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Old 07-21-2010, 01:02 PM   #11
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Ok Andy M , i change my reply,,get some cheap,thin crappy cookware bsc1975.
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Old 07-21-2010, 01:34 PM   #12
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Ok Andy M , i change my reply,,get some cheap,thin crappy cookware bsc1975.
no, no...don;t change. I was using this thread as an excuse to go shopping!

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Old 07-21-2010, 02:23 PM   #13
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no, no...don;t change. I was using this thread as an excuse to go shopping!

Ok i change my reply Janet H...They also make the best deeeeep fryers for indian cookery n french fries...samosa anyone?I may just go shopping myself.
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Old 07-21-2010, 03:22 PM   #14
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Just as a bit of background and something I wasn't aware of until this past week, but curry isn't Indian. It's a mixture of spices that the British concocted in England to remind them of the flavors of India after they gave it up to independence. It's kind of like the American invention of Chop Suey. It's said that if you ask an Indian cook about their curry dishes, they'll simply stare at you strangely. Indians cook masala.
Not true at all Selkie. Curry is DEFINITELY Indian - not British. Completely. The original British-concocted mixture of spices is simply the common "yellow curry powder". Nothing more; nothing less.

Indian curry spice mixtures run into thousands & thousands of different mixtures, since every individual area & even every individual Indian family has their own specific curry mixes. This is why asking an Indian for "curry" might meet with a stare - it means different things to different areas of India, as well as individual families. There's no such thing as just "curry" in India. Even the very common "Garam Masala" spice mix used in many curries varies tremendously in its ingredients.

Pick up a good authentic Indian cookbook with some culture included - it'll verify what I've posted.
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Old 08-13-2010, 06:31 PM   #15
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My love of Indian food has inspired me to learn how to cook curries.

I'm a novice, but with a handful of dishes behind me I'm ready to purchase new cookware for my hobby.

I'm looking for a pan that heats evenly, cooks well, doesn't taint the flavor or color of my food; a piece of cookware that will last a very long time.

I usually only make enough food for 2-4 people.

I'm willing to spend the money for something that suits my needs.
For 2 to 4 people, you'll need a pan large enough to provide second helpings, as you probably know just how wonderful Indian food tastes. Buy a pan made from stainless steel, because aluminium will react with curry spices.

There is no need to spend a lot. I suggest you buy a wok. Carbon steel is best for evenly distributing heat, but you must season it before use. as for pans, check out Amazon.com as they have excellent cut prices on Calphalon, Cuisinart etc.

SWIFT are excellent value for money. They mostly make stockpots, actually very good for Indian food.
Swift Supreme sg Deep Stockpot and Lid, 20cm, 5.5 Litres: Amazon.co.uk: Kitchen & Home

Incidentally, Wikipedia has a very good section on the origins of Curry. Curry did not originate from England as some believe.

Curry - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Good luck. :)
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Old 03-20-2011, 05:10 PM   #16
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curry pan

hello

i started of with indian cooking and still used a lot of sauce-style dishes with indian spices. i found that any saute pan with at least 3" height works well. in my experience sloping sides seemed more comfortabkle for cooking than flat sides.
i like my 4.5qt bourgeat evasee for its shape and size which is just right for all semi-wet "curries". quality of SS is great so cleanup is always easy. i have also used 10-11" pans with flat sides successfully. i would not use indian pots because maintenance is high (cleanup etc) and their handles are not often convenient. also, a wider dutch oven(5-6qt) is ok too but they are more suitable for liquidy-curries. indian wet-ish curries stay for quite a while so better to cook in quantity ..so size of 4-6 qt works better 2-3 qt .

note. inidians also make dry dishes..for that, a wide pan (14") works well

rgds
mn
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Old 03-21-2011, 02:50 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
Not true at all Selkie. Curry is DEFINITELY Indian - not British. Completely. The original British-concocted mixture of spices is simply the common "yellow curry powder". Nothing more; nothing less.

Indian curry spice mixtures run into thousands & thousands of different mixtures, since every individual area & even every individual Indian family has their own specific curry mixes. This is why asking an Indian for "curry" might meet with a stare - it means different things to different areas of India, as well as individual families. There's no such thing as just "curry" in India. Even the very common "Garam Masala" spice mix used in many curries varies tremendously in its ingredients.

Pick up a good authentic Indian cookbook with some culture included - it'll verify what I've posted.
From my understanding, the British contribution to curries was writing down the recipes.
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Old 03-21-2011, 04:03 AM   #18
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I'm a brit in Hindi there is no word "curry" Selkie is nearly right when the British Raj was removed from India they returned with various masala spice powders, they are called Curry powder in English. A style of cooking "curries" has developed over here its called batch cooking restaurant style, the product is nothing like the Indian home version, it was developed so a spiced braise of Lamb, Beef or Pork( pork vindaloo is a portuguese christian dish) can be produced in 10 mins. I will explain how it is done if you want.
This is a good web site it has recipes and advicehttp://www.mamtaskitchen.com my older brother bought the Curry Club where Pat Chappman is the English master unfortunately his company sold it about 20 yrs agoHome - Pat Chapman's Curry Club I was taught by the chefs at VEERASWAMY - home 35 yrs ago when my family firm supplied them, I used to visit them once a week to take their rice and spice orders and eat lunch with the chefs they started my love of Indian food.
Ps on V website and its sister restaurant you will not see the word curry to them it like calling a Macdonalds a beefburger
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Old 03-21-2011, 09:49 PM   #19
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This is a good web site it has recipes and adviceMamta's Kitchen my older brother bought the Curry Club where Pat Chappman is the English master unfortunately his company sold it about 20 yrs agoHome - Pat Chapman's Curry Club I was taught by the chefs at VEERASWAMY - home 35 yrs ago when my family firm supplied them, I used to visit them once a week to take their rice and spice orders and eat lunch with the chefs they started my love of Indian food.
Great links! I bookmarked http://www.mamtaskitchen.comand FB friended
Home - Pat Chapman's Curry Club.
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Old 03-21-2011, 09:53 PM   #20
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and will continue now, since I could not get the HTML controls to behave ... I have never attempted Indian Breads, because the recipes seem to require either a tandoori or a gas range, neither of which I have. What can I do to make naan, if I have and electric range in the US?
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