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Old 10-04-2006, 06:52 PM   #11
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I never wash it...just wipe it well with a cloth towel.
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Old 10-04-2006, 08:07 PM   #12
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I'm with VeraBlue on this ... I don't oil mine, I've never had a reason to wash it, I just flour it well before using and then rub clean with a dish towel when done. If it gets some dough stuck to it - I let it sit an hour or so until the dough dries and it brushes right off.

Never, ever, soak a wood pin in water and what ever you do keep it away from the dishwasher!
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Old 10-04-2006, 11:00 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
I'm with VeraBlue on this ... I don't oil mine, I've never had a reason to wash it, I just flour it well before using and then rub clean with a dish towel when done. If it gets some dough stuck to it - I let it sit an hour or so until the dough dries and it brushes right off.

Never, ever, soak a wood pin in water and what ever you do keep it away from the dishwasher!
Absolutely...no water. Dishwasher...never, never, never. Also, I see no reason to rub with or soak in oil. I've had - still have - several wooden rolling pins for more than 30 years and have done nothing but wipe them down with a clean, damp dishcloth. I've never had a sticking problem when using them. What I believe it amounts to is that they should be dusted with adequate flour as they are being used. My opnion for what it's worth.
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Old 10-05-2006, 10:11 PM   #14
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the bane of rolling pins is soaking in water (which will raise the grain on the wood and if left long enough, can even split it) & washing it too often with soapy water ( which will remove the natural wood oils and dry out the pin).
if you dust your dough properly, nothing should ever stick to the pin. if you have an occasional run-in with a glob of butter or something it's ok to wash it, as long as you don't make a practice of washing it every time. dry it thoroughly and it'll be fine. otherwise, just brush off the flour with your hands or a dry cloth.

the same goes for an old-fashioned sifter. tap off most of the flour by hand and dust off the rest (if you want) with a dry cloth. if you wash these, the flour in the cracks and hard-to-reach places turn into a paste, dry, crack into hard little nuggets which eventually find their way into your cakes and muffins. washing these also leads to rusting. if you do need to wash one, drying it off in a slow oven is best.

as for soaking pins in mineral oil, it's not only unnecessary, but as an amatuer woodworker, i know that too much oil can cause grain and warping problems in wood. with rolling pins, drying out is not a problem if you usually just dust them off. cutting boards, however, get washed frequently and will benefit if you rub in a little mineral oil once a year or so.
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Old 10-06-2006, 03:11 PM   #15
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I wash mine every time I use it. I don't let it soak in the dishwater, and I do make sure it is quite dry before I put it away.

I too have had mine since I was a young slip of a girl--must be months and months now. :)
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Old 10-15-2006, 06:59 PM   #16
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I was surprised to see ppl recommending hot or warm water for cleaning a wooden rolling pin. I was even more surprised to see soapy water recommended.

I agree with others who recommend simply wiping the rolling pin with a dry cloth. If absolutely necessary, use a *very slightly damp* cloth wrung out with *cold* water and immediately thoroughly dry the pin. I also agree with those who say using mineral oil on a rolling pin is unnecessary.

A wooden rolling pin that's routinely used for pastry picks up a small amount of fat from the pastry and, over time, this is absorbed in minute amounts into the wood. You can see this patina if you've been lucky enough to inherit a hardwood rolling pin that's been used by past generations or if you've used the same rolling pin for a long time.

I have 3 good, hardwood rolling pins of varying sizes and designs. All have seen heavy use (by myself and/or their previous owners), none have been washed or oiled and all have that subtle sheen that comes from actual long term use.

I fear that, for many, making pastry at home is a dying art. Those of us who carry on the tradition know that a properly cared for rolling pin is a tool to be cherished.
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