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Old 04-01-2008, 05:01 PM   #11
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The first picture is of a lyon pan. Flat bottom and straight slanted sides.


The second picture is a frying pan. Flat bottom and curved slanted sides.


The third picture is a saute pan. Flat bottom and straignt right angle sides.
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Old 04-01-2008, 06:23 PM   #12
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terms differ from country to country. The Lyon pan is sometimes called a French pan, and if you go to parts Europe our fry pan here in the US is a saute pan and our saute pan is their fry pan.

What makes it desirable: 1) thick metal able to take and transmit heat, lots of it. 2) not expensive compared to stainless steel or other metals 3) darkens with age and use, easy to clean with hot water and a brush. 4) stove to oven no problem any temp you like.

drawbacks 1) moderately heavy 2) gets real HOT 3) can get rusty if not kept seasoned

The Lyon handle is slightly V shaped so the palm closes around it and the thumb sits in the top "indent". Pot holder or side towel required or you'll burn your hand.

THe differences between pans is subtle to see but great in actual use.
are you sauteing mushrooms? you want the sloping sides so you can toss/shake the food in the pan / are you pan frying chicken, you want the high straight sides to hold the oil and minimize splatters / are you searing meat before tossing it in the oven, then the Lyon or French pan is ideal beacuse of its metal and shape.

Could you have just one pan and do all these things? sure, most home cooks do. but you waont get "restaurant results"
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Old 04-01-2008, 06:40 PM   #13
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Fisher's Mom:

This is the description you alluded to: "The traditional black steel Lyon shaped frying pan creates a generous food to heat ratio which allows for setting, scrambling and searing. The angled sides keep in steam and discourage dry frying. The flat, iron handle is solidly affixed"

That's all bilge as far as I'm concerned. I could say the same thing about a horse's a.. shaped frying pan.
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Old 04-01-2008, 06:54 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mignon View Post
Fisher's Mom:

This is the description you alluded to: "The traditional black steel Lyon shaped frying pan creates a generous food to heat ratio which allows for setting, scrambling and searing. The angled sides keep in steam and discourage dry frying. The flat, iron handle is solidly affixed"

That's all bilge as far as I'm concerned. I could say the same thing about a horse's a.. shaped frying pan.

mignon:

I'm not sure why you are getting angry at the people here who are trying to help you.

If none of the explanations and photos to date answer your questions, I'm not sure how we can help you any further.
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Old 04-01-2008, 07:10 PM   #15
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mignon, of course it is advertising twaddle, but how else to describe a round metal disk of 3mm thickness that has been "punched " into shape by an industrial metal mold press. frankly we could all be cooking on hot rocks over open fires, but that is not as easy or controllable or sanitary etc.

Cookware began in ancient times and basic shapes evolved for basic techniques of roasting stewing/braising, frying /sauteing, boiling/poaching etc

What to look for is quality and thickness of metal, type of metal for the job or style of cooking, handle shape and comfort, weight, cost, type of range/cooker. Copper is great for heat control but not if you have an induction range as it is not magnetic.

So the carbon steel Lyon pan is great for many things requiring heat or fats/oils. But it is a fry/saute pan.
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Old 04-02-2008, 12:47 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
The first picture is of a lyon pan. Flat bottom and straight slanted sides.

The second picture is a frying pan. Flat bottom and curved slanted sides.

The third picture is a saute pan. Flat bottom and straignt right angle sides.
Odd. I've always called pan #2 a skillet and just refer to all pans designed for frying (deep frying generally excluded) "frying pans."

...And that's how dialectal disparities will destroy us all.
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Old 04-02-2008, 12:54 AM   #17
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Odd. I've always called pan #2 a skillet and just refer to all pans designed for frying (deep frying generally excluded) "frying pans."

...And that's how dialectal disparities will destroy us all.
I've had the same problem. It wasn't until I found DC that I learned the difference between a saute pan and a fry pan. I just called em all fry pans.
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Old 04-03-2008, 02:30 PM   #18
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Would you believe it, even the "Cookware Manufacturer's Association" is stumped by the "Lyon shaped frying pan." I have yet to receive a response from them regarding this ubiquitously advertised product. Indeed, vendors selling "lyon shaped frying pans" have failed to respond to inquiries with any illuminating information, so far.

I may just seek psychological counseling, forget all this stuff, and opt to buy a couscoussier instead.
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Old 04-03-2008, 04:21 PM   #19
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I believe I have seen the "lyon" pan as posted above generally referred to as a "Chef's" pan?
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Old 04-03-2008, 04:58 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mignon View Post
Would you believe it, even the "Cookware Manufacturer's Association" is stumped by the "Lyon shaped frying pan." I have yet to receive a response from them regarding this ubiquitously advertised product. Indeed, vendors selling "lyon shaped frying pans" have failed to respond to inquiries with any illuminating information, so far.

I may just seek psychological counseling, forget all this stuff, and opt to buy a couscoussier instead.

I need your help to understand what kind of description/explanation/definition you are seeking beyond what has already been offered.

Could you explain, please?
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