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Old 05-17-2016, 01:12 PM   #1
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ISO alternative to box grater

I used my KitchenAid box grater, using the course side, to make hash browns. It's kind of a pain to clean, so I would like to find a single-sided grater.

I saw this Oxo grater at BBB. Is this course enough for hash browns?
OXO Good Grips® Handheld Coarse Grater - BedBathandBeyond.com

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Old 05-17-2016, 03:26 PM   #2
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It looks like that Oxo thing will do the trick. I use a box grater regularly for cheese, potatoes, carrots, etc. A quick rinse usually gets it clean enough to put in the dishwasher.
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Old 05-17-2016, 03:50 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8 View Post
I used my KitchenAid box grater, using the course side, to make hash browns. It's kind of a pain to clean, so I would like to find a single-sided grater.

I saw this Oxo grater at BBB. Is this course enough for hash browns?
OXO Good Grips® Handheld Coarse Grater - BedBathandBeyond.com
Whenever I use something like that for potatoes, I rinse it immediately so that the starch doesn't set up. Same when I grate cheese. I'll just drop it immediately into the sink of sudsy water that I always have ready when I cook. I wash items like that as I go during breaks in the work cycle. I'll take a minute or so to wash a couple of items. That way I keep the mess under control and final cleanup isn't such a chore.
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Old 05-17-2016, 03:55 PM   #4
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http://www.amazon.com/Vollrath-Sucti...kitchen+kutter

I use this. I got it from my MIL a long time ago. Didn't know they were so expensive! I use it all the time for slicing things thin, grating cheese or potatoes, the biggest cone makes decent french fries. Just pop it in the dishwasher and it all comes out nice and clean.
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Old 05-17-2016, 04:26 PM   #5
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Amazon.com: Vollrath (6005) Suction Cup Base King Kutter(TM) Food Processor w/Cones #1-5: Cheese Shredder: Kitchen & Dining

I use this. I got it from my MIL a long time ago. Didn't know they were so expensive! I use it all the time for slicing things thin, grating cheese or potatoes, the biggest cone makes decent french fries. Just pop it in the dishwasher and it all comes out nice and clean.
Kinda funny, but when you read the reviews on Amazon, they are either glowing or they call it totally useless - not much in between. Maybe there are some quality control issues with the product or something, I don't know, but at that price, I wouldn't be taking the gamble.
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Old 05-17-2016, 04:44 PM   #6
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Maybe it's just me being lazy, but I like the bags of frozen potatoes already grated for hash browns.
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Old 05-17-2016, 04:51 PM   #7
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Maybe it's just me being lazy, but I like the bags of frozen potatoes already grated for hash browns.

If you're lazy, Kay, guess I am too. I'm a big fan of frozen hash browns and Tator Tots.
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Old 05-17-2016, 05:04 PM   #8
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Even lazier here... I use the dehydrated shreds ;)
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Old 05-17-2016, 05:21 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8 View Post
I used my KitchenAid box grater, using the course side, to make hash browns. It's kind of a pain to clean, so I would like to find a single-sided grater.

I saw this Oxo grater at BBB. Is this course enough for hash browns?
OXO Good Grips® Handheld Coarse Grater - BedBathandBeyond.com
To answer the original question, yes it looks like a good coarseness for hashbrowns.

I personally like to use the grater attachment on my food processor because it's super fast for shredding lots of potatoes (or cheese) and i've shredded my knuckles on the manual ones a few time. If you want fewer surfaces to clean this is probably not the best method. Oddly enough, hashbrowns are one of the areas where I would happily go through the extra steps to make fresh rather than buy the frozen bags.

Dehydrated take too long to reconstitute, and then they still have a weird texture, in my memory at least.
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Old 05-17-2016, 05:30 PM   #10
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To answer the original question, yes it looks like a good coarseness for hashbrowns.

