"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-05-2016, 02:08 PM   #21
Master Chef
 
msmofet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 8,983
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
After the oven cycle, leave the pan in the oven to cool. It will be dusty with ash from the burned off coating. Just wipe it off with a dry cloth.

Pre-heat your oven to 350ºF. Coat the pan with the thinnest possible coating of fat. If you're going to use Crisco, you may be better off melting it first so you can spread it sparingly and wipe off the excess. Too much fat will pool and give you sticky spots. I usually use peanut oil. Corn oil is also an option.

Place the pan upside down on a shelf with a sheet of foil on a shelf under the pan to catch drips. Bake the pan for an hour and turn off the oven. Leave the pan in the oven to cool completely. You should have a nice black coating for polymerized fat on the pan. It should not be sticky.

When I do this, I do three coats before cooking with the pan.
Is there a waiting time between coats? I have flaxseed oil, grape seed oil, canola oil and coconut oil would one of those be better to season with?
__________________

__________________
There is freedom within, there is freedom without
Try to catch the deluge in a paper cup
There's a battle ahead, many battles are lost
msmofet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2016, 02:09 PM   #22
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,300
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stock Pot View Post
I know ammonia takes off burned, caked on on grease in an oven. Might work on cast iron. But WalMart sells Lodge pans pretty cheap, if you have one near you.
Place the pan into a large garbage bag alongside a bowl of ammonia. Let sit overnight. In the morning, the burnt residue will come right off. This also works for crusty gas stove grates, and oven grates. It also works with grill and barbecue greats.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2016, 02:11 PM   #23
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 42,034
Quote:
Originally Posted by msmofet View Post
Is there a waiting time between coats? I have flaxseed oil, grape seed oil, canola oil and coconut oil would one of those be better to season with?
No waiting time other than allowing the pan to cool in the oven before taking it out. You can then reheat the oven and go again.

Just about any fat will do the trick. Don't worry too much about it.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2016, 02:49 PM   #24
Master Chef
 
msmofet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 8,983
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
No waiting time other than allowing the pan to cool in the oven before taking it out. You can then reheat the oven and go again.

Just about any fat will do the trick. Don't worry too much about it.
Thanks Andy
__________________
There is freedom within, there is freedom without
Try to catch the deluge in a paper cup
There's a battle ahead, many battles are lost
msmofet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2016, 04:56 AM   #25
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Calosso, Piemonte
Posts: 384
I always thought cast iron was porous. That's why, I've need told, it's difficult to get right if it burns again. It has happened to me on one or two occasions, and I burned off the scorched bits, cleaned the pan with a pan scourer, rinsed it without any detergent at all, dried it slowly on the hob, and then started seasoning it again as soon as it was hot and dry, using olive oil at a medium heat, then leaving it to cool, wiping it clean, and it was ok after that. Now I usually wipe my cast iron pans with an oiled cloth, when they are clean, I put another drizzle of oil, and then store ready for the next use. It works fine for me!

di reston


Enough is never as good as a feast Oscar Wilde
__________________
di reston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2016, 07:19 AM   #26
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 18,351
Quote:
Originally Posted by di reston View Post
I always thought cast iron was porous. That's why, I've need told, it's difficult to get right if it burns again.
Cast iron is not porous. If it was, it wouldn't be as durable.

From http://www.castironcollector.com/myths.php

Quote:
That cast iron is porous.
False. Many have been led to believe that not only is cast iron porous, but that those pores expand and contract with changes in temperature, allowing oil or other foreign substances to not only adhere but to be "absorbed" or "sealed" into the iron. While even polished iron is not completely flat, any voids are simply microscopic irregularities resulting from the removal of crystalline graphite, a carbon component of the cast iron, at the surface.
That site also says that subjecting a cast iron pan to high heat can damage it.

