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Old 08-30-2016, 04:50 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
Be sure to use stainless steel bolts so they don't rust.
Yes, I mentioned that in my earlier post here. SS bolts and cap nuts.
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Old 08-31-2016, 07:29 AM   #22
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I have the handles go of a pot, that fell on the floor with hot soup in it... but it fell straight down so I didnt get hurt.

Drilling, well the nuts and bolts has to be food safe, yes no nickel or other harmful material and same goes for welding, so ask professional or get a new one.
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Old 08-31-2016, 09:24 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by CakePoet View Post
I have the handles go of a pot, that fell on the floor with hot soup in it... but it fell straight down so I didnt get hurt.

Drilling, well the nuts and bolts has to be food safe, yes no nickel or other harmful material and same goes for welding, so ask professional or get a new one.
I think in this case, the nuts and bolts would be on the outside of the pot, so they wouldn't come in contact with food. But the recommendation is to use stainless steel, to prevent rusting.
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Old 08-31-2016, 09:27 AM   #24
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The rivets securing my wok handle were weakening and getting loose so I replaced them with SS nuts and bolts with lock washers. Works great.
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Old 08-31-2016, 10:31 AM   #25
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Welding will set you back you about $$60-120 bucks. Depending on welder, those are hourly rates and they usually have an hour minimum. Problem with drilling holes is water might seep thru. I'd still give it a try. It will cost you couple of dollars if that.
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Old 08-31-2016, 12:02 PM   #26
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If you can find brass carriage bolts and cap nuts they'll at least blend in with the copper pot.

Here's a brass cap nut
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Old 09-01-2016, 11:17 AM   #27
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Use one of this screw with flat head on the inside:
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Old 09-01-2016, 01:40 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
If you can find brass carriage bolts and cap nuts they'll at least blend in with the copper pot.

Here's a brass cap nut
All the carriage bolts I've ever seen have square "shoulders" designed to fit into a broached, square opening. Are you suggesting a forced fit or filing the hole to accept the carriage bolt?
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Old 09-01-2016, 01:52 PM   #29
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All the carriage bolts I've ever seen have square "shoulders" designed to fit into a broached, square opening. Are you suggesting a forced fit or filing the hole to accept the carriage bolt?
I'd go with a forced fit as copper is a soft metal. May have to file the shoulders down a bit if they're taller than the thickness of the pot.
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Old 09-01-2016, 04:58 PM   #30
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I am currently using the old copper Revereware pots and pans. There was some adjustment before I figured out where they could be safely kept and a couple of them fell on the floor before I had that figured out. Now because of that, or because of age, the brass handle of the 2 qt pot has fallen off.

I can't tell if the handle was riveted on or not. Although it looks to have been welded, I can see what looks like 3 screws in both the handle and the pan (there are no rivets in the inside of the pot itself - the entire inside is smooth all the way around).

My question is, is it worth it to try to reweld the handle back on and if it is, does anyone know where I would go to have this done? And any guess at what it might cost?




Your pot is Revere Signature ware. The handles were not riveted, but rather installed with a heat curing adhesive. I've heard of a couple of handles coming loose. To replace you have 2 options. A retinner such as Rocky Mountain Retinning can rivet the handle for you. The other option is to use one of the heat resistant glues now available. I bought a tube for a few bucks ago at an auto parts store. I am impressed with the holding quality.

A realistic price for that pot on EBay is $25 - $30 without the lid. Quite a few are available in unused condition as they were often used as decoration in coppertone kitchens. Either way the repair/replacement should be in this price range.

They're actually pretty good cookware. More copper clad stainless steel than true copper cookware.
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