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Old 01-22-2007, 02:29 PM   #11
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It should not be more than a few bucks per knife.
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Old 01-22-2007, 03:10 PM   #12
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well, now that pdswife got decent knives for Christmas, I'm probably the only one left who still uses crummy knives. Guess I'd better start paying attention to threads like this.
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Old 02-20-2007, 10:25 PM   #13
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http://www.cutleryandmore.com/large/166.jpg



This is what most long term profesional chefs use. Norton Tri-stone. It costs more than most any common knive. I think this is a pic of the small version. On the standard size the stones are 11 1/4 inches long and 3 inches wide.

It has three replacable stones of varying coarsness. It will handle any knife and last a lifetime for an individual. As with anything, it takes a bit of time to learn how to properly sharpen a knife. Be carful of sub-standard products. I have never seen a full size Norton tri-stone for under $160. You can buy just the stones for roughly 25 dollars each, and in a home the only one you would really need is Medium.

IMO If you take your knives to a professional to be sharpened, he will probably do a good job. However, if you've paid $100 for a knife, and use it on a daily basis, you are going to see the rough job the professional has done.

Read up and learn to do it yourself. You may ruin a knife, but if you take your knives to a pro on a regular basis to be sharpened. You will ruin a knife.

BTW. use a diamond steel very sparingly.
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Old 02-21-2007, 12:40 PM   #14
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Elcameron,

Why will taking a knife to a professional to sharpen it eventually ruin it?

Thanks,
Paul
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Old 02-21-2007, 01:03 PM   #15
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As a woodworker, I'm constantly sharpening carving tools, chisels, knives etc. For my kitchen knives, I use a Japanese water stone like the one below. I prefer this method for one, because it removes the least amount of steel which will give my knives a longer life. Also, there are sharpening stones that are use water as a lubricant and others that use oil as a lubricant. I have found and read that using the oil the micro shavings from the blade just stick to the knife which in turn would become an abrasive instead of a lubricant.

There is a good tutorial on the Food Network site, and you can find articles on the web regarding sharpening. It is not hard to do as long as you have the patience. I sharpened a 10" chef, 10" slicer, boning & paring knife last weekend, it took me about 30-40 min. total.

(then you can sharpen everyone else's knives)

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Old 02-21-2007, 01:13 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RajunCajun
Elcameron,

Why will taking a knife to a professional to sharpen it eventually ruin it?

Thanks,
Paul
It won't.

Just like anything else, when you give your knives over to a professional to sharpen you are taking a chance. Maybe the person will do an excellent job and really know what they are doing and maybe they won't. Just like when you bring your car to the mechanic or you go to a doctor. You need to find someone you trust.
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Old 02-21-2007, 02:22 PM   #17
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Ah gotcha...I figured I'd missed the point somewhere along the way, and I do agree with it.

Thaks for the clarification.

Paul
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Old 02-21-2007, 04:00 PM   #18
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I sharpen my own blade on an Arkansas stone we keep at work. One of the guys keeps his Japanese water stone there now, and I have to say I reall really like the edge it puts on my blade. There is a little more maintenance to caring for you water stone, but not enough that I think anyone would be put off by it.

If you're uncomfortable learning to sharpen your own knife, you can take it to a pro to have it ground.
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Old 02-21-2007, 09:12 PM   #19
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I have used the chef's choice 130 with great results, although I've never tried it on any of my expensive knives. For them I use whetstones of two different coarsenesses. I do not own the 130, but am thinking about picking one up when I have some extra cash -- very quick sharpener, and a great edge.
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Old 02-21-2007, 10:17 PM   #20
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Two ways that taking your knives to a professional will shorten the lifespan of your knives.

1. A pro uses a grinder to sharpen the knife, removing many times the amount of metal that hand sharpening removes. As the knife gets narrower, the beveled edge becomes a larger angle, the knife does not go through food as easily.

2. A pro will tend to create a dip in the blade near the bolster, especially if you have a German style heavy blade such as Wustoff, Henkles, Hofritz. This dip will be very evident when you are chopping herbs, and greens.

Once you have this dip in your knife, a considerable amount of metal must be removed to get a straight edge back.


As for personal preference: the pro will not put the fine edge on your knife that can be done with a stone. You will be able to see the rough edge from the grinder. You will be able to feel it as the knife goes through a piece of sushi, or raw meat. Some people are ok with that. The pro will make your knife sharp, and it will not take any of your time. However, most "PROFESSIONAL" knife sharpeners are professionals because they bought the machine and for no other reason.
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