"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cook's Tools
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-24-2009, 08:55 AM   #11
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Wood seems to have worked well for a long time at butcher shops.
__________________

__________________
justplainbill is offline  
Old 04-24-2009, 08:57 AM   #12
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Wood seems to have worked well for a long time at butcher shops.
Yet you will never find wood in any restaurant.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline  
Old 04-24-2009, 09:05 AM   #13
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
I've been in a few New York State restaurant kitchens (admittedly some 20 years ago) that were so equipped.
__________________
justplainbill is offline  
Old 04-24-2009, 09:12 AM   #14
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
I believe (but could be mistaken) that these days it is against health code for restaurants to use wood boards because they can not go in the dishwasher.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline  
Old 04-24-2009, 09:20 AM   #15
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Beautiful Brooklyn NY
Posts: 325
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Plastic cutting boards harbor bacteria in the cuts that develop with use, where it's very difficult to completely get rid of the bacteria: UC-Davis Food Safety Laboratory: Cutting Board Research

Wooden cutting boards actually kill the bacteria by essentially drying them out - the dry interior of the wood absorbs any moisture on the surface and the bacteria can't survive without moisture.

The scientific conclusion:
I am now more confused - see the below link which says the
exact opposit - plastic boards are non porus and will not
harbor bacteria. I use plastic and hard rubber boards exclusively.

Cutting Boards - wood or plastic?
__________________
anything that does not kill me makes me stronger
mike in brooklyn is offline  
Old 04-24-2009, 09:21 AM   #16
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike in brooklyn View Post
I am now more confused - see the below link which says the
exact opposit -
That is exactly why I said that for every study that says wood is better than plastic there is another that says plastic is better than wood.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline  
Old 04-24-2009, 09:49 AM   #17
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,184
Mike, just use and maintain whatever you have in the proper fashion and all will be well.
__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is offline  
Old 04-24-2009, 10:04 AM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,830
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike in brooklyn View Post
I am now more confused - see the below link which says the
exact opposit - plastic boards are non porus and will not
harbor bacteria. I use plastic and hard rubber boards exclusively.

Cutting Boards - wood or plastic?
I don't know if you read the link I sent, but here is a significant paragraph:
Quote:
Our research was first intended to develop means of disinfecting wooden cutting surfaces at home, so that they would be almost as safe as plastics. Our safety concern was that bacteria such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella, which might contaminate a work surface when raw meat was being prepared, ought not remain on the surface to contaminate other foods that might be eaten without further cooking. We soon found that disease bacteria such as these were not recoverable from wooden surfaces in a short time after they were applied, unless very large numbers were used. New plastic surfaces allowed the bacteria to persist, but were easily cleaned and disinfected. However, wooden boards that had been used and had many knife cuts acted almost the same as new wood, whereas plastic surfaces that were knife-scarred were impossible to clean and disinfect manually, especially when food residues such as chicken fat were present. Scanning electron micrographs revealed highly significant damage to plastic surfaces from knife cuts.
The problem is that once a plastic cutting board becomes scarred from use, bacteria get into the scars, away from the surface, and so cannot be disinfected.

From your link:
Quote:
Plastic cutting boards are dishwasher safe. Having said that, most home dishwashers only reach temperatures of between 120-140F. Water must be much hotter than that—about 190F for several seconds to make sure items are properly sanitized.
So putting a plastic cutting board in the dishwasher *does not* sanitize it. In fact, 40*-140* F is the "danger zone," where bacteria multiply rapidly. I have a few plastic boards that have ended up in my kitchen over the years, but I only use them for cheese, bread, fruits and veggies.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now  
Old 04-24-2009, 10:31 AM   #19
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 262
I guess one other thing I don't understand, wouldn't a

plastic cutting board dry and then not provide a friendly environment for bacteria. Where I live the wood in my house swells and contracts depending on the humidity. I would expect the humidity in the air to have the same effect of a wooden cutting board. Just try to open a window in an old house when it is hot and raining and you will see what I am talking about.
__________________
Lizannd is offline  
Old 04-24-2009, 11:10 AM   #20
Head Chef
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Spain
Posts: 1,167
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
Neither is a perfect option, but both are excellent choices is used and maintained properly.
Thanks GB, ever the diplomat, just as I was wondering whether jenniferlee was just winding us up.

As for microwaves being unhealthy, as far as I understand, lots of families now use them to sterilise baby's bottles. If used properly, I can't see why they should be unhealthy.
__________________

__________________
Snoop Puss is offline  
Closed Thread

Tags
cooking tools, kitchen gadget

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.