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Old 02-27-2014, 02:04 PM   #1
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Recommendation for a probe thermometer?

I have the Thermoworks probe thermometer (ThermoWorks Original Oven Thermometer / Timer. Classic design and simplicity at a GREAT price.), which has worked okay for me, but it carries a recommendation to not exceed 392F beyond "short term." So I typically do not use this when roasting something like pork loin/tenderloin or chicken breasts that roast at 425 or 450.

Does anyone have a favorite leave-in meat probe thermometer that can withstand higher temperatures?

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Old 02-27-2014, 02:14 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crankin View Post
I have the Thermoworks probe thermometer (ThermoWorks Original Oven Thermometer / Timer. Classic design and simplicity at a GREAT price.), which has worked okay for me, but it carries a recommendation to not exceed 392F beyond "short term." So I typically do not use this when roasting something like pork loin/tenderloin or chicken breasts that roast at 425 or 450.

Does anyone have a favorite leave-in meat probe thermometer that can withstand higher temperatures?
The temp they refer to is the temp inside the meat, not the oven temp. The sensor that registers the temp is in the tip of the probe which should be in the center of the roast, surrounded by meat that shouldn't exceed145F for pork and 161F for chicken.
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Old 02-27-2014, 05:08 PM   #3
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Thermoworks is a great brand. Professional kitchens use them all the time. You are fine with what you have as Andy said.
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Old 02-27-2014, 05:17 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
The temp they refer to is the temp inside the meat, not the oven temp. The sensor that registers the temp is in the tip of the probe which should be in the center of the roast, surrounded by meat that shouldn't exceed145F for pork and 161F for chicken.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Thermoworks is a great brand. Professional kitchens use them all the time. You are fine with what you have as Andy said.
I'll keep using what I have as long as it works... but I did email Thermoworks and they replied that the cable itself is rated only to 392F.
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Old 02-27-2014, 05:34 PM   #5
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this is a quote from the link in your first message:

/quote
The Original Cooking Thermometer's probe cables will withstand 500F for short term use. The thermometer's probe itself is rated to 392F. The probe cable employs high temperature wires insulated with PTFE and is protected by a stainless steel over-braid. The thermometer probe's cable diameter is small enough to allow it to be closed in an oven door without creating a heat leak. The thermometer probe's assembly is not completely waterproof and should not be immersed in water. The tip of the probe tube can be run under a tap or cleaned with a damp rag. (Keep the thermometer's cable dry.) Keep the probe cable away from heating elements, flames, coals, grill or oven racks - all of which can reach temperatures far higher than 500F.
/unquote

seems to be a bit of confusion somewhere.
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Old 02-27-2014, 06:19 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by dcSaute View Post
this is a quote from the link in your first message:

/quote
The Original Cooking Thermometer's probe cables will withstand 500F for short term use. The thermometer's probe itself is rated to 392F. The probe cable employs high temperature wires insulated with PTFE and is protected by a stainless steel over-braid. The thermometer probe's cable diameter is small enough to allow it to be closed in an oven door without creating a heat leak. The thermometer probe's assembly is not completely waterproof and should not be immersed in water. The tip of the probe tube can be run under a tap or cleaned with a damp rag. (Keep the thermometer's cable dry.) Keep the probe cable away from heating elements, flames, coals, grill or oven racks - all of which can reach temperatures far higher than 500F.
/unquote

seems to be a bit of confusion somewhere.
Indeed. I also asked what 500 for a short time meant. They said less than 15 minutes. So since I use 425 or 450 more often I probably could get a slightly longer time and for most times, that's probably fine.
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Old 12-13-2014, 06:23 PM   #7
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Just a bump to add some up to date info. The Original Probe Thermometer form Thermoworks has been discontinued.

I just got a new ChefAlarm from them, and it appears that this one has replaced the Original. The ChefAlarm a little more expensive, but it is a better tool. It's rated to 572 for the probe, and up to 700 for short periods for the cable. I bought it specifically for grilling, although I'll use it indoors too. I read too often about the Original failing when used in the more hazardous environment of a grill, and the new one is designed for rough use in commercial kitchens. It also has a volume control for the alarm and it is loud enough to be heard three rooms away, or when a lot of people are talking in the kitchen.
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