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Old 08-13-2011, 10:16 AM   #1
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Kitchen scales advice

Hello first post here,glad to be here !!
I have been kicking around the idea of purchasing a digital kitchen scale.The scale I have in mind is the OXO good grips,I have read many good reviews and am confident in this product choice.
The part I'm having trouble is with the model,I have a choice between a 11-pound capacity scale for $50 or a 5 -pound capacity for $30. I mainly want one of thees for weighing flour when making bread and for being able to evenly split my dough halves.I'm sure that I find some other uses along the way but this is my main reason for purchasing one now.
I would like to buy the #5 scale and save a few dollars but don't want to be disappointed in the end ? And spend the other $20 on a cook book or something. I don't think that I'd ever measure over #5,but I had read a review where some said "the #11 is nice for when you use a heavy bowl" This threw me off a bit as I never owned one and was under the imprecision I could set a glass bowl on there and then just tare out the weight of the bowl?And everything would be fine if I never went over #5's of ingredients?
So my question is #11 VS #5,and will I be fine with a #5 as long as my ingredients never surpass #5's? Thx

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Old 08-13-2011, 10:21 AM   #2
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I suggest you get the 5# scale. I bake bread a lot (weekly, and I've never had an occasion for that or any other cooking to need more than 5# on a scale. Anything weighing greater than that already has the weight on the tag or package (chickens, turkeys, roasts, etc.)

Unless you're opening a commercial bakery, 5# is fine.
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Old 08-13-2011, 10:23 AM   #3
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Welcome to the site. You will do just fine with the 5 lb one. Like you said, when you use a bowl you tare anyway so it does not matter how much the bowl weighs.
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Old 08-13-2011, 11:17 AM   #4
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I have the 5# one. I wish I had the bigger one. Usually it is fine, when it isn't, well.. it isn't.
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Old 08-13-2011, 11:24 AM   #5
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is #5 the total capacity including the tare ?
Meaning... If I put a 4 lb bowl on it and then hit tare, would I only be able to put #1 of ingredients in it?
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Old 08-13-2011, 11:28 AM   #6
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I have a 5 kg model (11 lbs) - it displays to the nearest 5 grams - that is, it goes from 230 g to 235 g - I can't "measure" 232 g. which hasn't been an issue in the last hundred years or so for my purposes.

keep in mind, the tare weight of the bowl counts in the "total" - if you're using a 2 lbs glass bowl and want to weigh in 4 lbs of flour, a 5 lb model will go out of range.

folks who are really picky and want to weigh in 3.6 grams of yeast, or seasonings, etc., often have a smaller scale with higher accuracy.

I'd recommend the 5 kg model.
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Old 08-13-2011, 11:28 AM   #7
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No, you will be back up to 5# available.
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Old 08-13-2011, 11:30 AM   #8
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Hmm dcSaute and I gave different advice on the Tare. I am basing my info on a different brand so unless dcSaute knows for sure then you might want to find the owners manual online for the one you are looking at.
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Old 08-13-2011, 11:40 AM   #9
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My scale is the 11-pound size and it's just perfect. I make all our bread products here and also use the scale for almost all of my other everyday cooking. I especially like using it to divide large portions of meats I get on sale. It's just the two of us here, so I do a lot of portioning. Plus, most of my larger bowls are heavy earthenware ones and they weigh quite a bit on their own. My scale, too, includes the weight of the bowl when I calculate weights using the tare feature.
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Old 08-13-2011, 11:48 AM   #10
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Mine came with a plastic tray/bucket for use with dry measures. If anyone needs more than 5#, can you say, "measure twice?"

It's not as if these are the middle ages and you're slapping down a 6# roast or a whole goose in front of each guest!
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