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Old 11-10-2011, 09:39 AM   #21
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I say down on the glasses. You are putting the glasses on the shelf clean so the shelf shouldnt be too dirty. And if there is kitchen grease on the shelf, then the glasses would get the grease on the rim regardless if it was up or down. I think the positives outweight the negatives when rim down.

I have a pot rack, but it is a few feet away from the stove so it does not collect the grease. If you can I would put it somewhere else in the kitchen.
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Old 11-10-2011, 10:30 AM   #22
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Yep; it's fun to have an antique kitchen. I'm really enjoying the challenge of thinking through what I can do to look retro without compromising modern conveniences.
I think of one of the hallmarks of a "farm" kitchen to be that the fixtures are freestanding. Old farm houses didn't have pre-furnished kitchens. In other words, counters, sink, cabinets, and such are independent pieces of furniture. This is probably least practical in the case of the sink, where massive modern sinks hat emulate heavy old stone sinks are popular. But the look can be made consistent with the rest of the kitchen, even though the sink unit isn't really freestanding, and none of the other fixtures may be either. You can get the idea here:
Delvin Farm Kitchens & Country Antiques - Country Kitchens

The bottom edges of their pieces suggest independent, movable pieces, even though they likely are not. Everything is imminently convenient and modern in function, but the impression is of a large bare room that has been populated with standing tables and cabinets.

Oddly, the notion of freestanding kitchen pieces can also create a "commercial" kitchen appearance, because the principle of piecemeal furnishing a bare kitchen room is the same. The difference is in materials. My own kitchen is populated by a large stainless steel "L" counter with integrated sink, stainless steel glass front cabinets and setback cabinets (former medical furnishings), and stainless rolling table for an additional central work surface. It's very different from the effect that would obtain from Euro-style built-in stainless, in the same way that the above linked examples are different from built-in "country style" cabinetry that is less "farm" and more mid-century imitation "country."
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Old 11-10-2011, 11:02 AM   #23
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Hi,
i looked at the pictures of shelving that you are considering for your kitchen. It looks to me as though the shelves will be covered with doors that are either glass or an opaque material. Will the sides be open? If closed, you shouldn't have any more problems than those of us with wooden cabinets. They get dirty, toI store my classed bottoms down, especially in my glass doored hutch.
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Old 11-10-2011, 11:44 AM   #24
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Hey, Lynda

Thanks for looking! My most current plan is to have a combination of upper, fixed shelving that does indeed have the repurposed window sashes acting like cupboard doors, with glass, and then below that, to have one fixed shelf with an 8" space. There, I may well store wine glasses, drinking glasses, bowls, etc. Plus, over the fridge will be open shelving, I'm thinking, with trays... so there's probably going to be plenty of open shelving, though some will be covered by glass because, frankly, I don't want to spend all my time cleaning my dishes each time I need them. I love the open shelf look, but I'm also a fan of cleanliness through glass cupboard doors. Since I get to use my old window sashes as doors, I feel like I'm getting the best of both worlds, in terms of character vs. convenience. :D

Thanks for answering me!
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Old 11-10-2011, 11:45 AM   #25
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I agree with most of us: the "downs" have it~!
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Old 11-10-2011, 11:48 AM   #26
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I think of one of the hallmarks of a "farm" kitchen to be that the fixtures are freestanding. Old farm houses didn't have pre-furnished kitchens. In other words, counters, sink, cabinets, and such are independent pieces of furniture. This is probably least practical in the case of the sink, where massive modern sinks hat emulate heavy old stone sinks are popular. But the look can be made consistent with the rest of the kitchen, even though the sink unit isn't really freestanding, and none of the other fixtures may be either.
I love this observation. I've been looking at hoosier cabinets. My pantry area is perfect for putting two of them side by side, and that's my current plan. One can buy extra deep cabinets like the ones you just linked to. I'm now thinking that I'll bump out my sink about 3" when I order my SB. Thanks!
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Old 11-10-2011, 12:07 PM   #27
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Oh how I envy you. I lived on a farm as a child and loved the old house. We had a 'Summer Kitchen' where all the canning was done Had a big wood stove. There was a very large blue splatter pan for sterilizing and shelves everywhere for the Mason or Ball jars. Th ceiling in the Summer Kitchen and barn had smoked meat hanging and it smelled so good. You have evoked some happy memories for me. Good luck with your renovations.
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Old 11-10-2011, 12:27 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by MountainMomma View Post
I love this observation. I've been looking at hoosier cabinets.
This is how the different freestanding cabinet ideas converge. Traditional hoosier for the retro farm kitchen - stainless "hoosier" for the modern "commercial."
http://vetprodist.com/images/uploads/CIMG0628.JPG

I use mine for a spice cabinet upper and secondary tools storage below, with a small microwave slipped into one side of the surface between. (Note the locking "drug" cabinet in the lower right behind the glass. Now, they can't get into your personal reserved snacks.)
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Old 11-10-2011, 01:19 PM   #29
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Right; well, if you go to my blog, you'll see that there's a generous pantry area with 85" of wall space where existing cabinets (ugly!) can be torn out. I'm planning to do so, and then put two, freestanding hoosiers there. On any day of the week, it seems that I can pick up two antique hoosier cabinets that are about 42" wide for between $350-$500 in oak and in great shape off of CraigsList. So, we're out of money now, but eventually, that's my plan. Then, when you stand in the kitchen area--or outside of it looking in--you'll see through to the hoosiers. They will be truly freestanding and give that sense of old-world charm, methinks.

One thing that I'm now noodling is whether to have my base cabinets be wood or white painted. Since I've now practically decided to have white painted shelving with glass-fronted, repurposed window sashes as cabinet doors (probably painted white, too, or maybe left in a varnished condition... not sure on that) I'm thinking that a really good clear finish on wood (stained or natural) would last longer than white painted cabinets. Seems like no matter what you do, painted cabinets look ratty with hard use. Thoughts, anyone?
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Old 11-10-2011, 01:34 PM   #30
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Look into Milk Painting for that Old World charm.
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