"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cook's Tools
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-19-2006, 04:43 PM   #11
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,393
Quote:
Originally Posted by skilletlicker
...I'll point out that a maximum temperature tolerance of 39xF is pretty low ...

Keep in mind that these temperatures are for the meat in the middle of the roast, not the oven temperature you're cooking then at. I don't want to eat a chicken that's cooked to an internal temperature of 39xF.

The Polder has the same or similar max temp and I find that more than adequate for all my cooking needs. I just can't use it to calibrate my oven across a wide range of settings.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2006, 05:04 PM   #12
Head Chef
 
skilletlicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,069
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Keep in mind that these temperatures are for the meat in the middle of the roast, not the oven temperature you're cooking then at. I don't want to eat a chicken that's cooked to an internal temperature of 39xF.

The Polder has the same or similar max temp and I find that more than adequate for all my cooking needs. I just can't use it to calibrate my oven across a wide range of settings.
Yes sir, I agree completely. My point was that it is not the temperature of the bird thats going to fry the probe or wire but the ambient heat (air temp.)
or oven surfaces. Your bird would have to be pretty well cooked to exceed 390F.
__________________

__________________
Old bachelor cook

skilletlicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2006, 05:18 PM   #13
Head Chef
 
skilletlicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,069
Red face Oops

I'm sorry Andy. I think I was uncharacteristically quick to be agreeable and sacrificed clarity.
Quote:
Keep in mind that these temperatures are for the meat in the middle of the roast, not the oven temperature you're cooking then at.
I think that the maximum temperature referred to is definitely not for the meat in the middle of roast, but the ambient temperature of the oven. Your bird would be pretty well cooked before it got near 39xF. Of course subjecting the probe or wire to an internal oven surface would be even worse.

I'm no scientist but I'm purty sure.
__________________
Old bachelor cook

skilletlicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2006, 05:57 PM   #14
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,393
The temperature sensing portion of the probe is in the first inch or two of the metal point. The wire can withstand the higher temperatures of the air in the oven. When I bought mine, it was sold as a BBQ thermometer for use inside a closed grill. Temperatures inside my closed grill reach up to 550F-600F.

The probe was made with the foreknowledge that the wire would be travelling through the oven where it would be quite a bit hotter than the inside of the meat.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2006, 06:54 PM   #15
Head Chef
 
skilletlicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,069
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
The temperature sensing portion of the probe is in the first inch or two of the metal point.
No argument there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
The wire can withstand the higher temperatures of the air in the oven.
You may be right but I've not seen any documentation to support it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
When I bought mine, it was sold as a BBQ thermometer for use inside a closed grill.
When I bought mine no one made any such claim. Perhaps therein lies the rub. (No pun intended).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Temperatures inside my closed grill reach up to 550F-600F.
That's hotter than three-ninety-something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
The probe was made with the foreknowledge that the wire would be travelling through the oven where it would be quite a bit hotter than the inside of the meat.
I can't say with what knowledge, fore or otherwise, mine was made with.




There is a warning label on the original packaging of Pyrex that says:
DO NOT USE PROBE AND WIRE IN OVEN WITH TEMPERATURE OVER 400F
DO NOT USE IN GRILL


Maybe that warning label is the reason Pyrex can get away with the Lifetime Warranty. I've never tried to return a Pyrex product under warranty so I don't know what value, if any, that holds.



I think you said earlier that you have a Polder. If it was a race, my money would be on your horse. You and another trusted member of this community recommended it. I'm just reporting my experience and passing on some other owners opinions; favorable and otherwise.



__________________
Old bachelor cook

skilletlicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2006, 07:53 PM   #16
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
I'm going to back Andy M. up on this one skilletlicker - there are different kinds of thermometers used, and intended to be used, in different ways.

An oven thermometer is intended to tell you the ambient temperature of the air in the oven. These are generally analog dial/spring or stick/bulb types and either sit on or hang from an oven rack. They are generally inexpensive.

There are instant read thermometers that you stick into the meat to check the temp (these can be analog or digital) but are not intended to be left in the meat and/or oven during cooking. Taylor makes them ranging from about $5 - $15 - and are slower than the Thermapen which costs about $70-$100+ (depending on model and where you buy them).

Meat thermometers are intended to stay in the meat during the cooking process ... and come in 3 flavors - analog dial or bulb, and the new "probe" models where a rigid metal probe with the sensing element in the end of the tip is attached by a wire to a digital readout that remains outside the oven. This is like the old dial and bulb type meat thermometers - the sensing portion is in the tip of the probe so what you are reading is the temp at the tip of the probe - not the ambient air in the oven. These are not intended to be "instant" or "rapid" read.

