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Old 09-25-2011, 05:44 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by joesfolk View Post
it probably will work. Just be sure that the stones are unglazed.

...and that they contain no heavy metals. They have to be food safe.
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Old 11-28-2011, 07:25 AM   #12
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You can buy individual unglazed stoned from an opened box. They are cheaper to buy singular than a whole box. You don't want to cover the whole bottom. It will affect your heating element. Just buy enough for a large size pizza. About 15 inches.
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Old 11-28-2011, 03:24 PM   #13
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I also thought a pizza stone was a pizza stone, and I never had a problem with them cracking until, interestingly, I started using them right.

You really should crank your oven to 450 or more, and then preheat at least an hour so the stone can be roaring hot. This is the kind of surface you need to bake pizza crusts at home so you have a nice, slightly crisp bottom and a perfectly cooked top. Unfortunately, this stress tends to crack cheaper ones. Then again, since they are fairly cheap and are hard to wash, I don't mind buying a new one every so often.

Unless someday my wife lets me drop a few grand on a gas Blodgett or Baker's Pride pizza oven. LOL, fat chance.
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Old 11-29-2011, 07:08 AM   #14
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I've been lucky I guess. I set my oven at 550 for pizza and haven't cracked my cheapo stones yet, but I'm sure that it is just a matter of time, I don't treat them very well...
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Old 11-29-2011, 11:55 AM   #15
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I am in your corner bakechef. If it requires special care, then I don't want it. I don't have the patience to handle with care. I bought it, I paid for it and I want to be able to use it without restrictions. That's why I quit buying non-stick pans. I was given by my son some restaurant aluminum heavy duty skillets . They take all the abuse I give them and my food never sticks. I do keep my equipment clean and covered.
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Old 12-10-2011, 03:35 PM   #16
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Pizza stone

Hi,
My local cookware shop suggests keeping the pizza stone on the bottom of the oven and not putting the actual pizza on it,but baking the pizza on a rack above it. What do you think?
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Old 12-10-2011, 10:09 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Candykitchen View Post
Hi,
My local cookware shop suggests keeping the pizza stone on the bottom of the oven and not putting the actual pizza on it,but baking the pizza on a rack above it. What do you think?
I think your little shop doesn't know what it is talking about. Through use of putting the pizza directly on the stone, your stone is going to become stained, dirty looking, etc. All that is called character. And character is what is going to give your pizza flavor. You don't get flavor from ss racks.
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Old 12-11-2011, 12:18 AM   #18
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The whole purpose of the stone is to create a crisp crust on your pizza, the stone is preheated, and maintains that heat helping cook the pizza quickly and evaporating moisture from the dough rapidly, it would make no sense at all to use a stone in the oven and then not set a pizza directly on it.

The local cookware shop is confused.
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Old 12-11-2011, 10:02 AM   #19
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I got gifted a pizza stone when a friend moved. I had one years ago. Do I have to soak it in water before I use it in the oven? Do I put the rack in the oven and then the pizza stone on top?
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Old 12-12-2011, 08:41 AM   #20
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Wetting a pizza stone is not necessary and will probably reduce its effectiveness. It will not heat to full temperature until all the water has evaporated. Just place the stone on an oven rack, preheat, and cook the pizza right on the surface of the stone. Assembling the pizza on some parchment paper may make the transfer to the stone easier and will not seriously impair bottom browning.

Where the stone is placed in the oven can significantly affect pizza quality. Many techniques call for stone placement low in the oven, but you may have better success with balanced browning by mimicking the low overhead of a professional pizza oven and placing the stone in upper third of the oven. It will significantly improve top browning by making the pizza accessible to reflected radiant heat from the top and walls of the oven..
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