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Old 10-23-2010, 03:36 PM   #51
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Hi cris we've been happy with masher #1 but thanks to a recently diagnosed trigger finger I'd prefer to grip the 'D' handle of masher #2.

To be clear I want the D handle of #2 on the 'S' style masher of #1.


We've used #1 forever in our at home kitchen. Both our mothers used the almost identical masher. It worked fine for 35 years or so until my trigger finger flared up.

We liked it because it work well, didn't break cleaned easily enough because we usually soaked it and was affordable.

I supposed we pay 5USD's for a decent replacement.
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Old 10-23-2010, 04:07 PM   #52
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I have two - one is like #1, which I don't like, the other is a combination of #2 the business end and the handle like #5. I like the last one better. They are both very old and I don't remember how #1 was acquired - I don't think I purchased it. My mashed potatoes are always fluffy - it may have to do with how much they are mashed. I like them much better than riced or whipped. I also use it to mash avocado for guacamole.
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Old 10-23-2010, 05:19 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chriscamp View Post

Of the five mashers shown, which is most like the one you use? If you use something completely different, please describe it or provide a link that shows yours.
I guess number 5, but the handle attaches to the middle of the base and the holes are wedges. I also use a potato ricer like this:



Quote:
Where do you primarily use it? (In a professional kitchen or at home?)
At home.

Quote:
What motivated you to pick the one that you currently use? Price, feel, appearance, functionality?
I hated #1, because it left too many lumps, so I went to the hardware store and that was the only other style they had. I bought the ricer for other things, but it works well for really lump free mashed potatoes. I only use it occasionally, because it's a nuisance to clean.

Quote:
Were your expectations met?
Yes, I think it works much better than # 1. As to the ricer, I wasn't really expecting to use it for potatoes, so n/a.

Quote:
If not, what would you change or improve?
I would want one something like this:



I used one at a friend's house. It had been her grandmother's. It was the easiest to use masher I have ever used and easiest to clean. I wouldn't mind a more ergonomically designed handle.

Quote:
What about your potato masher do you think is good? What features are the most important to you? (Rigidity, comfort, afford-ability, safe for use on non-stick products, ease of cleaning, etc.)
It makes it easy to have few or no lumps. It's easy to clean (not the ricer). The ricer breaks up the potato peel into small enough bits that my husband doesn't mind them in the "fancy" mashed potatoes. He doesn't mind them anyway in the "everyday" mashed potatoes.

Quote:
Finally, what is the maximum price you would be willing to pay for the best hand powered potato masher you can imagine? Please specify which currency you are thinking of.
$10 to $20, depending on what it is. That's in Canadian dollars.


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Thank you in advance for your time and consideration. I will keep all names and personal information private unless you give me explicit permission. Again, this is just being used for a school report.
I'm female. I don't give my age on the internet.
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Old 11-05-2010, 02:08 PM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chriscamp View Post
Hello,
I am an Industrial Design student at the University of Alberta. I am working on a research oriented design project that requires me to choose an item (a hand held potato masher) and redesign it with the help of communication with the end user. The idea is that by designing it with specific help from the people who use an item most, a better or more suitable tool can be created. What you guys can do to help is simply answer a few questions (which I will post below) and then hopefully engage in a dialog with me as I develop and prototype an improved potato masher.

The following is a sampling of existing potato masher designs.

1
2
3
4
5



Of the five mashers shown, which is most like the one you use? If you use something completely different, please describe it or provide a link that shows yours.

I guess number 5 is closest to the masher I use. It mashes well enough but is a bit of a bugger to clean.

I have seen the first one in the stores, I wouldn't buy it as it doesn't look very effective for mashing.


Where do you primarily use it? (In a professional kitchen or at home?)

At home.


What motivated you to pick the one that you currently use? Price, feel, appearance, functionality?

Price and functionality. Like I said, it mashes well.


Were your expectations met?

For what I was looking for, yes.

If not, what would you change or improve?

Make it easier to clean. Other than that I'm happy enough with it.


What about your potato masher do you think is good? What features are the most important to you? (Rigidity, comfort, afford-ability, safe for use on non-stick products, ease of cleaning, etc.)

Comfort and its effectiveness.


Finally, what is the maximum price you would be willing to pay for the best hand powered potato masher you can imagine? Please specify which currency you are thinking of.

I haven't really thought about it. No more than twenty dollars though. As long as it mashes well I don't feel the need to spend a bundle on it.




Thank you in advance for your time and consideration. I will keep all names and personal information private unless you give me explicit permission. Again, this is just being used for a school report.
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Old 11-05-2010, 04:04 PM   #55
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I haven't been able to find a masher, so I just use a fork. I'd really like to find plastic clad like #5, as my masher, as the pot I cook my potatoes in is teflon.

Using a fork is easy enough, but I have to dirty a bowl to do it, so as to protect my teflon pot.
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Old 11-05-2010, 07:33 PM   #56
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I had a ricer once. Once. The potatoes needed to be just on the verge of overdone to even go through the damn thing. I currently use the #1 and wouldn't trade it for the world. I'll probably get ripped to shreds for not liking the ricer, but it's too much work and too much clean-up:

RSVP Potato Ricer
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Old 11-05-2010, 07:38 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by inchrisin View Post
I had a ricer once. Once. The potatoes needed to be just on the verge of overdone to even go through the damn thing. I currently use the #1 and wouldn't trade it for the world. I'll probably get ripped to shreds for not liking the ricer, but it's too much work and too much clean-up:

RSVP Potato Ricer
I love my ricer, it's old fashioned and looks like a big oval tunnel and I also have a food mill which we will try out on Thanksgiving. I think we all just use what we prefer and let it go at that.
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Old 11-07-2010, 02:00 AM   #58
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Hmm..what about using something like a Meat Grinder for mashing Taters

It'll be like a Ricer on Roids!

edit: Oh , I didn't know there was such a thing .. Food Mill. I thought the Potato Ricers were small hand held things, that had like a 1 cup capacity.

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Old 11-07-2010, 12:41 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshatdot View Post
Hmm..what about using something like a Meat Grinder for mashing Taters

It'll be like a Ricer on Roids!

edit: Oh , I didn't know there was such a thing .. Food Mill. I thought the Potato Ricers were small hand held things, that had like a 1 cup capacity.
Potatoes are very durable, but they can be messed up. If you break the cells, you end up with gluey mashed potatoes, instead of nice and fluffy taters.
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Old 11-19-2010, 12:22 PM   #60
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I just bought a potato ricer, it's actually the same one a few posts up but it came without any directions. It is simple enough to figure out how to use/change blades/clean....but which blade do you normally use for mashed potatoes? It came with two..a medium and then a much smaller holed "coarse". TIA.
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