There are also fry/candy thermometers that generally go a little higher than meat thermometers - but are longer and also have a way to clip them to the pot, something that meat thermometers don't have.

I have a Taylor bulb-type oven thermometer, a Taylor bulb-type candy/fry thermometer, both analog and digital instant reads made by Taylor, and a probe model made by Taylor which is almost identical to the comperable Polder which I picked up at Target for about $16 (they still offer it but it is now labeled as TruTemp - only the colors of the buttons are different).

Dial thermometers depend on a spring made of flat wire that will expand as it heats up, which turns the dial - something like a thermostat works to control your heater/AC. Bulb thermometers depend on the liquid expanding as heated and is moved up the column. Digital uses a method "something" like the dial but is more accurate since they measure changes in electrical conductivity instead of just spring swelling/shrinking.

EDIT: Seems we were typing at the same time ...

I will agree that the "max temp" of the cord on the probe does vary somewhat between brands/models. While the ones intended for indoor oven use are ginerally in the 350F-400F range ... the more expensive "BBQ" rated models appear to go up to 450F-500F ... but they are more expensive and above the temps I would want to use for good BBQ.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2006, 07:58 PM   #17
Head Chef
 
Angie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Iowa!!!
Posts: 1,113
The candy bulb style one was my favorite. I'm all for a quick read. My meat one that stays in the whole time is junk. I don't feel as if it's accurate so I have been seriously turned off by them. Give me instant read ANY day!
__________________
Angie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2006, 08:03 PM   #18
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,048
Actually the spring types use a 2 layer a bi-metallic coil, and it is the different expansion coefficient factors of the two metals in the strip that cause the expansion/contraction of the coil as it heats and cools, moving the needle in the process.

I use a Thermapen instant read... costly but accurate and easy to use. Granted that you actually have to be paying attention to what you're doing, but that isn't an issue for me.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2006, 08:12 PM   #19
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Boston area
Posts: 2,488
Soooo, back to Angie's question:

Polder probe thermometers are great, but about $25. I have several. Love 'em.

Taylor probe thermometers are also good, and I've had one for three years, just bought another at Sears for $17. Love 'em.

Thermpen instant-read digital thermometers are fantastic. But will run you at least $80. I wouldn't live without mine.

Lee
__________________
QSis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2006, 08:32 PM   #20
Head Chef
 
skilletlicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,069
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
I'm going to back Andy M. up on this one skilletlicker - there are different kinds of thermometers used, and intended to be used, in different ways.

An oven thermometer is intended to tell you the ambient temperature of the air in the oven. These are generally analog dial/spring or stick/bulb types and either sit on or hang from an oven rack. They are generally inexpensive.

There are instant read thermometers that you stick into the meat to check the temp (these can be analog or digital) but are not intended to be left in the meat and/or oven during cooking. Taylor makes them ranging from about $5 - $15 - and are slower than the Thermapen which costs about $70-$100+ (depending on model and where you buy them).

Meat thermometers are intended to stay in the meat during the cooking process ... and come in 3 flavors - analog dial or bulb, and the new "probe" models where a rigid metal probe with the sensing element in the end of the tip is attached by a wire to a digital readout that remains outside the oven. This is like the old dial and bulb type meat thermometers - the sensing portion is in the tip of the probe so what you are reading is the temp at the tip of the probe - not the ambient air in the oven. These are not intended to be "instant" or "rapid" read.

There are also fry/candy thermometers that generally go a little higher than meat thermometers - but are longer and also have a way to clip them to the pot, something that meat thermometers don't have.

I have a Taylor bulb-type oven thermometer, a Taylor bulb-type candy/fry thermometer, both analog and digital instant reads made by Taylor, and a probe model made by Taylor which is almost identical to the comperable Polder which I picked up at Target for about $16 (they still offer it but it is now labeled as TruTemp - only the colors of the buttons are different).

Dial thermometers depend on a spring made of flat wire that will expand as it heats up, which turns the dial - something like a thermostat works to control your heater/AC. Bulb thermometers depend on the liquid expanding as heated and is moved up the column. Digital uses a method "something" like the dial but is more accurate since they measure changes in electrical conductivity instead of just spring swelling/shrinking.
Jeez, I don't understand the relevance of any of the above to any disagreement betwwen Andy M. and me. If there is a disagreement I would sumarize it as at what temperature does the probe (particularly the portion not inserted into the meat) or the wire leading out of the oven cease to function reliably. I have no opinion on the Polder as I have no documentation on it or experience with it. As for the Pyrex; I'll take the manufacturers statement not to use probe or wire with temperatures over 400F.

I'll reserve comments on candy, instant read, oven and other types of thermometers for conversations to which they pertain.
__________________

__________________
Old bachelor cook

skilletlicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.