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Old 02-09-2011, 09:22 PM   #11
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I have had a wooden counter top for over 20 years. To keep it pretty, I occasionally rub mineral oil on it. It's never gone rancid. I know the kind of oil one uses is important. When I got the counter top, I was told to use mineral oil. Glad it worked for me. I had no idea what to use.

You have been using the right oil for the job. Mineral oil will not go rancid like vegetable oils will.
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Old 02-09-2011, 09:25 PM   #12
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Bamboo is actually a grass, not wood. They look great, but are not very good for your knives. As Andy mentioned, the resin that is used makes them much too hard. I had a small one that I used for a while, but my knives were dulling very quickly on it. They also do not have the same feel as wood. They have a more slippery feel. I love how mine looks, but it is now just for decoration.
I use mine for a serving platter, like for a cheese course.
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Old 02-09-2011, 09:26 PM   #13
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Great idea Jenny.
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Old 02-09-2011, 09:26 PM   #14
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You have been using the right oil for the job. Mineral oil will not go rancid like vegetable oils will.
It won't go rancid but it is a laxative, so you need to wipe thoroughly. So to speak ..........
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Old 02-09-2011, 09:41 PM   #15
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You have been using the right oil for the job. Mineral oil will not go rancid like vegetable oils will.
Thanks for that info everyone!!

LOL @ Jennyema!!
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Old 02-09-2011, 09:53 PM   #16
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It won't go rancid but it is a laxative...
Exactly. So don't spend a lot of money buying expensive cutting board oils. Go to the local drug store and pick up a bottle of mineral oil in the laxatives section. Much cheaper.
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Old 02-09-2011, 11:03 PM   #17
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Exactly. So don't spend a lot of money buying expensive cutting board oils. Go to the local drug store and pick up a bottle of mineral oil in the laxatives section. Much cheaper.
Andy

Aren't most of those "cutting board oils" just repackaged mineral oil with a 1000% markup?
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Old 02-09-2011, 11:09 PM   #18
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Andy

Aren't most of those "cutting board oils" just repackaged mineral oil with a 1000% markup?

That's right, Jen. It's amazing to see the high prices they charge for the same mineral oil you can have for a buck or so @ CVS.
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Old 02-10-2011, 12:00 AM   #19
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I got my bottle of oil for super cheap at the hardware store.

Anyway..on subject, I had a bamboo board for a while, I never noticed any amount of knife damage on my edge but I did feel the surface was rather slow and they are heavy but I leave my main board in one spot that I like to work at.
However, due to the weight,fear of lack of space when moving into new kitchens, and the fact that it felt really slow I switched to a butcher block (so damn heavy) and a large hardwood board and am much happier.
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Old 02-10-2011, 01:43 AM   #20
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As to your first question, bamboo boards were originally touted based on their style and appearance and that they were a soft surface for knives. However, they are made using a very hard epoxy that holds the board together and that hardness is not good for knife edges.

As to washing it, getting all the soap off would be key. some just wipe their boards clean with vinegar so bacteria growth is not an issue.
I read that the same process is used to fuse together maple cutting boards, as well, though.

But either way, I think it just comes down to what you wanna do first - sharpen your knifes or get a new cutting board. Common sense dictates that the less marks there are on your cutting board, the harder and worse it is on your knives. The more marks, the softer and better for your knife, but bad for the durability and porous aspect of the cutting board.

At the end of the day, it's really just a matter of preference.

I also find it ironic that you need diamonds to sharpen steel, but a carrot can do your knife in. At some point, you just have to let loose a bit and not let every little dos-and-don'ts ruin your sanity.
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