"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cook's Tools
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-03-2007, 11:46 AM   #11
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
Posts: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Hutchins View Post
.... when I put my bread or pizza on them and I leave it in the oven and if one breakes it does not cost a fortune to replace it go for it.
Pizza dough recipe aside; when you're ready to prepare the pizza for the oven with the pre-heated pizza stone (or whateverelse alternative you might be using), do you actually slide the prepared pizza (w. all of the toppings) with some sort of wide (12" or wider) spatula onto the stone in the oven?

I also understand (from reading other posts at DC) that a porous heated stone will absorb the moisture from the dough, thereby creating a crusty pizza. A thick and chewy pizza crust would be my favorite.

I've been baking focaccia bread in a heavy 12" cast iron frypan with some success.
__________________

__________________
akwx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2007, 12:07 PM   #12
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,405
Quote:
Originally Posted by akwx View Post
...do you actually slide the prepared pizza (w. all of the toppings) with some sort of wide (12" or wider) spatula onto the stone in the oven? ...

I use a wood pizza peel. You can get them for around $10.

I sprinkle a generous portion of cornmeal onto the peel then place the dough on that and build the pizza. When I'm done I give it a little shake to esure it's not stuck to the peel and gently slide it onto the stone.

Depending on how you cook it and how thick your crust is, the stone will yield a crisp but not brittle crust. It will have a good chew to it without being soggy and doughy.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2007, 12:27 PM   #13
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 423
You could go online a find a Pampered Chef consultant in your area. They sell a nice pizza stone that doesn't contain lead. I understand that some of the others out there in the market contain lead which you don't need in your body.
__________________
Green Lady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 02:31 AM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
Posts: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I use a wood pizza peel. You can get them for around $10.

I sprinkle a generous portion of cornmeal onto the peel then place the dough on that and build the pizza. When I'm done I give it a little shake to ensure it's not stuck to the peel and gently slide it onto the stone.

Depending on how you cook it and how thick your crust is, the stone will yield a crisp but not brittle crust. It will have a good chew to it without being soggy and doughy.
I can imagine the wooden pizza peel would be great to build the pizza on, and then to "slide" the uncooked pizza onto the stone; however, when it comes to the "lift" from the oven, I can also imagine a thinner (than wood) aluminum peel being better for the job? Correct me if I'm wrong.

BTW, I'd just found our 3-piece 15" unglazed ceramic pizza stone in the storage room. It'll be pizza night tonight. I just have to shop for a good pizza peel!
__________________
akwx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 06:29 AM   #15
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,405
A thinner tool works better to remove the pizza but is't not as important as the wood peel used to deliver the uncooked pizza to the stone.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2007, 09:14 AM   #16
Senior Cook
 
gourmande's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Windsor, Ontario CANADA
Posts: 185
I don't have a peel, so what I use is a large cookie sheet with an open end (i.e., no lip at one end.) It works like a charm both to slide the pizza onto the stone and to retrieve the cooked pizza from the oven. I prepare the cookie sheet as one would a peel and as Andy M described
Quote:
...I sprinkle a generous portion of cornmeal onto the peel then place the dough on that and build the pizza. When I'm done I give it a little shake to esure it's not stuck to the peel and gently slide it onto the stone...

G
__________________
"Je vis de bonne soupe et non de beau langage." Molière
gourmande is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2007, 09:26 AM   #17
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,405
If you don't have a cookie sheet with no rim, just turn one over and use the bottom.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2007, 06:12 PM   #18
Senior Cook
 
LMJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Kent, Ohio
Posts: 216
I used the unglazed bottom of a kitchen floor tile purchased at Lowes for about $2.

Then again, considering how well my first pizza turned out, that might not be such a good pizza stone...
__________________

__________________
"It's not a bald spot, it's a solar panel for my electric personality."
-Red Green
LMJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.