for this purpose.

I still may lay out my lettuce after spinning as not every bit of moisture is removed. I lay it out on paper towels then roll up and shake to remove the last of the moisture. I do this especially when making a Caesar Salad (as well as other salads) as I don't want any water on it.
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Old 10-09-2008, 12:21 PM   #13
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What are the brands of spinners you prefer? so many to choose from. Mine was over 20 years old when I had to give it up. Plastic wearing away.
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Old 10-09-2008, 09:15 PM   #14
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Thanks for your responses - some interesting stuff.

Good idea about putting the paper towel in the spinner. Do you find that also stops the herbs from bruising?

What spinning mechanism do you all prefer? Lever, plunger, turning handle, pull string? Have you had the opportunity to try the different kinds?
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Old 10-09-2008, 09:28 PM   #15
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I guess I'm wondering about the need to design a new salad spinner. These have been in the US for decades and tend to be, as I've seen, white elephant gifts rather often. Some people love them and seek them out (like me and the Forman grills) but a lot of people disregard them.

Just a story, FWIW (for what it's worth). 14 years ago we did a gift exchange at work. We drew names and had to come up with White Elephant gifts for the name we drew. A very good friend of mine who was considerably overweight received a salad spinner. To this day, I have definitive connotations of a salad spinner. It broke her heart to receive that.

With that said, I just wonder about the "need" to design a new salad spinner. What I've seen is good, why the desire?
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Old 10-09-2008, 09:33 PM   #16
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I did also find this as a use for the Salad Spinner Unorthodox uses
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Old 10-18-2008, 09:46 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Callisto in NC View Post
I did also find this as a use for the Salad Spinner
Um, thanks for that.
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Old 10-18-2008, 09:56 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tool Designer View Post
What spinning mechanism do you all prefer? Lever, plunger, turning handle, pull string? Have you had the opportunity to try the different kinds?
I have the Oxo model with the plunger. I've tried a couple of others, and most of the other methods require that you hold the spinner with one hand, and activate the spinner mechanism with the other. With the plunger design, you push down directly in the center, so there is no need to use another hand to steady it. You could have your hands tied behind your back and use your chin to spin your greens, were you so inclined.

I too question the need for a new design, but, then, I guess a lot of people have traditionally questioned the need for the next great invention. Go for it. If you can come up with an improvement, I'll certainly be pleased and impressed. :)
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Old 10-18-2008, 10:21 PM   #19
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My mother uses a basket with a string/ small rope and gos outside and just swings it arm over sides to get the water out. I use the turning handle salad spinner.
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Old 10-18-2008, 10:45 PM   #20
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Sometimes I use mine for straining and rinsing cooked pasta.
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