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Old 01-31-2015, 11:18 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
I kind of agree with this, but then I almost exclusively use a knife for dismembering a chicken. I'll use shears to remove the breastbone for spatchcocking, but I find a good knife to be more effective in cutting through joints.
Yes, you are correct, a knife is a great tool too. 80% of the deboning is done with a knife, buts I am much more efficient with a shear when cutting up a chicken, not sure why...

And I always remove the back bone when I spatchcock a bird, do you have pics of how you do it? I have seen some people do it different, what they call spatchcocking is dissassembling and cutting strips into the breast? I always like to learn new ways, I cut out the backbone {with shears} then flip it and splay it, then the last step is just press down to dislocate everything, normally just one hard pop...
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Old 01-31-2015, 01:39 PM   #32
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Yes, you are correct, a knife is a great tool too. 80% of the deboning is done with a knife, buts I am much more efficient with a shear when cutting up a chicken, not sure why...

And I always remove the back bone when I spatchcock a bird, do you have pics of how you do it? I have seen some people do it different, what they call spatchcocking is dissassembling and cutting strips into the breast? I always like to learn new ways, I cut out the backbone {with shears} then flip it and splay it, then the last step is just press down to dislocate everything, normally just one hard pop...
You're right, I misspoke. It's the backbone that I remove. I'd just gotten off the treadmill and I was lightheaded

Anyway, all it entails is cutting through the ribs, which is pretty easy with a chicken.

When I'd order any sort of meat dish where we lived on Long Island, Bahamas, it almost always came with some sort of bones, because they mostly cut the meat for jerk and curry and stew with a cleaver - no worries about locating the joints. I loved the jerk wild pork and curry mutton (goat) that they served at Max's Conch Bar, but you had to be willing to work through a lot of little bones. It was well worth the effort though.
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Old 01-31-2015, 02:03 PM   #33
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What happened to me was I squeeze them too hard and the shears open up, meaning the gap between the blades spreads and all the force I am squeezing with is transferred in an actual direction vs to cut the bone... Granted I am obviously trying to cut bones larger than the utility tool I have is made to cut.

That pretty much sums it up.

There is tool use and tool abuse.

Use is dangerous but common sense helps mitigate that danger.

Abuse is always dangerous and shows common sense has gone out the window.
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Old 01-31-2015, 02:30 PM   #34
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That pretty much sums it up.

There is tool use and tool abuse.

Use is dangerous but common sense helps mitigate that danger.

Abuse is always dangerous and shows common sense has gone out the window.
wow well thats one way to look at it, very helpful thanks for the post...
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Old 01-31-2015, 03:11 PM   #35
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Thats why it says master chef under your name, lol
Naw.. that's cause I post too much...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooking4to View Post
What happened to me was I squeeze them too hard and the shears open up, meaning the gap between the blades spreads and all the force I am squeezing with is transferred in an actual direction vs to cut the bone... Granted I am obviously trying to cut bones larger than the utility tool I have is made to cut.
Yes, using a tool outside its specifications or using the wrong tool can be dangerous. Using a screw driver as a chisel, for instance, is dangerous (and drives be crazy when I see people doing it). I don't cut things I shouldn't be with the tool I am using. If I had to cut a large solid bone I am not sure what I would do, though I might get a new hacksaw blade or something.
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Old 01-31-2015, 04:41 PM   #36
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Naw.. that's cause I post too much...



Yes, using a tool outside its specifications or using the wrong tool can be dangerous. Using a screw driver as a chisel, for instance, is dangerous (and drives be crazy when I see people doing it). I don't cut things I shouldn't be with the tool I am using. If I had to cut a large solid bone I am not sure what I would do, though I might get a new hacksaw blade or something.
I think the bones I cut are right on the line between needing a saw and a really good shear. I can not picture the ones I just bought opening up, and I am not going to be able to break the handles, so I think they will work. I have a band saw, but it makes a mess with poultry, and I tend to only use it either when I am dressing a deer or buy a large primal beef cut...

Hopefully tthese shears get here soon so i can try them out..
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Old 01-31-2015, 04:44 PM   #37
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Not sure any shears could cut through the leg bones of a 40 lb turkey!
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Old 01-31-2015, 04:54 PM   #38
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wow well thats one way to look at it, very helpful thanks for the post...
I use tools everyday that can remove a digit in an instant.
I also see folks use these same tools in a way that endangers these digits.
I like having 10 fingers but life experiences have shown me that many people aren't that worried about it and take risks due to ignorance or economics. Just the way it is.

Risk is in the eye of the beholder. Tool use is inexpensive yet tool abuse always costs more in the long run.
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Old 01-31-2015, 05:02 PM   #39
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Poultry shears?

I have a dear friend who has managed to remove two said digits a few years apart with a table saw and a band saw. He has a PhD. We do refer to him as the absent minded professor. Another friend recently lost a finger due to an accident with an industrial electric drain snake.
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Old 01-31-2015, 08:45 PM   #40
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I have several kitchen scissors/shears. One was my mom's that come apart for a good cleaning.

I also love these:
Steven Raichlen Meat Shears I use them to split cooked Cornish hens in half and cooked chicken.
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