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Old 08-29-2016, 11:57 AM   #11
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I'm not sure if you can actually weld copper as you can do with steel and iron. Copper is generally soldered together.
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Old 08-29-2016, 12:49 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
I'm not sure if you can actually weld copper as you can do with steel and iron. Copper is generally soldered together.
Whether you call it welding or soldering, any metal fabrication place (welding shop) can fix it for her.
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Old 08-29-2016, 02:38 PM   #13
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I would check with the folks at Revere to see if the pots are covered under a lifetime warranty, repair or replacement policy, etc...

If that fails I would toss it or put a plant in it.

It's not worth a trip to the emergency room if the repaired handle comes off when the pot is full of boiling soup. I would also be very concerned about the rest of the pots in the set.

Good luck!
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Old 08-29-2016, 02:52 PM   #14
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Whether you call it welding or soldering, any metal fabrication place (welding shop) can fix it for her.
Well, not any metal shop. Most average weld shops do not have the equipment to deal with copper and other alloys.
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Old 08-30-2016, 02:10 AM   #15
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Whether you call it welding or soldering, any metal fabrication place (welding shop) can fix it for her.
Welding and soldering are very different processes. And then there is braising using brass rod, often used in repairing cast iron.
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Old 08-30-2016, 04:38 AM   #16
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Well, hey, I think putting a plant in it is probably the best suggestion. I am still cooking with it, but it's not that large of a pot and using a mitt to pick it up...well, let's just say I'm getting tired of dipping the mitt into the soup.

I did contact someone on eBay who sells a lot of these and she tells me the handles actually are riveted, just not inside the pot itself. She thinks if it's welded, it may not be as strong as before.

Steve, I wish I could find one for only $8. I'm a little limited in going to thrift shops, though, because I have such a hard time walking and standing. And the people that own thrift shops seem to have such an unreasonable attitude about people sitting on their antique chairs. Can't imagine why.

I think I'll check into maybe getting it welded, but I still think that this December I'll also look into getting the Kirkland set I've wanted. For the price, it isn't that bad and I will use every pot and pan that comes with the set. OK, I may not use the vegetable steamer.

I was going to sell the copper set to help finance the new set. Maybe I will just sell what I have and then keep this pot as a plant holder. If I get the handle welded back on (if that's a cheap thing to do), again, I might just keep the set as decoration. And maybe in my old age, I can sell it for scrap metal to keep me from being destitute.

It's not that I don't like the copper, but I really would like to go back to stay-cool handles, I'm getting tired of polishing these all the time, and the handles aren't all that comfortable - they're really short. On top of all that, I really wanted a large covered saute pan and some extra fry pans, and I don't have that with this set. What I have is a large round pan and an oval pan that really don't fit well on my burners.

A lot of what I might do depends on what happens between now and December and how many bills I have to pay. I have to buy a modem, get glasses, and pay my car registration before then, so that takes care of September, October, and November. Whether I can swing a new set of cookware in December is up in the air.

Thank you, everyone. I really appreciate your suggestions.
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Old 08-30-2016, 07:01 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
Welding and soldering are very different processes. And then there is braising using brass rod, often used in repairing cast iron.
I realize that this is a cooking forum, but I think you mean brazing

Here's a quick explanation of the different metal joining processes...

What's the Difference Between Soldering, Brazing, and Welding? | Fasteners content from Machine Design
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Old 08-30-2016, 10:31 AM   #18
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I realize that this is a cooking forum, but I think you mean brazing
I knew it didn't look right, but it was late and I was too tired to look it up.
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Old 08-30-2016, 12:22 PM   #19
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I did contact someone on eBay who sells a lot of these and she tells me the handles actually are riveted, just not inside the pot itself. She thinks if it's welded, it may not be as strong as before.
They look like rivets. That's why I suggest drilling through (they'll drill through like butter) and inserting tiny carriage bolts. If you have the drill and the right size bit this should not cost you more than $3 to repair.
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Old 08-30-2016, 04:43 PM   #20
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They look like rivets. That's why I suggest drilling through (they'll drill through like butter) and inserting tiny carriage bolts. If you have the drill and the right size bit this should not cost you more than $3 to repair.
Be sure to use stainless steel bolts so they don't rust.
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