I personally like to use the grater attachment on my food processor because it's super fast for shredding lots of potatoes (or cheese) and i've shredded my knuckles on the manual ones a few time. If you want fewer surfaces to clean this is probably not the best method. Oddly enough, hashbrowns are one of the areas where I would happily go through the extra steps to make fresh rather than buy the frozen bags.

Dehydrated take too long to reconstitute, and then they still have a weird texture, in my memory at least.
Hi LE and welcome to Discuss Cooking.
I would be interested to hear the reason for your view on this. Obviously I disagree, as the frozen product is perfect every time with no effort at all.
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Old 05-17-2016, 06:19 PM   #11
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Maybe it's just me being lazy, but I like the bags of frozen potatoes already grated for hash browns.

That sounds really convenient! I haven't seen organic purple potatoes grated and frozen, but it would be great if I could find them.


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Old 05-17-2016, 06:23 PM   #12
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It looks like that Oxo thing will do the trick. I use a box grater regularly for cheese, potatoes, carrots, etc. A quick rinse usually gets it clean enough to put in the dishwasher.

Awesome! I usually make hash browns with one or two small potatoes at a time, which is why the Oxo grater could be perfect.


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Old 05-17-2016, 06:37 PM   #13
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kg, RP's suggestion to wash/soak immediately is a good one. I do that even though I use a flat grater. When I did use a box grater, I found a long-handled dish brush useful. Personally, I think the holes in the grater you linked to in your first post might be too small - or they look that way because of the position of the slots. I found one with holes similar in size to what I use, and at less than half the price of the BB&B one. Then again, it looks like it could be a dangerous site to browse...
Tablecraft SG206BH Stainless Steel Flat Grater


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...Oddly enough, hashbrowns are one of the areas where I would happily go through the extra steps to make fresh rather than buy the frozen bags...
Kayelle, can I chime in here, too? When another member asked what to do with 100 pounds of potatoes he had to move along, I went hunting for answers. I found an article that said you can use almost-baked potatoes for making hash browns. Like you, I always used the frozen product. However, I had the oven going, knew I had room, and had an chit-load of russet potatoes. (That's what happens when you THINK you need them, buy two bags because they are BOGO, then come home to 7# of potatoes...) and needed to move some along. I tossed four of them into the oven, baked until they were about 75-80% done, and chilled them overnight. I did peel them since the skins were already pulling away from the pulp, grated them, and froze in a single layer on a baking sheet. Poured them into a freezer bag. I've used them a couple of times. They seem to taste a little more potato-y. Also, they're cheap - and so am I.
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Old 05-17-2016, 07:01 PM   #14
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ISO alternative to box grater

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
kg, RP's suggestion to wash/soak immediately is a good one. I do that even though I use a flat grater. When I did use a box grater, I found a long-handled dish brush useful. Personally, I think the holes in the grater you linked to in your first post might be too small - or they look that way because of the position of the slots. I found one with holes similar in size to what I use, and at less than half the price of the BB&B one. Then again, it looks like it could be a dangerous site to browse...

Tablecraft SG206BH Stainless Steel Flat Grater

I think you may be right about the holes being too small on the Oxo. Also they're a different shape. I would love to have that Tablecraft grater. Shipping is pretty pricey on that site however. Maybe I can find it somewhere else.


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Old 05-17-2016, 07:04 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
kg, RP's suggestion to wash/soak immediately is a good one. I do that even though I use a flat grater. When I did use a box grater, I found a long-handled dish brush useful. Personally, I think the holes in the grater you linked to in your first post might be too small - or they look that way because of the position of the slots. I found one with holes similar in size to what I use, and at less than half the price of the BB&B one. Then again, it looks like it could be a dangerous site to browse...
Tablecraft SG206BH Stainless Steel Flat Grater


Welcome to DC, LazyEngineer.


