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Old 09-15-2010, 07:43 PM   #21
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I have an incredible potato masher and would not trade it for the world. Makes the best mashed potatoes ever....




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Old 09-15-2010, 07:57 PM   #22
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I just found this, and I'd buy it but think it's overpriced.

Shop Gourmet Potato Masher/Blender at CHEFS.
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Old 09-15-2010, 11:42 PM   #23
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Golly Alix, I wasn't at all trying to tell you anything about your mashed potatoes. I was just expressing my opinion on the TERM, not the method by which one arrived at their mashed potatoes.

As you so nicely pointed out, mashed is, now, a matter of opinion.. what some call nicely mashed, others might think are a bit lumpy. Rustic potatoes with big ugly chunks sounds pretty nasty to me!

What I failed to express... my bad... was that a ricer doesn't reallY MASH the potatoes, it crushes them between a plate and a sieve. Whereas the old fashioned masher does just that... with a lot of elbow grease, the potatoes are.. for lack of a better term.. MASHED into the desired consistency.
Mashed isn't crushed... that was my poorly expressed point. Sorry if you took offense, I certainly wasn't calling a riced potato inferior to an old fashioned MASHED
potato!!!!!!

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Old 09-15-2010, 11:49 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I don't use a potato masher. I use a ricer instead as it assures me of smooth, fluffy, lump-free potatoes.
I wasn't sure what a "ricer" was
so I googled it and found this...
Dam*. You guys mean business
when you mash your potatoes!
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Old 09-16-2010, 09:51 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GrillingFool View Post
...a ricer doesn't reallY MASH the potatoes, it crushes them between a plate and a sieve. Whereas the old fashioned masher does just that... with a lot of elbow grease, the potatoes are.. for lack of a better term.. MASHED into the desired consistency...
So if a potato is pressed between a hand held tool and the bottom of a pan it's mashed but if it's pressed between the two sides of a different tool, it's not...

I don't understand your insistence on making this distinction. Is it the name 'ricer' that's confusing you?
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Old 09-16-2010, 09:54 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mollyanne View Post
I wasn't sure what a "ricer" was
so I googled it and found this...
Dam*. You guys mean business
when you mash your potatoes!
For THAT kind of ricer you need a really big kitchen. I use this kind.
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Old 09-16-2010, 10:35 AM   #27
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We have mashers like numbers 1 and 5, but both are heavy metal and we've had them for over 40 years. They are both built like battleships, which is probably why they've lasted so long...and tons and tons of potatoes have been mashed using them. We also have a ricer.

As others have mentioned, the desired texture of the potatoes dictates which one is used. Most the time, we like potatoes with a few lumps. Probably a throwback from the days of eating instant potatoes served commercially that were nothing more than glorified wallpaper paste with salt.

The ricer is used when ultra-smoothness is the goal. I also use the ricer to process hard-boiled eggs for egg salad and to squeeze cooked spinach.

As for your questions, I'm a home cook, but have raised 8 children so I guess that, at times, qualified for cafeteria-style cooking, especially since most of the children were boys.

I already explained my motivations for which one I use and, as far as meeting my expectations, I couldn't be happier. They've served me well for more than 40 years.

Each tool is well-made, comfortable and easy to use and I wouldn't change a thing about them.

I can't imagine even considering purchasing a "power" masher since our kitchen is already filled to capacity with powered gadgets. The only power I've ever needed is my two hands and they require no batteries and don't go down during a power failure. Not that there's every been a "mashed potato crisis" in our house during an electrical outage.

Best wishes with your project and let us know how you fare.
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Old 09-16-2010, 01:00 PM   #28
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I do have a ricer, I use it for raspberries when I just want the juice for my dark chocolate ganache for Raspberry Chocolate cake.

I've used the ricer for many things, but most of the time it just gathers dust. Muscle power is the most used item in my kitchen.
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Old 09-16-2010, 01:13 PM   #29
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Andy, if it is that important to you... you are right, I am wrong.
I'll not disagree with you in the future.
You rice, I'll mash and we will both enjoy the final product.
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Old 09-16-2010, 04:24 PM   #30
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For THAT kind of ricer you need a really big kitchen. I use this kind.
That kind I use at home and it's a delight. But industrially... at our brasserie we use something not unlike a cement mixer, which churns out ace fluffy mashed taters at the turn of a knob. Otherwise, with that small one I'd be ricing all night.

On with the ironing prior to vacation. Sure wish I had a mechanical 'ricer' that took the creases outa my linen pants.
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