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Old 11-17-2011, 07:26 PM   #1
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Amoretti Brothers handcrafted copper cookware

Hi,

Hi, I am wondering if anyone has tried Amoretti Brothers copper cookware. I saw those pans at Dean & Deluca, I know they are handcrafted and they look gorgeous but I wonder if you had any review/suggestion to share. Do you think handcrafted cookware are better than the standard machine-made ones? I would like to buy a set for my kitchen. Thanks

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Old 11-18-2011, 12:03 AM   #2
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you want simple design, thick pans. the more design like the fancy ware they show is more difficult to clean. Tin lined cookware is very nice if you know how to handle it. Many folks don't want to bother. Is this pan better than Mauviel or Falk? Probaly not. Is it prettier? Some would think so.
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Old 11-18-2011, 08:57 AM   #3
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Welcome to DC.

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Old 11-18-2011, 10:49 AM   #4
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I'll make these observations. So far as thickness, Amoretti claims 2.5mm. Mauviel claims 2mm and 2.5mm for iron and stainless steel handles and, in this size pan I think, 2mm for the bronze handle model. Pretty close to even there.

I take "handmade" to mean hand beaten. Copper has a peculiar quality that it hardens as it is beaten and, as it's worked, eventually gets too brittle and has to be reheated in order to work it further. There's experience and skill involved. I do not know the details of Mauviel's manufacturing methods, but I would presume them to be more consistent than Mexican hand work.

Amoretti is tinned interior. It will eventually need to be sent off to be retinned, and some degree of care is needed to avoid hastening that day. Mauviel is stainless steel lined, which means almost totally nonreactive and no retinning. (Yes, all my copper happens to be tinned, but I don't find Mauviel at the flea market.)

The prices are both in the $300 range. Amoretti, a 3-quart pan, is $312. Mauviel's 3.2-quart saute pan of similar diameter is MSRP $392. That's no difference at all over the lives of the pans.

The "graving" on the Amoretti embosses through to the interior, as I would expect for what I imagine is really stamping. Whether this will have any effects during cooking I can't say.

The options for other than bronze handles on the Mauviel is attractive, since one option is stainless steel, which should not get so blazing hot as bronze tacked onto a copper pan. And cast iron handles might be something of an improvement, while retaining some traditional look.

For my money, I'd spend it on the Mauviel. The engraving is pretty, but copper cookware is so danged visually impressive anyway, and the plain exterior should be easier to polish. I have a suspicion I'd be messing around a lot trying to get caked Barkeeper's Friend powder out of the engravings.
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Old 11-18-2011, 11:17 AM   #5
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Thanks. someone told me that having tin lining is much better because tin doesn't block the heat spread and, after a decade of use, if you scratch the tin, you can re-tin the surface. With stainless steel the heat spread less quickly and, if the surface got scratched, i have to throw the cookware away (what a waste). It is true? I saw also that tin looks much better than stainless steel on copper (the color, I mean). So? Besides, I didn't look at the hand-graved cookware but at the standard cookware by Amoretti Brothers and it really looks hand-beaten while Mauviel just look machine made. It is true?
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Old 11-18-2011, 12:59 PM   #6
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Oh, I'm sure Mauviel is machine assisted, at least. I don't know how they go about it, maybe hot-formed. I don't buy any argument that there's all that much heat distribution difference between such thin coats of tin, nickle, and stainless steel. Any of them probably have some small effect when compared to unlined copper. Could be tested, though, I suppose. I don't think much about scratching either steel or tin, because I'm very careful to maintain as pristine a surface as possible and never use metal tools in metal cookware. So, I don't put rapid wear on either.

Performancewise, there just won't be any real difference between beaten and formed copper of the same thickness. There is one performance issue, though. Tin melts at 450F. Want to keep that in mind with high heat techniques. But one thing might matter to some. A handbeaten piece will not readily show small exterior scratches and minor dings that would be more obvious on a smooth piece.

The choice, as usual when it's between two similar pieces, pretty much comes down to what you like. I like the look of factory copper, so I'd buy the Mauviel or something like it.
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Old 11-18-2011, 01:16 PM   #7
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Thanks for the in-depth explanation! Regarding heat distribution, what i knew is that stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and can affect the capacity of copper of being the best heat conductor while tin should be a better choice. Anyway, regardless of tin or no-tin lining, I felt in love with Amoretti Brothers cookware for the beautiful look and, as all the greatest loves, I will probably buy it. I will surely post my review after my first use of my first copper pans, to share opinions and ideas.
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Old 11-18-2011, 04:18 PM   #8
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the stainless lining is very thin on the mauviel and falk pots. The difference will not be noticed. Tin can scratch easily, stainless cannot. I think that is a non issue. The stanless costs more up front. I have both. You really can't sear in tin lined.
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