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Old 11-10-2011, 02:02 PM   #31
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What fun you must be having!!! Several years ago hubby and I re-did our kitchen, with emphasis on stainless steel, maple cabinets and black granite countertops. To your original post, I would agree with the others to store stemware and mugs down. There is a shelf-lining product that bars use to pad their glasses, that is washable and near invisible, Just a thought. Good luck!!
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Old 11-10-2011, 02:23 PM   #32
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One thing that I'm now noodling is whether to have my base cabinets be wood or white painted. Since I've now practically decided to have white painted shelving with glass-fronted, repurposed window sashes as cabinet doors (probably painted white, too, or maybe left in a varnished condition... not sure on that) I'm thinking that a really good clear finish on wood (stained or natural) would last longer than white painted cabinets. Seems like no matter what you do, painted cabinets look ratty with hard use. Thoughts, anyone?
That's my experience. Seems like painted kitchen cabinets end up being worn by frequent cleaning to the point where they look dirty, anyway. However, I'd sure think about Addie's suggestion for milk paint, since it's kind of "preworn" and doesn't show the cleaning wear so much but still lends some color.

Happen to have old blown glass for those sashes?
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Old 11-10-2011, 03:26 PM   #33
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That's my experience. Seems like painted kitchen cabinets end up being worn by frequent cleaning to the point where they look dirty, anyway. However, I'd sure think about Addie's suggestion for milk paint, since it's kind of "preworn" and doesn't show the cleaning wear so much but still lends some color.

Happen to have old blown glass for those sashes?
Yes; I've never seen Milk Paint before: very cool! And I agree about the "pre-worn" look.

Blown glass: probably. They are authentically from the house, and it was turn of the century. We'll have to see, though. They don't LOOK fancy at first glance. Like, no stained glass. Just clear. Still could be old glass, tho. There were about 30 piled up in the house, and then we removed another 32. So, we have plenty to choose from!
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Old 11-10-2011, 04:05 PM   #34
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If they're original glass to the house, they are blown. Glass from that era was industrially blown into enormous cylinders. The cylinders were split while still hot and laid out flat. After annealing, it was cut up into desired sizes. Being blown, there were slight irregularities, wavy areas and sometime "seed." The older the blown glass, the more irregular, because the blowing machinery got more sophisticated as they went along.

Modern glass is "float" glass that is floated molten on a bed of mercury or some similar technique and it therefore near perfect and flat. Older blown glass has character and an authentic look and is particularly nice when the cabinet has large panes. You can easily tell blown glass by holding it up and moving it around while looking through it. Any distortions, and it's blown. If you find some float glass among the sashes you picked out, look through the others. Old houses often have a mixed bag, since some glass was replaced with float over the years.

If it's really old, say 100 years, old window panes may be found to be significantly thicker at the bottom. Glass always has some liquid properties, and it very slowly flows downward. In my old 100+ year old house, the big four-foot square front window was over 1/4-inch thick, and I've seen bigger windows with glass flowed down to 1/2-inch at the bottom and tissue thin at the top. Salvage all old blown glass for rehabing old cabinets and such. "Restoration" glass is expensive. (Like $17+ per square foot for late 19th/ 20th century "light" reproduction and more for 17th/18th century repro.) We always keep a lookout for anyone who is throwing out old windows and check for old glass in them.
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Old 11-10-2011, 04:18 PM   #35
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You can easily tell blown glass by holding it up and moving it around while looking through it. Any distortions, and it's blown. If you find some float glass among the sashes you picked out, look through the others. Old houses often have a mixed bag, since some glass was replaced with float over the years.
Well, I just looked at the one sample sash I brought home (how could I not?) and it's blown glass. Yay! :D Thanks for the tips!
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Old 11-10-2011, 04:21 PM   #36
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Look for inperfections in the glass. Tiny bubbles, lines that look like cracks.
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