"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-09-2011, 05:58 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 125
Are bamboo cutting boards worth it?

I decided to purchase the "Little Kahuna" bamboo cutting board from Amazon. It costed $90. I considered the "Big Kahuna," but I know for a fact I don't have space for it.

Anyway, I liked this particular model, because it was around 3" in thickness. Thick cutting boards really give you that gourmet/luxurious feel, so that's why I decided to invest in it.

That said, I'm starting to wonder if I bit off more than I can chew. First off, the thing weighs a ton. I'm not exactly sure how I'm supposed to maneuver this thing around a home kitchen sink...

Second, maintenance. This is like the cast iron skillet of cutting boards. It requires constant seasoning, to prevent cracking and warping.

Do the benefits outweigh the cost and maintenance? What do you guys think?

So far, to my understanding, the benefits of wooden cutting boards over plastic, is that you get better knife control and it's pretty to look at.

The knock on these thick wooden cutting boards on the other hand, is the cost, the heavy weight, the cost and time factored into general maintenance.

What do you guys think?

__________________

__________________
rush is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2011, 06:04 PM   #2
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 125
Also, how do people clean really large cutting boards?

For example, the walnut cutting boards often featured on Food Network. They look like they're around 20x20. I think they cost around $200-$300. They're sold at Walnut Cutting Boards, Cherry Cutting Board, Wood Conditioner

According to care instructions, it says to never submerge it in water, and for cleaning, just get a soapy rag and towel dry.

So my question is, do you think a soapy rag and a dry towel are enough to do the trick on a well-seasoned wooden board? Or is it a health risk, but a necessary one in exchange for aesthetic appeal?

Lastly, should I just take the soapy rag/dry towel approach, as well?
__________________

__________________
rush is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2011, 06:15 PM   #3
Traveling Welcome Wagon
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Somewhere, US
Posts: 15,919
Do a forum search and you should be able to find the information you want. I know there is at least one thread that mentions them. If I remember correctly, many didn't like them because they were hard on knives? I'm not sure, but go ahead and try the search.
__________________
Barbara L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2011, 06:15 PM   #4
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,386
As to your first question, bamboo boards were originally touted based on their style and appearance and that they were a soft surface for knives. However, they are made using a very hard epoxy that holds the board together and that hardness is not good for knife edges.

As to washing it, getting all the soap off would be key. some just wipe their boards clean with vinegar so bacteria growth is not an issue.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2011, 06:20 PM   #5
Traveling Welcome Wagon
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Somewhere, US
Posts: 15,919
What Andy said is what I also found here: What type of cutting board?
__________________
Barbara L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2011, 06:32 PM   #6
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,887
Here's a picture of my bamboo cutting board. I love it and have had it for about three years with little to no signs of wear. It stays right where it is for a counter saver/dish drainer/cutting board. I clean it under the faucet with vinegar, and oil it occasionally. I havn't noticed any undue dulling of my knives. I didn't want a huge thick board because of the weight for cleaning. I keep a folded tea towel under it to keep the board in place. The best part is, I paid around $20 for it at Target, 3 years ago.
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2011, 06:51 PM   #7
Senior Cook
 
AnnieDrews's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 409
I bought a cheepie (read: No big loss if it doesn't last.) at TJ Maxx a while back. At first, it looked like it might splinter and dry out. I avoid putting it in the dishwasher (but I have a few times) and don't use for meats so bacteria doesn't get imbedded in it. I posted a question about it on another forum I belong to (healthy eating, exercise, etc.) and some other members suggested sanding it every now and again with a fine sandpaper and oiling it. I haven't done either....with use and washing it has seemed to smooth out. I don't want to put oil on it as I'm afraid it might go rancid.
__________________
AnnieDrews is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2011, 08:54 PM   #8
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Bamboo is actually a grass, not wood. They look great, but are not very good for your knives. As Andy mentioned, the resin that is used makes them much too hard. I had a small one that I used for a while, but my knives were dulling very quickly on it. They also do not have the same feel as wood. They have a more slippery feel. I love how mine looks, but it is now just for decoration.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2011, 09:03 PM   #9
Cupcake
 
Kathleen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Mid-Atlantic, USA
Posts: 2,315
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieDrews View Post
I bought a cheepie (read: No big loss if it doesn't last.) at TJ Maxx a while back. At first, it looked like it might splinter and dry out. I avoid putting it in the dishwasher (but I have a few times) and don't use for meats so bacteria doesn't get imbedded in it. I posted a question about it on another forum I belong to (healthy eating, exercise, etc.) and some other members suggested sanding it every now and again with a fine sandpaper and oiling it. I haven't done either....with use and washing it has seemed to smooth out. I don't want to put oil on it as I'm afraid it might go rancid.
I have had a wooden counter top for over 20 years. To keep it pretty, I occasionally rub mineral oil on it. It's never gone rancid. I know the kind of oil one uses is important. When I got the counter top, I was told to use mineral oil. Glad it worked for me. I had no idea what to use.
__________________
A little bit Ginger. A little bit Mary Ann.
Kathleen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2011, 09:04 PM   #10
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
Bamboo is actually a grass, not wood. They look great, but are not very good for your knives. As Andy mentioned, the resin that is used makes them much too hard. I had a small one that I used for a while, but my knives were dulling very quickly on it. They also do not have the same feel as wood. They have a more slippery feel. I love how mine looks, but it is now just for decoration.

I have a decorative bamboo cutting board, too! At least I got it cheap.
__________________

__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:27 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.