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Old 07-04-2009, 02:18 PM   #21
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My husband bought a few of the silicone ones a few years ago. I had some problems getting used to the lack of flexibility but the extra heat resistance (I've burned myself through many cloth ones) and longevity make up for it once you're used to them. The added bonuses -- they are great for gripping jar lids to open them, they're on hand to use as heat-proof trivets, and they keep a mixing bowl or cutting board solid and in place on the counter, and as mentioned, superb washability -- make it well worth getting used to them. The one exception is that for awhile our local gourmet equipment store had one with a waffle sort of texture, and I hate it (Goodwill, here you come) because it absorbs and retains water. So the ones you normally see (flat and thin with little bubble type protrusions) are better.
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Old 07-04-2009, 02:30 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by dave the baker View Post
I use "Ove-Gloves" (as seen on TV!). They are great as long you don't get them wet; then they transfer heat in a hurry. They are washable, etc., etc. Just don't let the dog get hold of a soiled one! LOL

I second the Ove-Glove, they withstand a lot of heat and you have great dexterity due to it being a fingered glove and not a mitt. When they get old, they come to me for BBQing, I can actually reach down and grab the grate that's been over the flame long enough to sear meat and move it around over the fire without getting even the slightest warm. Of course a high flame may singe the finer "hairs" on them, but they haven't been damaged yet and I've BBQ a LOT with them
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Old 07-04-2009, 03:19 PM   #23
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I was in a "junk" store yesterday and saw a silicone type pot holder for a $1.00. Upon reading the label, I discovered it was safe for temperatures up to 200 F.! That's not gonna be much help taking a pan out of the oven.
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Old 07-04-2009, 04:18 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I was in a "junk" store yesterday and saw a silicone type pot holder for a $1.00. Upon reading the label, I discovered it was safe for temperatures up to 200 F.! That's not gonna be much help taking a pan out of the oven.

Andy - I agree with the 200F "anythings" should have been pitched in the trash, and not sold. I have two silicone mitts, but even if they are awkward to use, they are good to 550F. So if I have good reason to use them (huge roaster stuff like turkeys) I use them. But I use the old pads for lighter duty. I will say that I do use the heck out of the couple of counter silicon pads though. Work great, and never a scorched counter concern.

Bob
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Old 07-04-2009, 04:20 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire View Post
My husband bought a few of the silicone ones a few years ago. I had some problems getting used to the lack of flexibility but the extra heat resistance (I've burned myself through many cloth ones) and longevity make up for it once you're used to them. The added bonuses -- they are great for gripping jar lids to open them, they're on hand to use as heat-proof trivets, and they keep a mixing bowl or cutting board solid and in place on the counter, and as mentioned, superb washability -- make it well worth getting used to them. The one exception is that for awhile our local gourmet equipment store had one with a waffle sort of texture, and I hate it (Goodwill, here you come) because it absorbs and retains water. So the ones you normally see (flat and thin with little bubble type protrusions) are better.

Claire! What a great idea on the jar opening. I would have never thought of that. Next time I have a recalcitrant pickle jar, I will remember your post here and give it a shot.

Thanks,

Bob
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