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Old 02-07-2005, 10:37 AM   #1
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Uses for a teaspoon

A teaspoon - not the measuring kind but the kind you eat with - is perfect for coring apples or pears.

Just halve the fruit, then rotate the teaspoon in a full circle around the core. The core pops out in a half-moon leaving a perfectly circular, tidy hole.

I used to use a knife but this is faster and the fruit looks prettier.

I bet a lot of you knew this already but it was a new one to me so I thought I'd share it :D

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Old 02-07-2005, 11:34 AM   #2
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I could be truly evil on this one, due to the horrific villains I've put in some of my novels. But I'll be a good boy and leave that genre alone. The teaspoon is also fairly close to the measuring variety and in a pinch can be substituted as such. It's also great for scooping out a halved grapruit, mashing stubborn bits of unmelted or undisolved particles in a glass of hot cocoa. The teaspoon is great for taste-testing things, and for sirring up a quick cornstarch slurry, and is the preffered spoon for eating broths, soups, etc.

Don't, I mean DON't use it to push food into a food processor, or meat grinder. It's jsut a very bad idea. Take it from someone who knows.

Also, the teaspoon is the ideal implement for taste testing combinations such as peanut butter and anything. You put a bit of PB or the spoon tip, and fill the rest with the other ingrediant. That way, you get both flavors in your mouth, withour too much of either.

I know, these all seem too obvious. But then again, it's obvious that you shouldn't use a lit match to illuminate the inside of a gas tank to check the gas level, and yet, I've seen people do it on snowmobiles (back before theyput gass gauges on the machines, and yes, I'm old enough to remember 1960 vintage machines).

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 02-08-2005, 10:53 AM   #3
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Well, I usually use a melon-baller to remove the cores of apples and pears, but since I don't normally have one at home, I'll have to give the teaspoon trick a try.

Also, a large service spoon is great to scoop the flesh from a halved and seeded avocado.
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Old 02-08-2005, 11:01 AM   #4
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it is the alto in the musical spoons family. a table spoon being the tenor, and gravy serving spoons are the base. hmmm, i guess a sugar spoon is the soprano.
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Old 02-10-2005, 02:20 AM   #5
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I like to use a teaspoon to peel hard boiles eggs. Crack the shell all over, wet the spoon and insert it under the film on the inside of the shell. Roll the egg around the spoon. BINGO!

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Old 02-10-2005, 03:08 PM   #6
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A teaspoon is the perfect too to use when peeling ginger root. The skin just scrapes right off and you lose almost no ginger.
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Old 02-10-2005, 03:12 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
A teaspoon is the perfect too to use when peeling ginger root. The skin just scrapes right off and you lose almost no ginger.
What a great tip, GB--I can't wait to try it now! I always seem to take half of the ginger with the peel!
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Old 02-13-2005, 03:56 PM   #8
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You can also use it to stir your tea.

Allways assuming you know how to make tea.
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Old 02-16-2005, 03:30 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
I could be truly evil on this one, due to the horrific villains I've put in some of my novels. But I'll be a good boy and leave that genre alone. The teaspoon is also fairly close to the measuring variety and in a pinch can be substituted as such. It's also great for scooping out a halved grapruit, mashing stubborn bits of unmelted or undisolved particles in a glass of hot cocoa. The teaspoon is great for taste-testing things, and for sirring up a quick cornstarch slurry, and is the preffered spoon for eating broths, soups, etc.

Don't, I mean DON't use it to push food into a food processor, or meat grinder. It's jsut a very bad idea. Take it from someone who knows.

Also, the teaspoon is the ideal implement for taste testing combinations such as peanut butter and anything. You put a bit of PB or the spoon tip, and fill the rest with the other ingrediant. That way, you get both flavors in your mouth, withour too much of either.

I know, these all seem too obvious. But then again, it's obvious that you shouldn't use a lit match to illuminate the inside of a gas tank to check the gas level, and yet, I've seen people do it on snowmobiles (back before theyput gass gauges on the machines, and yes, I'm old enough to remember 1960 vintage machines).

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
Goodweed,
Please tell me you're kidding about the last part :roll:
John.
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Old 02-17-2005, 01:22 AM   #10
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A teaspoon is good for rapping a child on the knuckles, or on top of their head, when they misbehave at the table.

I prefer a large wooden spoon for when they act up elsewhere such as in the kitchen. The wooden spoon is also very handy for "applied psychology" to their hiney when warranted ....
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