Kayelle, can I chime in here, too? When another member asked what to do with 100 pounds of potatoes he had to move along, I went hunting for answers. I found an article that said you can use almost-baked potatoes for making hash browns. Like you, I always used the frozen product. However, I had the oven going, knew I had room, and had an chit-load of russet potatoes. (That's what happens when you THINK you need them, buy two bags because they are BOGO, then come home to 7# of potatoes...) and needed to move some along. I tossed four of them into the oven, baked until they were about 75-80% done, and chilled them overnight. I did peel them since the skins were already pulling away from the pulp, grated them, and froze in a single layer on a baking sheet. Poured them into a freezer bag. I've used them a couple of times. They seem to taste a little more potato-y. Also, they're cheap - and so am I.
That sounds reasonable CG if you had an abundance of potatoes to use up. Partly baking them and then grating for cooking would also mean that you wouldn't have the problem of raw grated potatoes turning a nasty color before you could fry them up. That's a real turn off for me. On the other hand, if you're working with raw purple potatoes to start with..well...
Glad you chimed in CG!
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Old 05-17-2016, 09:19 PM   #16
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.....I found an article that said you can use almost-baked potatoes for making hash browns. Like you, I always used the frozen product. However, I had the oven going, knew I had room, and had an chit-load of russet potatoes. (That's what happens when you THINK you need them, buy two bags because they are BOGO, then come home to 7# of potatoes...) and needed to move some along. I tossed four of them into the oven, baked until they were about 75-80% done, and chilled them overnight. I did peel them since the skins were already pulling away from the pulp, grated them, and froze in a single layer on a baking sheet. Poured them into a freezer bag. I've used them a couple of times. They seem to taste a little more potato-y. Also, they're cheap - and so am I.
If I'm out of pre-shredded frozen potatoes, that's how I do it, too. You just have to be careful that the baked potatoes are baked enough to be semi-soft, but not so soft that they won't shred in a grater. Sometimes, at least for me, it's been kind of hit or miss. If they're a little too done to shred nicely, they're still good fried up. Kind of like a fried potato pancake. They do freeze nicely as you say, on a baking sheet and then packaged up.

I've NEVER had any luck with shredding potatoes and immediately making hash browns with them. There's still too much starch in them and they've ended up gummy. No bueno.
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Old 05-17-2016, 10:37 PM   #17
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I've NEVER had any luck with shredding potatoes and immediately making hash browns with them. There's still too much starch in them and they've ended up gummy. No bueno.
I agree Cheryl. The last time I grated raw potatoes I read if you soak them in cold water to remove some of the starch, then drain them in a colander, and then rang out the water from them in a dish cloth, they had started turning that weird color and that was the last time I ever messed with them.
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Old 05-17-2016, 11:38 PM   #18
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I agree Cheryl. The last time I grated raw potatoes I read if you soak them in cold water to remove some of the starch, then drain them in a colander, and then rang out the water from them in a dish cloth, they had started turning that weird color and that was the last time I ever messed with them.
Yes, and that is entirely too much work!
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Old 05-18-2016, 05:18 AM   #19
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... i've shredded my knuckles on the manual ones a few time.
You need these

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Old 05-18-2016, 07:46 AM   #20
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You guys do realize that the potatoes will turn back to white once the heat hits them? I usually grate (with the box grater) the potatoes, salt and pepper them liberally, mix in with hands, then let them sit on the board while I start the bacon/sausage, whatevers. When it's time to cook, I pick up a handful, squeeze the liquid out and plop the handful into the saute pan if I want individual hashbrown cakes. If I want just a whole bunch of hashbrowns, I'll just squeeze them all, putting each handful in a bowl until they are all done and then fry. Yes, they've started to turn color but they go back to white while cooking.

Incidentally, I'm a rinse off the box grater as soon as I'm done grating the potatoes too. Same way with the masher for mashed potatoes. No point in letting that stuff dry and make it that much harder to get off. I'm also a wash as you goer too when I have a couple extra minutes here and there.

Interesting about the partially bake, grate and freeze. I'll have to try that next time we have too many potatoes and they are in danger of sprouting.
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