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Old 09-03-2012, 09:53 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8

Do you dilute it with water?
No. Straight vinegar, if it's really wretched, some baking soda. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, then simmer till the stains are gone.
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Old 09-03-2012, 09:58 PM   #22
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kitchengoddess, are you able to use your broiler function in your oven? I know it's kind of a pain for one small steak, but maybe you could double it and use the extra steak for a stir fry, or another dish. Just suggesting an option...
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Old 09-03-2012, 10:14 PM   #23
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Just deglaze the pan, that's all you need to do. That's the first step toward a great sauce anyway. All that leftover stuff in the pan is gold, don't waste it!! Even if you just deglaze with a little water, reduce it to a syrupy consistency, and put a light glaze of the steak on the plate, it'll bring lots of flavor to the party.
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Old 09-03-2012, 10:17 PM   #24
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If you are just cooking for one person you may do well with a small cast iron pan. I have a 5" skillet that is great for cooking 2 or 3 eggs and would do well with a single steak. It's not very heavy. You might consider it.
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Old 09-03-2012, 11:12 PM   #25
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10" heavy carbon steel pan, French style. Sears steaks, goes under the broiler, indestructible. Cleans up like a lady for omelets. World Cuisine, inexpensive.
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Old 09-04-2012, 08:05 AM   #26
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I ought not to post when overly tired. I suspect neither my reading nor writing comprehension was up to par. The OP asked about other pans...That is the root of the reference to the Chief's post. I apologize for being so cryptic.
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Old 09-04-2012, 09:09 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8 View Post
I used to have a cast iron pan but it was hard to use because of my arthritis, very painful to lift and move around. I ended up giving it away.
Cast iron pans normally have shorter handles than Matfer or De Buyer carbon steel pans. Although lighter than cast iron, a quality carbon steel pan can still be fairly heavy but the longer handle helps make the weight more manageable.
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Old 09-04-2012, 09:23 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Cast iron pans normally have shorter handles than Matfer or De Buyer carbon steel pans. Although lighter than cast iron, a quality carbon steel pan can still be fairly heavy but the longer handle helps make the weight more manageable.
Longer handles are actually harder to manage if you have wrist problems.

The problem is, the lighter the pan the more likely you are to burn the oil or food.

I would suggest a smaller cast iron skillet or a cast iron griddle with short handles that you can pick up with both hands.

Cast iron is the very best for steak. I would not recommend nonstick.
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Old 09-04-2012, 10:03 AM   #29
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Longer handles are actually harder to manage if you have wrist problems.

The problem is, the lighter the pan the more likely you are to burn the oil or food.

I would suggest a smaller cast iron skillet or a cast iron griddle with short handles that you can pick up with both hands.

Cast iron is the very best for steak. I would not recommend nonstick.
Depends on where you grab the handles and whether or not you use both hands.
If you choke up on the handle (using a mitten) you can rest rear of the handle on your forearm.
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Old 09-04-2012, 11:00 AM   #30
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I use my square cast iron stove top grill pan (and a press sometimes).

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