Quote:
Belief #2: The best, easiest way to clean build up from a cast iron pan is to burn it off in a fire.*
True or False?: False. While fire will indeed typically completely remove build up, intense heat will often damage the pan, either by warping or cracking it, or by potentially altering the molecular structure of the iron, making it irreversibly scaly.*
Origins: Most likely from frontier era camp cooks who would have had no other way to refurbish heavily encrusted pans.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2016, 08:43 AM   #27
Sous Chef
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 517
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Place the pan into a large garbage bag alongside a bowl of ammonia. Let sit overnight. In the morning, the burnt residue will come right off. This also works for crusty gas stove grates, and oven grates. It also works with grill and barbecue greats.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

First off I must say, don't worry about it at all. My lodge skillet and my cast iron dutch oven have some burn scars on them, it just adds to the seasoning. I wipe them out with a paper towel and crisco after they cool off and leave them alone. Works out fine. Generally if something burns and leaves a residue, it comes off natural like after a number of uses.

I do have to say though that Chief's ammonia thing here is ingenious. I adore hacks like that. Chief, you have some wisdom, continue to impress me. Never would have occurred to me to use ammonia vapor such way, but makes complete sense.

TBS
__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2016, 08:50 AM   #28
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Richmond, Va
Posts: 1,245
Quote:
Originally Posted by msmofet View Post
Is there a waiting time between coats? I have flaxseed oil, grape seed oil, canola oil and coconut oil would one of those be better to season with?
If you ask 5 CI aficionados which oil is best, you'll get 6 different answers. Myself I use flaxseed. Applied in the thinnest coat possible. I put mine in a cold oven, heat to 400 or more for an hour or so and let the oven cool before opening. No waiting time necessary. Do this 5 or 6 times. It's a long process, but not time consuming. You can do several at a time.

The upside to flaxseed is it creates the hardest surface. The downside is it's the most expensive.
__________________
Bigjim68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2016, 09:18 AM   #29
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,692
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
If you ask 5 CI aficionados which oil is best, you'll get 6 different answers. Myself I use flaxseed. Applied in the thinnest coat possible. I put mine in a cold oven, heat to 400 or more for an hour or so and let the oven cool before opening. No waiting time necessary. Do this 5 or 6 times. It's a long process, but not time consuming. You can do several at a time.

The upside to flaxseed is it creates the hardest surface. The downside is it's the most expensive.
I agree completely about flaxseed oil. It's what I use for both cast iron and carbon steel pans. You're right that it's expensive but a small bottle lasts a long time.

I used to season my pans in the oven, but do it on the stove top anymore. It seems to work just as well, if not better, for me. Yes, I know the oven provides for more even distribution of heat, but the stove top gets the job done quicker and I've had less problem with uneven (read "sticky") buildup than when I've done it in the oven. If the oil starts to pool anywhere, you can see it right away and deal with it on the spot.

For what it's worth, if I were to buy a new pan or strip down and re-season an older one, I would probably experiment with applying a couple of thin coats of oil to the outside only, and doing that in the oven (the oven really works well for this part of it), and then switch to the stove for applying the internal seasoning.

I also agree with not using extremely high heat. I remember about 30 years ago my dad stripped down one of his old CI pans by putting it the oven on the cleaning cycle. Well, the pan came out clean of debris alright, but the high also ended up creating a noticeable bulge in the bottom of the pan. He ended up throwing it out because it wobbled so bad on the stove after that.

Like you say, everyone has their own preferred method of doing it, though. And of course everyone will say their method works the best.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2016, 09:20 AM   #30
Sous Chef
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 517
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
If you ask 5 CI aficionados which oil is best, you'll get 6 different answers. Myself I use flaxseed.
Cripes, I just use Crisco on my Cast Iron, sometimes corn oil, if I'm out of crisco. Do you think you get a better result from fancy oil? I have good olive oil (I do seek out the real stuff), sesame oil I use for Asian based dishes, and sunflower oil which is good for Mediterranean or Persian dishes.

Most of my cast iron cookery skills are pretty practical Boy Scout, Appalachian mountians stuff. Am I missing out on something?

TBS
__________________

__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cast iron

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.