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Old 02-10-2011, 02:07 AM   #21
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Thanks guys for all your helpful input!
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Old 02-10-2011, 08:50 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by rush View Post
I read that the same process is used to fuse together maple cutting boards, as well, though.

But either way, I think it just comes down to what you wanna do first - sharpen your knifes or get a new cutting board. Common sense dictates that the less marks there are on your cutting board, the harder and worse it is on your knives. The more marks, the softer and better for your knife, but bad for the durability and porous aspect of the cutting board.

At the end of the day, it's really just a matter of preference.

I also find it ironic that you need diamonds to sharpen steel, but a carrot can do your knife in. At some point, you just have to let loose a bit and not let every little dos-and-don'ts ruin your sanity.

I made a decision some time ago that, for me, a cutting board is a necessary tool and that appearance was not important. As a result, I have a number of plastic cutting boards in different colors and sizes. They are lightweight, kind to knife edges, dishwasher safe and can be sanitized/de-stained with a simple bleach solution.

Given the relative effort to sharpen a knife as opposed to washing/replacing a cutting board, I chose to preserve my knives and keep it simple with my boards.
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Old 02-10-2011, 09:11 AM   #23
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I love my plastic boards for just the reasons you stated. Especially the DW safe aspect.
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Old 02-10-2011, 02:42 PM   #24
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Here's a picture of my bamboo cutting board. I love it and have had it for about three years with little to no signs of wear. It stays right where it is for a counter saver/dish drainer/cutting board. I clean it under the faucet with vinegar, and oil it occasionally. I havn't noticed any undue dulling of my knives. I didn't want a huge thick board because of the weight for cleaning. I keep a folded tea towel under it to keep the board in place. The best part is, I paid around $20 for it at Target, 3 years ago.
I have the exact same cutting board love it.

Josie
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Old 02-10-2011, 04:50 PM   #25
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I use heavy-duty white plastic commercial-grade cutting boards for most purposes, which I purchase from a local restaurant supply house. They're inexpensive, non-skid and easy to clean (dishwasher safe). I have several wood and bamboo boards but they get infrequent use. However, cleaning wood boards isn't much of an issue. I usually just wipe them with a damp cloth and don't use them for raw meats or poultry. I use mineral oil on my butcher block but not my wood cutting boards.
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Old 02-10-2011, 05:54 PM   #26
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My first bamboo block was a small one, just to test it out. It's mostly decorative now, though it does comes into play when an extra board is needed. I still cringe for my knives when I hear them slam through a carrot onto the board.

I'm also cringing a bit at the thought that maybe some of my dinner hosts have multi-purpose mineral oil for their cutting blocks...
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Old 02-10-2011, 06:43 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I made a decision some time ago that, for me, a cutting board is a necessary tool and that appearance was not important. As a result, I have a number of plastic cutting boards in different colors and sizes. They are lightweight, kind to knife edges, dishwasher safe and can be sanitized/de-stained with a simple bleach solution.

Given the relative effort to sharpen a knife as opposed to washing/replacing a cutting board, I chose to preserve my knives and keep it simple with my boards.

Me too!

Life is too short to maintain cutting boards. Drink more wine instead!
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Old 02-10-2011, 06:47 PM   #28
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Funny you should mention bamboo cutting boards as I just bought one on sale at Macy's this weekend. It is a Martha Stewart, large in size and only cost me $13 but was originally priced at around $90. For that price I will take it.
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Old 02-10-2011, 10:01 PM   #29
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The Martha Stewart board I bought says on it that it "Won't Dull Blades." It says eco=friendly also. It is 14"x20".

The care instructions are as follows: "Wash in mild soapy water. Do not soak. Do not place on wet countertop. To prevent drying of wood, apply mineral oil once a month and as needed. Always was board after preparing the meats to avoid food contamination."
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Old 02-10-2011, 10:30 PM   #30
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I see two things wrong with what that Martha Stewart board info says mkaylady. All boards dull blades. The only question is to what degree. The other thing is that bamboo is not wood.
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