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Old 03-14-2008, 08:30 PM   #11
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If you're going to use a knife to slice really thin slices of tomato, forget about just a "sharp knife" - use a good sharp serrated bread knife. I've been using one for years to slice my tomatoes, & - if the tomatoes are firm enough - I can get them literally paper-see-thru thin if need be. If they're ripe-from-the-garden, I can still get them reasonably thin to make out-of-this-world BLT's.
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Old 03-14-2008, 08:39 PM   #12
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Why forget about a sharp knife? If your knife is properly sharp then it should be able to slice through a tomato and get a thinner cut then you could ever get with a serrated knife. And will a very sharp knife if does not matter if the tomato is firm enough. A very sharp knife will go through a soft tomato like going through warm butter.
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Old 03-14-2008, 08:56 PM   #13
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I use my mandoline regularly, but not for tomatoes. My slicing knife is great on them.
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Old 03-14-2008, 09:01 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
No please do not put your tomato in the fridge. It will destroy some of the flavor compounds that make tomatoes so tasty.
Absolutely right!
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Old 03-14-2008, 09:14 PM   #15
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GB - I guess it's just a personal thing. I've just found, over the years, that my uber-sharp serrated bread knives do a better paper-thin tomato slice than my sharpest chefs knives (& I do keep mine razor sharp). I don't know why this works best for me, but it does.

Again, just personal experience.
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Old 03-14-2008, 09:16 PM   #16
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Well that is fine breezy. I just do not think it is fair to tell the OP to forget about using a sharp knife just because it is not your personal choice.

I am happy the serrated knife works for you.
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Old 03-14-2008, 09:42 PM   #17
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I use a serrated knife...I think it works great. Of course, it's very sharp.
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Old 03-15-2008, 01:29 AM   #18
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Uber ripe? Buck up for a good, sharp knife. The thinner the better (less drag). Or...a saw knife.
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Old 03-15-2008, 08:05 AM   #19
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Thanks GB for teaching me that. Love this forum because I learn so much.
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Old 03-19-2008, 06:03 PM   #20
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BreezyCooking et all,

These are my Engineering two cents, I may be completely wrong, but since posting is free (at least for now)....feel free to use this comment as food for thought.

Serrated knives cut rather well objects which outside skin/epicarp/shell is harder to cut than the inside, some examples of these objects: bread, tomatoes and kiwis.
The serrated the blade is designed in such way that uses less normal shear force than a straight blade knife when cutting therefore affecting less the endocarp/inside/etc. of the object and producing a more clean cut.
Of course, more force is required to cut the same object with a serrated knife... we, humans, offset this by instinctively pushing down and also moving the knife back and forth while cutting.

When using a very sharp straight knife for this task, once we cut pass the skin we "adjust" (lower) the pressure on the knife. In the case of the mandoline (a straight cutter), this is almost impossible to achieve.

For tomato or kiwis, a "V" slice, with an angled cutter should work just fine, perhaps the manufacturer sells a device to adapt the mandoline for this.

I own a Bron mandoline, when I need to slice a lot of tomatoes I run them by hand -no Guard- at about 45 degrees angle to the blade very carefully. I DON'T RECOMMENDED DOING THIS UNLESS YOU ARE VERY EXPERIENCE WITH A MANDOLINE.
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