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Old 10-06-2017, 11:01 PM   #11
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Just remember that most stainless steel pots & pans will not work on an induction burner. I know my tri-plies do not.
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Old 10-06-2017, 11:14 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
Just remember that most stainless steel pots & pans will not work on an induction burner. I know my tri-plies do not.
If you're shopping for pots and pans for an induction cooktop, take a magnet with you. If a magnet doesn't stick to the bottom of the pan, don't buy it.

I have several pieces of All-Clad stainless try-ply and they will work on induction.
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Old 10-07-2017, 01:12 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Stock Pot View Post
I also have some enameled cast iron. Tramontina, not Le Crueset, but still very nice cookware. A Dutch Oven. And I put that in the dishwasher, too, and it always comes out clean as a whistle.

Price-wise I think Le Crueset and All-Clad Copper are in the same ballpark. Performance-wise I think cast iron holds heat better and All Clad responds to temperature changes faster.

That leaves durability. I think stainless wins there. Also srcubability. You can use steel wool on stainless if you have to. Not so cast iron or enameled cast iron.
That makes sense. It looks like a thermal mass vs conductivity thing.

Thanks.

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Old 10-07-2017, 01:15 AM   #14
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Just remember that most stainless steel pots & pans will not work on an induction burner. I know my tri-plies do not.
Stainless steel is fine with induction cooking. Aluminum pots and pans are not. My all-clad try-ply is compatible with induction cooktops. The aluminum layer is not in contact with the cooktop.

Andy is right about the magnet test. But, most cookware packaging will tell you if it is induction compatible.

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Old 10-07-2017, 07:14 AM   #15
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Stainless steel is fine with induction cooking.
Ain't necessarily so. Food grade stainless is typically 300 series stainless, which is not magnetic so it won't work on induction cooktops. 400 series stainless, however, is magnetic. I read somewhere (can't remember where) that most All Clad pans have an inner layer of 300 series stainless and an outer layer of 400 series stainless. If you put a magnet to an All Clad pan it is more strongly attracted to the outer surface than the inner surface.

All Clad has a "factory seconds" sale at significant discounts every couple of months through homeandcooksales.com. You can get on their mailing list through All Clad.
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Old 10-07-2017, 10:40 AM   #16
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All my SS pots and pans are tri-ply. Several are All-clad but I also have several other brands that work quite well. My budget never allowed for all All-Clad.
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Old 10-07-2017, 11:51 AM   #17
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All my SS pots and pans are tri-ply. Several are All-clad but I also have several other brands that work quite well. My budget never allowed for all All-Clad.
I've picked up a few All Clad pans during their "factory seconds" sales, and the prices were roughly equivalent to other tri-ply cookware on Amazon.
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Old 10-07-2017, 11:58 AM   #18
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I bought most of what I have about 16-18 years ago. I haven't added much since then. One of my best purchases was a 12-13 piece tri-ply SS set from Costco for $150. It has a fairly thick aluminum core and works great. My last purchase was a 4-qt. Staub DO on sale.
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Old 10-07-2017, 12:48 PM   #19
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Huh?

I don't think anyone is arguing. Not knowing anything about five-ply, I was curious about how five-ply and cast iron compare as dutch ovens. Just trying to learn something new.

Le Crueset and Staub cast-iron are ceramic coated, so acid is not an issue. They are also dishwasher safe. However, they are heavy, for sure. I have no idea how they compare on price.

BTW, I prefer Audi to Mercedes Benz.

CD
My feeling about cast iron is that it maintains a steadier cooking temperature as the oven temp fluctuates over about a 50 degree range. In my uninformed opinion, that's better for braising or roasting in the oven, and with enameled cast iron, the acid issue is moot.

Where clad cookware stands out is on the stovetop where a smaller central heat source is efficiently transferred to the edges of the pan.
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Old 10-07-2017, 01:41 PM   #20
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My feeling about cast iron is that it maintains a steadier cooking temperature as the oven temp fluctuates over about a 50 degree range. In my uninformed opinion, that's better for braising or roasting in the oven, and with enameled cast iron, the acid issue is moot.

Where clad cookware stands out is on the stovetop where a smaller central heat source is efficiently transferred to the edges of the pan.
That seems to make sense for roasting, and here's a couple of articles supporting that. However, I'm wondering what actual impact this has for braising in the oven, as the braising liquid provides the temperature regulating function. Remember, the braising liquid can't get above 212 F for us at sea level, lower than that for you Rocky Mountain high guys.

The Truth About Cast Iron Pans: 7 Myths That Need To Go Away | Serious Eats

Heavy Metal: the Science of Cast Iron Cooking
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