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Old 06-11-2006, 05:39 PM   #11
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Hmmmmmmmmmm!

I cannot help wondering what sort of meat you get in America that needs the use of a spiky mallet type tenderizer! I used to need to tenderize Chinese beef (It is terrible quality!) and I have a tenderizer. However, these days plenty of imported beef is available.

On the other hand, I often use the flat side of this "tenderizer" mallet on beef to make Schnitzel, Chicken rolls, or Pork Cordon Bleu. But I have not used the spiky side of the mallet for years.

My suggestion is NOT to tenderize by beating with spikes. It means all the juices run out when cooking.
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Old 06-11-2006, 06:55 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by advoca
Hmmmmmmmmmm!

I cannot help wondering what sort of meat you get in America that needs the use of a spiky mallet type tenderizer! I used to need to tenderize Chinese beef (It is terrible quality!) and I have a tenderizer. However, these days plenty of imported beef is available.

On the other hand, I often use the flat side of this "tenderizer" mallet on beef to make Schnitzel, Chicken rolls, or Pork Cordon Bleu. But I have not used the spiky side of the mallet for years.

My suggestion is NOT to tenderize by beating with spikes. It means all the juices run out when cooking.
In general, the beef that is available to the average consumer in the U.S. in probably the best in the world, with Canada being right up there as well. However, there are some cheaper, tougher cuts of meat that may need tenderizing. But personally, I wouldn't use these types of meats for anything other than braising or stewing anyway. If I'm going to throw some steaks on the grill, it will be rib eyes, porterhouses, or new yorks. If you have to take a tenderizer to any of these cuts, then you should start buying your beef from another store.

Like Andy M. said, poking holes or beating your meat won't necessarily cause the juices to run. Once you add the meat to a hot grill or pan and sear it, the small holes will close up. Juice from the meat may accumulate on the top side, but that will happen even if you don't poke holes in it. So in other words, it's pretty safe to beat your meat as much as you want, just make sure that you wash your hands.
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Old 06-11-2006, 09:34 PM   #13
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No slur on American meat intended. I am sorry if anyone thought this.

But Ironchef is right. If you are buying meat that needs tenderizing then do not tenderize it. Use it in stewing

This really raises the question, why buy a spiky "tenderizer?"
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Old 06-11-2006, 10:42 PM   #14
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My S. O. LOVES! stuffed flank steak. It is a very tough piece of meat but has a great beef flavor. Before stuffing it, I tenderize it with the studded hammer mentioned above. It serves to break up the muscle fibers some and allows me to flatten the flank steak to a larger, thinner piece of meat. Then I stuff, roll, tie, sear and roast to medium rare.

The final step is slicing it across the grain and serving. Handled in this way, it's reasonably tender as well as being very tasty.

I also marinate and grill flank steak after tenderizing it with a jacarding tool. Again, very flavorful beef and tender if sliced across the grain.
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Old 06-12-2006, 11:09 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Andy M.
First, "poking holes in the meat" when it's raw will not cause the juices to run out when it's cooking. This is only true if you cut into cooked or partially cooked meats. So pound away.

Second, some chemical meat tenderizers direct you to poke holes into the meat before applying the tenderizer so it will penetrate.

Either is an effective solution.
Hey Andy,

I suppose you are right, now that I think about it a little more. I have used the chemical tenderizers in the past without poking holes, but it really is only after you start cooking meat that it starts spouting like a geyser if you poke a hole in it. This makes me feel better about pulling the plastic turkey timers out! Thanks,

Kely
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Old 06-12-2006, 11:43 AM   #16
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I have several preparations for round and flank steak. I find that marinating adds even more flavor if I pound with the tenderizer side of my mallet before adding the marinade (creates an effectively larger surface area to take the flavor).

I also have one of the Jaccard types that I bought at Cabela's a few years ago. I use it both for tenderizing and again for giving the marinade a greater effect.

I use the flat side regularly for chicken breast... I generally slice them in half, then pound to about 1/4" or even less. The meat cooks faster and doesn't seem to be as dry as when I cook breast halves whole... and again, it seems to enhance any flavors or sauces I use.
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Old 06-12-2006, 12:47 PM   #17
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I can't tell you what kind I have...it's just one I got from my grandmother. The spikes are not all that long, and it does have a flat side.
I use it to pound out thin slices of boneless pork loin into cutlets, which we season, dip in seasoned flour, then in egg/water, then back in flour. We fry them in hot canola oil, and they are delicious!
Same thing with round steaks...we cut them in individual pieces, and make chicken-fried steaks.
We also use it on chicken breasts to make things like Chicken Lombardi.
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